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2010 FIFA World Cup Qualifying Second Round

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Fans Flock to Lincoln Park to Watch World Cup Final

More than 7,000 of the #BestFansInTheWorld gathered in Chicago's Lincoln Park on Sunday to watch the USA take on Japan in the Final of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.  The free and open to the public event was organized by U.S. Soccer with support from the Chicago Park District and featured a 19-by-33 foot, high definition screen.  Fans were able to purchase merchandise and food and beverages, and there was also a variety of free activities for fans to enjoy while cheering for the USA. 

It's a Party in the USA!

As the final whistle blew at BC Place in Vancouver and the U.S. WNT became World Champions, there was a lot to celebrate. It began on the field, where players saluted fans, friends, and family.  Medals were given and the trophy was hoisted, but that was just the beginning.  The team then participated in a photo shoot with the World Cup trophy, creating memories to last a lifetime before they headed to Fan HQ to continue the celebration. 

The USA is now the only country to win three Women's World Cups and is the country to score the most goals (five) in a WWC final -- no other team has scored more than two.  The WNT will return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Chattanooga, Tennessee, respectively, before embarking on their nationwide celebration tour (details to be announced). 

World Cup Champs! USA Earns Third Star

Building off a quick start and a first half hat trick from midfielder Carli Lloyd, the WNT beat Japan last night at BC Place in Vancouver, winning the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and earning the title of World Champions.  The USA is now the only country to win three Women's World Cups and is the country to score the most goals (five) in a WWC final -- no other team has scored more than two.  The WNT will return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Chattanooga, Tennessee, respectively, before embarking on their nationwide celebration tour (details to be announced). 

Timmy Chandler Talks First International Goal

With the entire U.S. MNT Gold Cup roster gathered in Nashville on Thursday, U.S. Soccer ran players through a photo and video shoot ahead of this month’s regional championship. About halfway through the shoot the day before the game against Guatemala, defender Timmy Chandler arrived at the photo station and was told to replicate a regular goal celebration for the cameras.

“I don’t have one. I never score,” said the veteran right back who has just five goals in over 100 Bundesliga appearances.

“If I ever score --,” he tried to explain, before being cut off by team photographer John Dorton.

“It’s not a matter of if you ever score, it’s when you score,” he said.

Chandler would have done well to take that wisdom to heart going into Friday’s friendly. With the U.S. already leading 2-0 in the 58th minute, the 25-year-old received a pass from DeAndre Yedlin on the right and took the space in front of him to unleash a lethal, left-footed strike inside the far left post.

In the immediate moments following the goal, Chandler showed he hadn’t thought much about that celebration still. Instead of pumping his first or jumping in the air, Chandler got mobbed by his teammates about 25 yards from goal.

It was the celebration he preferred anyway.

“I didn’t have time to think,” he said Saturday morning. “I was very shocked -- it was a very nice goal. I was just happy to see all the guys come to me, congratulate me and laugh. The day before they asked me to do a celebration and I told them I didn’t have one because I never score. The next day I score. It’s a funny story, but I’m just happy to score my first goal for the National Team – it meant a lot for me.”

Following the match, the right-footed Chandler told reporters that four of his five professional goals had come with his left foot. Aside from the obvious reason of a right back cutting inside to shoot, Chandler told ussoccer.com Saturday his left peg just feels stronger to take shots with.

I feel confident in my left. I’m better crossing inside with my right, but I think I have a better, harder strike with my left. It has happened a few times in the Bundesliga. I’ve tried it a few times, but not every time as good as yesterday. The goal gave me some confidence, for sure.”

Chandler’s goal helped put the game out of reach for Guatemala before Chris Wondolowski added a fourth late in the match. While he earned praise from Jurgen Klinsmann post-game, Chandler agreed with the U.S. manager’s assessment that the team needed to improve upon its performance ahead of Tuesday’s Gold Cup opener against Honduras in Frisco, Texas.

“The first 10-20 minutes we didn’t play a very good game. We let the ball go a little bit. It’s not the best we’ve played in the last few months. After the second goal we did well, but we take Jurgen’s comments to heart. We know we need to do more to win against Honduras.”  

Selección Femenina de Estados Unidos es Campeón Mundial de FIFA 2015 con Victoria contra Japón

VANCOUVER, Canadá (5 de julio, 2015) – La Selección Femenina de Estados Unidos consiguió su tercer título mundial al vencer 5-2 a Japón en la Copa Mundial de la FIFA 2015.

Estados Unidos salió a toda velocidad, anotando dos goles en los primeros cinco minutos. Los goles de Carli Lloyd cayeron en los minutos tres, cinco y 16, y se convirtió en la primera jugadora en anotar un triplete en una final de la Copa Mundial Femenina de la FIFA. EE.UU. ahora tiene más goles que ninguna otra nación en Copas Mundiales con 112 (en 5-2). Alemania tiene 111. Lauren Holiday anotó gol en el minuto 14 y Tobin Heath anotó el último en el segundo tiempo para poner el marcador final.

Hope Solo fue otorgada el Guante de Oro como la mejor portera del torneo y Carli Lloyd recibió el Balón de Oro como la mejor jugadora de la Copa Mundial Femenina 2015.

Estados Unidos ahora tiene un registro de 25-1-6 contra Japón en una serie que data desde 1986. Han anotado 92 goles y recibido 22. Estados Unidos y Japón se enfrentaron en una Copa Mundial Femenina por cuarta ocasión y por segunda vez consecutiva en la final. 

Próximamente:
Estados Unidos jugará dos partidos contra Costa Rica en agosto. El 16 de agosto se enfrentarán en Heinz Field en Pittsburg, Pensilvania, a las 1:30 p.m. ET, y el 19 de agosto en Chattanooga, Tennessee, a las 6:30 p.m. CT en Finley Stadium.
Información de transmisión: 16 de agosto (FOX Sports 1); 19 de agosto (ESPN2, WatchESPN)
Social: Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt, @ussoccer_esp); Facebook; Instagram

Resumen de Goles:

USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe), minuto 3: Una jugada de Morgan Brian resultó en un tiro de esquina. Megan Rapinoe envió el balón al área grande y Carli Lloyd hizo una carrera de balazo desde el medio campo, rematando de primera al fondo de la red. USA 1, JPN 0. 

USA – Carli Lloyd, minuto 5: Lauren Holiday tomó el tiro libre desde el lado derecho del área grande, cruzando el balón por el área. La pelota se desvió en una defensa de Japón y Lloyd no duda en disparar. USA 2, JPN 0.

USA – Lauren Holiday, minuto 14: Japón intentó despejar el balón y rebotó mal. Lauren Holiday se abalanzó sobre el balón y le pegó de primera con una fuerza que dejó en el aire a la portera Ayumi Kaihori sin mucha oportunidad de reaccionar. USA 3, JPN 0.

USA – Carli Lloyd, minuto 16: Dos minutos después del riflazo de Holiday, Lloyd completó su hat trick con astucia. Lloyd se apoderó del balón en la mitad estadounidense y dio la vuelta. Vio a Ayumi Kaihori lejos de su marco y mandó un balón bombeado desde el medio campo. Kaihori no pudo retroceder a tiempo y el balón cruzó la línea de gol. USA 4, JPN 0.

JPN - Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi), minuto 27: Nahomi Kawasumi controló el balón por la banda derecha y lo pasó hacia el centro. Yuki Ogimi estaba justo adentro del área grande y Julie Johnston se barrió para interceptar el pase. Sin embargo, no calculó bien y Kawasumi se quedó con el balón a corta distancia de la portería. No dudó  y disparó por un lado de Hope Solo quien no pudo reaccionar a tiempo. USA 4, JPN 1.

JPN – Julie Johnston (autogol), minuto 52: Nahomi Kawasumi envió un tiro libre al área que Julie Johnston saltó para despejar, pero el balón se fue hacia atrás y se mantuvo fuera del alcance de Hope Solo, cruzando la línea de gol. USA 4, JPN 2.

USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian), minuto 54: Lauren Holiday tomó un tiro de esquina del lado izquierdo pero nadie lo recibió en el primer poste y cruzó el área chica. Morgan Brian estaba en el lado derecho del área y lo recortó rápidamente hacia el centro, en donde venía Tobin Heath con velocidad. La mediocampista recibió balón y lo mandó al fondo de la red con potencia. USA 5, JPN 2. FINAL.

Atajadas Claves y Paradas Defensivas:

JPN – Ayumi Kaihori, minuto 24: Alex Morgan recibió un balón por el lado izquierdo y se lo llevó al área. Se quitó a su defensa y disparó, pero el tiro no llevaba mucha fuerza y Kaihori tuvo oportunidad de reaccionar y atajar. 

JPN – Ayumi Kaihori, minuto 50: Carli Lloyd controló bien el balón y afuera del área lo pasó hacia su izquierda para Morgan Brian fuera del área. Brian deslizó un disparo con fuerza desde larga distancia y Kaihori tuvo que desviar por arriba de la portería.

USA – Hope Solo, minuto 76: Japón envió un pase al centro por el lado izquierdo, calculando que llegaba Yuika Sugasawa. Llegó bien Sugasawa por el aire, cabeceando el balón de corta distancia hacia la meta, pero Hope Solo estaba atenta para atajar.

Notas Adicionales y En La Mira:

  • Estados Unidos es el cuarto país en llegar a la final de Copas Mundiales Femeninas en torneos consecutivos (2011 y 2015). Los otros tres son Alemania (2003, 2007), Noruega (1991, 1995) y Japón (2011, 2015).
  • Abby Wambach jugó en su partido 25 en una Copa Mundial Femenina, sobrepasando los 24 de Julie Foudy, Birgit Prinz y Formia. Solamente Kristine Lilly jugó en más partidos mundialistas (30).
  • Carli Lloyd anotó los goles No. 67, 68 y 69 de su carrera. Fue capitana de la Selección Femenina de EE.UU. cuatro veces en Canadá. Es la única jugadora estadounidense en anotar gol en cuatro partidos consecutivos en una Copa Mundial. Dos estadounidenses han anotado en tres partidos consecutivos en una Copa Mundial—Michelle Akers (1991) y Abby Wambach (dos veces, 2003 y 2011).
  • Once jugadoras de EE.UU. han anotado un gol en una Copa Mundial Femenina de la FIFA—Abby Wambach, Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Lloyd, Lauren Holiday, O’Hara, Heather O’Reilly, Lori Chalupny, Shannon Boxx  Tobin Heath y Christen Press.
  • Cinco jugadoras estadounidenses jugaron los 630 minutos en el torneo—las defensas Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg y Becky Sauerbrunn, la mediocampista Carli Lloyd y la portera Hope Solo.
  • Sauerbrunn es la única jugadora en la nómina que ha sido titular en todos los partidos de EE.UU este año. Tiene más minutos (1509) que ninguna otra jugadora en el equipo.
  • La Selección Femenina tiene un registro de 34-4-5 en Copas Mundiales Femeninas de la FIFA, anotando 112 goles en 42 partidos, a comparación de 35 goles de sus rivales.
  • A lo largo del torneo, EE.UU. mantuvo un marcador en cero contra Suecia, Nigeria, Colombia, China y Alemania.

- Resumen de Juego de la Selección Femenina de Estados Unidos -

Encuentro: Selección Femenina de Estados Unidos vs. Japón
Fecha: 5 de julio, 2015
Torneo: Copa Mundial Femenina de la FIFA 2015; Final
Sede: BC Place; Vancouver, Canadá
Asistencia: 53,341
Clima: 77 grados, parcialmente nublado 

Resumen de anotaciones:    1          2          F

USA                                        4          1          5
JPN                                         1          1          2 

USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe)             minuto 3
USA – Carli Lloyd                                          5
USA – Lauren Holiday                                   14
USA – Carli Lloyd                                          16
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi)        27
JPN – Julie Johnston (autogol)                       52
USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian)              54 

Alineaciones:

USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (5-Kelley O’Hara, 61), 13-Alex Morgan (3-Christie Rampone, 86), 17-Tobin Heath (20-Abby Wambach, 79)
Suplentes no utilizadas: 2-Sydney Leroux, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny, 18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press
Directora Técnica: Jill Ellis

JPN: 18-Ayumi Kaihori; 3-Azusa Iwashimizu (10-Homare Sawa, 33), 4-Saki Kumagai, 5-Aya Sameshima, 6-Mizuho Sakaguchi; 8-Aya Miyama (capt.), 9-Nahomi Kawasumi (15-Yuika Sugasawa, 39), 11-Shinobu Ohno (16-Mana Iwabuchi, 60), 13-Rumi Utsugi, 17-Yuki Ogimi, 19-Saori Ariyoshi
Suplentes no utilizadas: 1-Miho Fukumoto, 21-Erina Yamane; 2-Yukari Kinga, 12-Megumi Kamionobe, 20-Yuri Kawamura, 23-Kana Kitahara; 7-Kozue Ando, 14-Asuna Takana, 22-Asano Nagasato
Directora Técnico: Norio Sasaki

Resumen estadístico: USA / JPN
Tiros: 15 / 12
Tiros al arco: 7 / 4
Atajadas: 3 / 2
Tiros de esquina: 7 / 3
Faltas: 14 / 10
Fueras de lugar: 1 / 1 

Resumen de penalidades:

JPN – Homare Sawa (amonestación)                          minuto 82
JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (amonestación)                       85

Árbitros:
Árbitro: Kateryna Monzul (UKR)
Árbitro Asistente 1: Natalia Rachynska (UKR)
Árbitro Asistente 2: Yolanda Parga (ESP)
Cuarto Oficial: Claudia Umpierrez (URU)

Jugadora del Partido Budweiser: Carli Lloyd

World Champions: USA Wins 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup

VANCOUVER, Canada (July 5, 2015) – The U.S. Women’s National Team defeated Japan 5-2 at BC Place on Sunday night to become the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Champion and the first three-time FIFA Women’s World Cup winner. 

In the first 16 minutes of play the USA took a 4-0 lead over Japan after Carli Lloyd netted the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history and Lauren Holiday added a goal to put the USA up by a wide margin. 

Japan ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak at 540 minutes by scoring in the 28th minute. The Asian nation built a bit of momentum early in the second half as Julie Johnston’s defensive clearance instead sent the ball into the USA’s net. However, Tobin Heath responded two minutes later to make it 5-2 and complete the highest scoring Final (seven goals) in FIFA Women’s World Cup history.

Loyd and goalkeeper Hope Solo were awarded the Golden Ball and Golden Glove, as the best player and the best goalkeeper at the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, respectively. It was the second straight Golden Glove award for Solo (she also won it in 2011) and the first for Lloyd. Lloyd became the second American to win the award, joining Carin Jennings, who won it in 1991. 

The USA is now the only country to win three Women’s World Cup and the country to score the most goals (five) in a WWC Final – no other team has scored more than two. 

The WNT will return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, respectively, before embarking on their nationwide celebration tour (details to be announced). 

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe), 3rd minute:
Playing a short corner kick on the ground, Megan Rapinoe sent a ball straight through several Japanese defenders to the middle of the six yard box. Carli Lloyd stormed from the back of the box to time her arrival with the ball perfectly and finished with a left-footed strike to score the fastest goal in FIFA Women’s World Cup Final history. USA 1, JPN 0 

USA – Carli Lloyd, 5th minute: Two minutes later, another set piece play led to a U.S. goal. Lauren Holiday stepped up to take the free kick from the right side of the box and sent a shot to the middle of the box that was flicked on by Julie Johnston through a forest of players before Carli Lloyd found it right in front of the net and tapped it in with the inside of her right foot for the second goal of the game and he fifth of the tournament. USA 2, JPN 0 

USA – Lauren Holiday, 14th minute: The sequence began with Tobin Heath, who sent a pass from the midfield intended for Alex Morgan but had the ball intercepted by Japanese defender Azusa Iwashimizu. Iwashimizu tried to head it out of danger but instead directed the ball up in the air. It came down right in front of Lauren Holiday, who volleyed it in stride with her right foot to net her first goal of the tournament. USA 3, JPN 0

USA – Carli Lloyd, 16th minute: Carli Lloyd intercepted the ball in midfield and touched it past a Japan player. Crossing the midfield line, she launched a shot that caught Japan goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori out of her net. While Kaihori got a hand to the ball, she could not keep it from bouncing off the post and into the back of the net, thus completing the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history. USA 4, JPN 0 

JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi), 28th minute: Nahomi Kawasumi played a great ball from the right channel, spotting teammate Yuki Ogimi inside the box. Ogimi evaded a challenge from Julie Johnston, swiveled around and sent a curling shot beyond the reach of Hope Solo for the Japan’s first goal of the match that ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak. USA 4, JPN 1

JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal), 52nd: Julie Johnston tried to clear a free kick attempt with a header that bounced across the face of goal and nestled inside the far post of Hope Solo’s net for Japan’s second score of the game. USA 4, JPN 2

USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian), 54th: Japan’s goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori  punched a Lauren Holiday corner kick clear to the right side. Kaihori’s punch wasn’t strong enough and the ball landed at Morgan Brian’s feet. Brian cut the ball back into the middle where Tobin Heath used the inside of her foot to one-time Brian’s perfect ball into the back of the net for the final score line. USA 5, JPN 2 (FINAL)

Next on the Schedule: The WNT return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Chattanooga, Tenn., respectively.
Broadcast information: FOX Sports 1 (Aug. 16), ESPN2 (Aug. 19)
Social: Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt@ussoccer_esp); FacebookInstagram

Milestone Watch:

  • The USA becomes the first country to win three FIFA Women’s World Cup titles.
  • Carli Lloyd is the first U.S. WNT player to score in four straight games in a World Cup. She netted a goal against China, Colombia and Germany and three against Japan.
  • Lloyd also became the first woman in a FIFA WWC to score a hat trick in a Final match and scored the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history.
  • Lloyd also became the third U.S. Woman to score a hat trick in WWC play: Carin Jennings Gabarra netted three goals against Germany in 1991 and Akers scored five against Chinese Taipei that same year.
  • Lloyd’s goal in the third minute was the fastest goal scored in a WWC Final game.
  • Lloyd scored both U.S. goals in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game (a 2-1 win over Japan), and the sole goal in the 2008 gold-medal game (1-0 over Brazil). With her three goals against Japan tonight, she became the first American to score in three major-tournament finals.
  • Midfielders Lauren Holiday and Tobin Heath each score their first goals of the tournament. It was Heath’s first goal in a Women’s World Cup.
  • The U.S. WNT finished this year’s tournament with a 34-4-5 all-time in Women’s World Cup play, outscoring its opponents 112-35 in 43 games. The 34 wins, 112 goals scored and the 43 games played are FIFA Women’s World Cup records.
  • With its five goals against Japan, the USA now holds the record for most goals scored in WWC play with 112 – the team scored 14 throughout the tournament. Germany scored 20 in Canada to finish in second with 111.
  • The USA’s five goals were the most any team has scored in a WWC Final. No other team has scored more than two.
  • The USA’s two goals in the first five minutes of the match against Japan was the first time any team scored twice in that span in a WWC game. 

Additional Notes:

  • The game was the third meeting between the USA and Japan in a major tournament Final. The USA now has a 2-0-1 record in those meetings: Wins in 2015 WWC and 2012 Olympics. Tie in 2011 WWC (1-3 PKs).
  • Lloyd leads the U.S. with eight goals in 2015.
  • While Wambach is the USA’s top scorer on the roster with 183 goals, Lloyd is next with 69 career international goals and Morgan has 52. Heather O’Reilly has scored 41.
  • Defender Becky Sauerbrunn is the only player on the roster to start and play every game for the USA in 2015. She has played the most minutes (1,509) of anyone on the team.
  • Five U.S. players played all 630 minutes of the tournament: defenders Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Sauerbrunn, midfielder Carli Lloyd, and goalkeeper Hope Solo.
  • In its last 17 games, the U.S. has surrendered just five goals and has scored 34.
  • Nineteen of the 20 field players on the World Cup roster saw action in the tournament.
  • Coming on as a sub in the second half, Wambach played in her 25th career WWC game, tied for second most all-time with Julie Foudy, Brigit Prinz and Formiga. Only Kristine Lilly has more (30).
  • Lloyd has sole possession of seventh place on the U.S. WNT’s all-time goal scoring list, passing Shannon MacMillan who scored 60 goals in her career. Lloyd, now with 69 goals, is the highest-scoring player in U.S. history who has played exclusively as a midfielder.
  • Hope Solo finished with 10 clean sheets in Women’s World Cup play, tying the record for most by a U.S. goalkeeper and most in World Cup play with Brianna Scurry.
  • Solo now has 136 goalkeeper wins and is the all-time leader in wins for a goalkeeper in U.S. history. Brian Scurry had 133 during her career (1994-2008).
  • Eleven players on the current USA roster have scored in a Women’s World Cup tournament: Tobin Heath, Wambach, Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday, Heather O’Reilly, Lori Chalupny, Shannon Boxx, Christen Press and Kelley O’Hara.
  • For the first time in FIFA WWC history, 24 nations participated at this year’s event, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams. 
  • Fourteen different players have scored for the USA in 2015: Tobin Heath, Lauren Holiday, Kelley O’Hara, Morgan, Wambach, Rodriguez, Press, Johnston, Klingenberg, Megan Rapinoe, Brian, Chalupny, Leroux and Lloyd. 

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
Date: July 5, 2015
Competition: 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Final
Venue: BC Place; Vancouver, Canada
Kickoff: 4 p.m. PT
Attendance: 53,341
Weather: Indoor Stadium

Scoring Summary:   1          2          F
USA                            4          1          5
JPN                             1          1          2

USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe)              3rd minute
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           5
USA – Lauren Holiday                                    14
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           16
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi)         27
JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal)                    52
USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian)               54

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (5-Kelley O’Hara, 61), 13-Alex Morgan (3-Christie Rampone, 86), 17-Tobin Heath (20-Abby Wambach, 79)
Subs Not Used: 2-Sydney Leroux, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny,18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press
Head coach: Jill Ellis
 

JPN: 18-Ayumi Kaihori; 3-Azusa Iwashimizu (10-Homare Sawa, 33), 4-Saki Kumagai, 5-Aya Sameshima, 6-Mizuho Sakaguchi, 8-aya Miyama (C), 9-Nahomi Kawasumi (15-Yuika Sugasawa, 39), 11-Shinobu Ohno (16-Mana Iwabuchi, 60), 13-Rumi Utsugi, 17-Yuki Ogimi, 19-Saori Ariyoshi
Subs Not Used: 1-Miho Fukumoto, 2-Yukari Kinga, 12-Megumi Kamionobe, 14-Asuna Tanaka, 20-Yuri Kawamura, 21-Erina Yamane, 22-Asano Nagasato, 23-Kana Kitahara, 7-Kozue Ando
Head Coach: Norio Sasaki

Stats Summary: USA / JPN
Shots: 15 / 12
Shots on Goal: 7 / 4
Saves: 3 / 2
Corner Kicks: 7 / 3
Fouls: 14 / 10
Offside: 1 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
JPN – Homare Sawa (caution)                      82nd minute
JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (caution)                     85

Officials:
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (UKR)
Assistant Referee 1: Natalia Rachynska (UKR)
Assistant Referee 2: Yolanda Parga (ESP)
Fourth Official: Claudia Umpierrez (URU)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Carli Lloyd

Behind The Crest: Ep. 7 - #USWNT in Canada

The U.S. Women's National Team defeats Germany in the semifinal and flies west to Vancouver. As the team prepares for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final against Japan, Jill Ellis and Abby Wambach reflect on the progress to this point and look forward to the culmination of the journey.

U.S. Fan Support Sets Viewing Records for Semifinal Match

The United States versus Germany semifinal match of the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup became the third most watched women’s soccer match of all-time with 8.4 million viewers, trailing only the USA-China Final in 1999 and USA-Japan Final in 2011.

The #USWNT has felt the fan support in-stadium too.

“The crowds have been outrageous,” veteran forward Abby Wambach said. “I know we are in Canada at the World Cup but it feels like we’re at home. So many of the stadiums have been full of American fans.”

Wambach proceeded to give specifics about the fan support in Montreal against Germany, “with it being a dome, it made it even louder so when that second goal went in it was almost as if the roof came off. I couldn’t be more thankful of all the Americans for crossing the border to come support us. We hope we give you something you can really cheer about today.”

That United States versus Germany match also became the most-watched World Cup semifinal – men’s or women’s – ever in the United States, breaking the mark set by Germany-Italy in the 2006 Men’s World Cup (5.9).

The top markets for the semifinal match were Kansas City and St. Louis (9.3) (Fox Sports). The National Women’s Soccer League team, FC Kansas City boasts a League best four players on the U.S. WNT roster: Lauren Holiday, Heather O’Reilly, Amy Rodriguez and Becky Sauerbrunn.

The highly anticipated 2011 World Cup Final rematch between the United States and Japan at BC Place in Vancouver, kicks off today at 4 p.m. PT and it is already sold-out. Additionally, #FanHQ was packed with Red, White and Blue last night, as fans came out to celebrate the night before the big game. The party continues today at The Commodore Ballroom from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. PT.

The U.S. WNT players feel an extra sense of nationalism with the World Cup Final falling just one day after Independence Day. “It’s always an honor to be playing in a World Cup Final, but it’s even better playing in the World Cup Final the day after the Fourth of July,” said Carli Lloyd. “ We have a special opportunity to give America something extra to celebrate on an already special weekend for our country.”

Lauren Holiday added, “To play this game on the world stage on America’s birthday, there’s just an undeniable sense of pride and patriotism among the group right now.”

The 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final will be broadcast on FOX and Telemundo with coverage beginning at 2 p.m. PT/5 p.m. ET.


U.S. WNT Supporters Take on Vancouver!

U.S. WNT fans flocked from far and wide to #FanHQ in Vancouver in support of the USA at the Women's World Cup Final.  #USAvJPN kicks off tonight at 7 p.m. ET on FOX and Telemundo. 

One More: USA Set to Face Japan for World Cup Glory

U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Final
BC Place; Vancouver, Canada
July 5, 2015 

GRAND FINAL SET FOR VANCOUVER: The U.S. Women’s National Team will compete for the biggest prize in women’s soccer when it takes on Japan in the championship of the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup on Sunday, July 5 at BC Place in Vancouver, Canada. This will be the fourth appearance in a FIFA Women’s World Cup Final for the USA, who previously won it all in 1991 and 1999, and its second straight after it fell short in a shootout against Japan at the 2011 edition. The rematch between the two 2011 finalists will be broadcast live on FOX and Telemundo at 4 p.m. PT (7 p.m. ET). Fans can follow all the action on Twitter @ussoccer_wnt and @ussoccer_esp, and follow the team along its journey on Instagram and on Snapchat (ussoccer_wnt). The USA earned its way into the Final with a 2-0 victory against top-ranked Germany on June 30 in Montreal, while Japan defeated England 2-1 on July 1 in Edmonton 1 to become the second defending WWC champion to return to a Final (Germany did it from 2003 to 2007). The United States can be the first country to win three Women’s World Cup titles, while defending champion Japan can be the second repeat winner.

FANS CREATE HOME FIELD ATMOSPHERE ABROAD: During its run in Canada, the USWNT has played in front of what has felt like six straight home crowds, averaging 35,131 fans per game, all of whom seem to be wearing red, white and blue. The vast majority of the more than 31,000 at Winnipeg Stadium on June 8 and more than 32,000 on June 12 were solidly decked out to rep the stars and stripes. The match against Nigeria at BC Place in Vancouver on June 16 proved to be no different as the crowd of 52,193 fans, most of whom were backing the USA, was the fourth largest to attend a WNT match outside the U.S. Once again, fan support was prominent during the Round of 16 match, and although the crowd was smaller in the mammoth Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, the majority of the 19,000 fans that showed up for USA vs. Colombia swathed in U.S. gear yet again. The quarterfinal against China PR was sold out, and the attendance for the epic USA vs. Germany semifinal showdown did not disappoint, as more than 50,000 fans loudly established their presence with audible chants of “USA, USA, USA” across the massive Olympic Stadium in Montreal. BC Place, where more than 52,000 fans saw the USA clinch first place in its group two weeks ago, is set to host the final of this year’s tournament and the sell-out attendance is once again expected to be record-breaking.

WORLD CUP GETTING HUGE TV NUMBERS: The 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup is getting excellent TV ratings and increasing for every match, proving the growing popularity of the tournament and the sport. FOX scored a new high for its soccer coverage when an average audience of 5.7 million tuned in to watch the United States beat China in the quarterfinal match on June 26. The match was also the third most-watched women’s soccer match on record in the United States, after the 1999 and 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup finals. Four days later however, the record was broke again as the USA vs. Germany semifinal on June 30 hit an average of 8.4 million viewers, establishing yet another soccer record as the most viewed semifinal ever in the U.S. (men or women) and third-most watched women’s soccer match of all time. The upward audience trend, which began in the group stage, only has continue to sky rocket, and with a rematch of the 2011 Final set for Sunday, numbers are promising to reach new heights. The six USA matches on FOX and FOX Sports 1 have averaged 5.3 million viewers, 121% better than the 2011 tournament average through the semifinals (2.4 million) on ESPN.

WE MEET AGAIN: The USA and reigning World Champion Japan will meet in the Final of the FIFA Women’s World Cup for the second consecutive tournament. This will be the third meeting between both sides in major international tournament finals, following the 2011 FIFA WWC Final and the 2012 London Olympics gold medal game. The USA and Japan split those meetings, with the USA redeeming its 2011 penalty kick loss with a gold medal winning performance in 2012. After six games at this year’s tournament, both teams, the one looking for its third title since 1999, and the other looking to defend its crown, will go at it in a seventh match (the most games ever needed to be played in a FIFA WWC to win it all) in the hopes to collect the ultimate prize in women’s soccer.

FOUR U.S. PLAYERS ON SHORTLISTS FOR FIFA AWARDS: FIFA has announced it candidates for end-of-the tournament awards and the U.S. WNT candidates for the Golden Ball as best player in the competition are defender Julie Johnston, midfielder Carli Lloyd and midfielder Megan Rapinoe. Hope Solo is also among three candidates for the Golden Glove awarded to the top net-minder in the tournament, an honor she won at the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

  • CARLI LLOYD: Lloyd, who has played every minute of the tournament, has scored a goal in the last three knockout round matches for the U.S. including two game-winners. The veteran midfielder opened her scoring in the tournament against Colombia converting a penalty kick. The following match, Lloyd notched the game-winning header against China off a Johnston service. Most recently, Lloyd buried her second PK of the tournament in a 2-0 victory over Germany and added an assist on Kelley O’Hara’s clinching goal vs. Germany, her first in international play.
  • JULIE JOHNSTON: Johnston has played every minute as a member of the U.S. backline that is carrying a 513-minute shutout streak and has allowed just one goal through six games. She registered the assist on Carli Lloyd’s headed goal against China PR in the quarterfinals.
  • MEGAN RAPINOE: Rapinoe was the game changer for the United States in their opening match of the World Cup scoring two goals in America’s 3-1 victory over Australia. She’s notched an assist as well and despite being suspended for the quarterfinal due to yellow card accumulation, has been a consistently dynamic threat up and down the wing for the USA.
  • HOPE SOLO: Solo has allowed just one goal through six matches and has played an integral role in the U.S. shutout streak. She’s been an immense presence on a well-organized backline and been a crucial part of the USA’s defensive resolve throughout the tournament. With another shutout, Solo would have 11 in Women’s World Cup play and set an all-time tournament record.

U.S. ROSTER NOTES:

  • Sunday’s match features the two oldest teams in the history of the Women’s World Cup tournament with the U.S averaging 29-years-old and six months and Japan having the average age of 28-years-old and five months.
  • Midfielder Carli Lloyd has scored in three straight games for the WNT at this year’s World Cup (Colombia, China and Germany). Her goal in the second half against Germany on June 30 was her fourth career World Cup strike and her 66th overall. She has captained the USA three times in Canada. She is the third U.S. WNT player to score in three straight games in a World Cup, joining Michelle Akers (1991) and Abby Wambach (twice; in 2003 and 2011). No American has scored in four straight Women’s World Cup games.
  • Lloyd scored both U.S. goals in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game (a 2-1 win over Japan), and the sole goal in the 2008 gold-medal game (1-0 over Brazil). No American has scored in three major-tournament finals (Wambach could also score in her third on Sunday).
  • Kelley O’Hara made her debut in this year’s tournament when she started against China PR on June 26. It was O’Hara’s first career start in a World Cup match. She had only played one game before, 18 minutes as a substitute in 2011 vs. Sweden. She made her second appearance at this year’s tournament when she came in as a second half substitute in the match against Germany and scored her first World Cup goal. It came in the 84th minute to seal the game and propel the USA to the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final.
  • Since allowing a goal against Australia in its opening match on June 8 in the 27th minute, the U.S. has shut out Sweden, Nigeria, Colombia, China and Germany – a stretch of 513 consecutive minutes.  
  • Defender Becky Sauerbrunn is the only player on the roster to start and play every game for the USA in 2015. She has played the most minutes (1,419) on the team.
  • Five U.S. players have played all 540 minutes of the tournament so far: defenders Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg and Sauerbrunn, midfielder Lloyd, and goalkeeper Hope Solo.
  • In 16 games played this year, the U.S. has surrendered just three goals and has scored 29. The USA hasn’t lost a match since dropping its opening game of 2015 on Feb. 8 to France.
  • The USA is the fourth country to reach consecutive Women's World Cup finals (2011 and 2015). The other three are Germany (2003, 2007), Norway (1991, 1995) and Japan (2011, 2015).
  • After coming on as a sub in the second half of the game against Germany on June 30, Abby Wambach played in her 24th career WWC game, tied for second most all-time with Julie Foudy, Birgit Prinz and Formiga. Only Kristine Lilly has more (30).
  • Alex Morgan scored her first goal in this year’s Women’s World Cup against Colombia. Morgan now has three goals in 2015 and 52 international goals in her career. She has scored a total of three World Cup goals after scoring twice in 2011.
  • Before her start against Nigeria in the final group match, Morgan had only played 25 minutes in the tournament, coming off the bench against Australia and Sweden for 12 and 13 minutes, respectively, before playing 65 minutes against Nigeria. After playing 90 minutes vs. Colombia, 80 against China, and 89 against Germany she has now played a total of 349 minutes.
  • Twelve different players have scored for the USA in 2015: Kelley O’Hara, Morgan, Wambach, Amy Rodriguez, Christen Press, Johnston, Klingenberg, Megan Rapinoe, Morgan Brian, Lori Chalupny, Sydney Leroux and Lloyd.
  • Brian, Klingenberg, Johnston, Leroux and Press all made their World Cup debuts against Australia on June 8. All played against Sweden on June 12 as well, with Brian getting her first start. Klingenberg, Johnston and Leroux all saw action against Nigeria on June 16, while Brian, Klingenberg, Johnston and Press saw action against Colombia on June 22. Brian, Klingenberg and Johnston all started against China and Germany on June 26 and June 30, respectively, and Leroux came in as a second half stoppage time against Germany.
  • Press and Leroux also recorded their first World Cup points on June 8, with Press scoring a goal and Leroux an assist. Johnston recorded her first World Cup point against China on June 26 when she assisted on Lloyd’s goal. It was Johnston’s first assist with the WNT.
  • So far, 19 of the 20 field players on the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup roster have seen action in the tournament.
  • Amy Rodriguez made her first appearance of the tournament on June 12 against Sweden, and her first start of the tournament on June 26 against China. Defender Lori Chalupny made her first appearance of the 2015 World Cup when she came in for Ali Krieger in the second half against Colombia on June 22. It was the seventh World Cup appearance of her career.
  • Heather O’Reilly played the last 10 minutes of the game against China on June 26 after coming in as a sub for Alex Morgan. It was O’Reilly’s 12th World Cup appearance of her career.
  • Shannon Boxx and Christie Rampone made their first appearance of the tournament against Nigeria on June 16. Rampone became the oldest player to appear in a World Cup match at 39 years 11 months and 23 days. This is Boxx’s fourth World Cup and Rampone’s fifth.
  • Forward Abby Wambach leads the U.S. with six goals in 2015.
  • Chalupny scored against New Zealand in her hometown of St. Louis on April 4, marking it her first goal for the USA since she scored against the Republic of Ireland on Sept. 20, 2008. She scored her second goal of the year against Mexico on May 17, just 45 seconds after coming into the match as a second half sub.
  • Klingenberg scored her second National Team goal on a long-range blast against New Zealand. Her first goal was a similar long-range effort that came against Haiti on Oct. 8, during Women’s World Cup qualifying tournament last year.
  • Johnston has three goals in 2015, all coming in consecutive games. Her three goals were all from set pieces and all assisted by Holiday.
  • Rampone earned her 300th cap against with Mexico on Oct. 24, 2014, and her 307 games are the most of any active player in the world behind only former teammate Kristine Lilly.
  • Holiday leads all U.S. players on the rosters in assists with five in 2015. Holiday was the 2014 U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year.
  • Brian, the USA’s youngest player at age 22, was the 2014 U.S. Soccer Young Female Athlete of the Year. She was also named the 2013 and 2014 Hermann Trophy winner while playing for the University of Virginia.
  • While Wambach is the USA’s top scorer on the roster with 183 goals, Lloyd is next with 66 career international goals and Morgan has 52. Heather O’Reilly has scored 41.
  • Christen Press’ four-goal performance against Argentina in Brazil last December was the ninth such game in U.S. history and second of 2014 after Wambach scored four times against Costa Rica in the final of the CONCACAF Women’s Championship. It was the first-career hat trick for Press.
  • All nine NWSL clubs are represented on the Women’s World Cup roster.

IN THE RECORD BOOKS:

  • Carli Lloyd became the 10th woman in U.S. history to reach 200 caps during the quarterfinal match against China PR on June 26. She is the fourth player on this World Cup roster to reach that mark. Christie Rampone, Abby Wambach and Heather O’Reilly are the other three. She also became the third player in U.S. history to score in her 200th appearance. Wambach and O’Reilly are the other two.
  • Lloyd has sole possession of seventh place on the U.S. WNT’s all-time goal scoring list, passing Shannon MacMillan who scored 60 goals in her career. Lloyd, now with 66 goals, is the highest-scoring player in U.S. history who has played exclusively as a midfielder.
  • Hope Solo recorded her 89th career shutout against Germany. It was the fifth straight World Cup clean sheet for the USA, and Solo’s 10th in World Cup play, tying the record for most by a U.S. goalkeeper and most in World Cup play with Brianna Scurry.
  • Solo also earned her 176th cap against Germany on June 30. She is the leader for caps by a goalkeeper in U.S. history. Briana Scurry earned 173 caps in her career (1994-2008).
  • Solo has the most starts by a WNT goalkeeper with 170. Solo is also in 10th place on the WNT’s all-time starts list and behind ninth place Carli Lloyd, who has 173.
  • Solo has 135 goalkeeper wins and is the all-time leader in wins for a goalkeeper in U.S. history. Brian Scurry had 133 during her career (1994-2008).
  • With her first goal of the game against Australia on June 8, U.S. midfielder Megan Rapinoe became the 13th U.S. female player to score 30 goals and tally 30 assists. She currently has 31 goals and 33 assists. Her brace against Australia were her first tallies of 2015.
  • Rapinoe became the 31st American female player to reach the century mark in caps, achieving that feat against New Zealand on April 4. She currently has 107 caps. Lori Chalupny became the 32nd player against Ireland on May 10.
  • Heather O’Reilly was the ninth player to hit 200 caps in U.S. history after reaching the milestone against Korea DPR on March 12, 2014. Now with 220, she is seventh on the USA’s all-time list. Abby Wambach (248) and Christie Rampone (307) are the only active players ahead of her.
  • O’Reilly is the second-youngest player to hit 200 caps for the USA. Lilly was 28 years, 9 months and 15 days old when she earned cap No. 200 on May 7, 2000. O’Reilly was 29 years, 2 months and 10 days old when she earned her 200th cap.
  • O’Reilly is currently sixth all-time in assists with 52 and is 13th all-time in goals with 41.
  • In addition to breaking Mia Hamm’s world scoring record, Wambach’s June 20, 2013, performance against the Korea Republic also made her the USA’s all-time leader in multiple-goal games with 39 for her career. She has since added six more and now sits at 45. She has 37 two-goal games, five hat tricks, two four-goal games and one five-goal game.
  • Sydney Leroux is tied with April Heinrichs in 14th place on the all-time U.S. WNT goal-scoring list with 35 goals.
  • With her game-winning goal against England on Feb. 13, Alex Morgan became the 10th player in U.S. history to score 50 or more goals. She now has 52.

2015 FIFA WOMEN’S WORLD CUP NOTES:

  • After scoring three times against Australia in its opening match of the 2015 FIFA WWC, the USA became the second country to reach and then surpass the century mark of World Cup goals scored. The USA currently has scored 107 WWC goals. Christen Press had the honor of scoring the 100th goal in U.S. Women’s World Cup history. Germany scored 10 goals in its opener on June 7 to hit 101 and become the first team to pass 100. The Germans currently have 111 goals after scoring 20 in this tournament, 14 of which came against Ivory Coast and Thailand.
  • The USA has allowed 14 shots on goal over the 540 minutes of action so far and allowed just one against Sweden and Germany, and two against Nigeria, Colombia and China.
  • The draw with Sweden was the first scoreless draw in U.S. history during group play in a World Cup. It was the second overall scoreless draw for the USA in a World Cup (0-0 against China in the 1999 WWC Final).
  • The USA is making its seventh appearance in a FIFA Women’s World Cup and is one of seven countries to appear in all seven editions of the tournament, the others being Brazil, Germany, Japan, Nigeria, Norway and Sweden. For the second straight WWC Final, the USA and Japan will contend for the tournament title.
  • The U.S. is the only country to have reached semifinals of every FIFA Women’s World Cup. The USA won in 1991 and 1999.
  • The USA will be making its fourth appearance in a FIFA Women’s World Cup Final, the only country to reach it that many times (Germany has reached it on three occasions).
  • Abby Wambach has played in 24 WWC matches, the most on the 2015 WWC roster. Christie Rampone has played in 18 Women’s World Cup games while Carli Lloyd has played in 17, Shannon Boxx and Hope Solo have played in 16. Other players in double figures in Women’s World Cup matches are Ali Krieger and Heather O’Reilly with 12; Alex Morgan, Lauren Holiday and Megan Rapinoe with 11.
  • The U.S. WNT has won its group in the World Cup every year except 2011, when it finished second to Sweden.
  • The 90,185 spectators on hand at the Rose Bowl for the USA’s victory against China PR in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup represent the largest attendance in the tournament’s history. The largest venue at the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup is Olympic Stadium, which seats 66,308.
  • With her first-half goal against Nigeria, Abby Wambach moved into a tie with Germany’s Birgit Prinz for 2nd all-time with 14 World Cup goals. Brazil’s Marta is the leader with 15 goals, including one in this tournament. With Brazil out of this tournament, Wambach has a chance to tie Marta or break the record should she score in the final.
  • Wambach has scored in every World Cup group stage in which she has played (2003, 2007, 2011 and 2015). She has scored seven goals, tallying three in final group stage matches.
  • Ten players on the current USA roster have scored in a Women’s World Cup tournament: Wambach, Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday, Heather O’Reilly, Lori Chalupny, Shannon Boxx, Christen Press and Kelley O’Hara.
  • The U.S. WNT is 33-4-5 all-time in the Women’s World Cup, outscoring its opponents 107-33 in 42 games. The 33 wins and 42 games played are FIFA Women’s World Cup records.
  • The USA’s most lopsided victory in the tournament was a 7-0 win against Chinese Taipei in 1991.
  • Michelle Akers’ five goals against Chinese Taipei are the most in a single match in tournament history.
  • The U.S. holds two other individual records with Kristine Lilly playing a record 30 games in five World Cups and goalkeeper Briana Scurry earning a record 10 shutouts.
  • For the first time in FIFA WWC history, 24 nations participated at this year’s event, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams. 

LAST TIME

On the field for the USA:
June 30, 2015 – Olympic Stadium; Montreal, Canada (2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup)

USA     2          Lloyd, 69; O’Hara 84
GER     0          

Lineups:
USA:  1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (20-Abby Wambach,80), 13-Alex Morgan (2-Sydney Leroux, 90+3), 17-Tobin Heath (5-Kelley O’Hara, 75) 
Subs Not Used: 3-Christie Rampone, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny,18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press 
Head coach: Jill Ellis 
 

GER : 1-Nadine Angerer (capt.); 4-Leonie Maier, 5-Annike Krahn, 3-Saskia Bartusiak, 22-Tabea Kemme; 6-Simone Laudehr, 20-Lena Goessling, 11-Anja Mittag (10-Dzsenifer Marozsan, 78), 16-Melanie Leupolz, 18-Alexandra Popp; 13-Celia Sasic 
Subs not used: 2-Bianca Schmidt, 7-Melanie Behringer, 8-Pauline Bremer, 9-Lena Lotzen, 12-Almuth Schult, 14-Babett Peter, 15-Jennifer Cramer, 17-Josephine Henning, 19-Lena Petermann, 21-Laura Benkarth, 23-Sara Daebritz 
Head coach: Silvia Neid

Results

Date Matchup Result Venue Attendance Goal Scorers
June 15, 2008 MNT vs Barbados 8-0 W The Home Depot Center; Carson, Calif. 11,476 Dempsey (2), Bradley, Ching (2), Donovan, Own Goal, Johnson
June 22, 2008 MNT vs Barbados 1-0 W Kensington Oval; Bridgetown, Barbados 2,000 Lewis
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