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Second Day of 2005 Nike Friendlies Wraps Up in Bradenton As Action For 65 Teams Carries Over to Weekend


U.S. Under-17 '90s Fall to Brazil 1-0 During Second Day of Nike Friendlies;
U.S. Under-15 BNT Falls to U-16 Concorde Fire

BRADENTON, Fla. (December 2, 2005) — The U.S. Under-17 ’90 Men’s National Team hit the post twice in the second half, but couldn’t find the back of the net and eventually fell 1-0 to Brazil in their first international match on American soil during the second day of the 2005 Nike Friendlies.

The match was taped by Fox Soccer Channel and will be broadcast December 21 at 11 p.m. ET.

The U.S. was on their heels early in the match as Brazil came out firing, but soon started to pick up their play during an intense affair. U.S. goalkeeper Josh Lambo was the most impressive player for the hosts, coming up with six saves in the first half to keep the game scoreless when the teams headed to the locker room. Overall, Lambo had nine saves on the day, most of which required an impressive effort from the ‘keeper after making 10 stops one day earlier vs. the same Brazil side.

In the 53rd minute, Kirk Urso sent a cross into the box for Sheanon Williams, who headed the ball on frame, but Marcelo made a sprawling save to parry it over the bar.

Brazil finally broke through the U.S. defense in the 68th minute when Fabio dribbled down the left flank and was able to keep possession despite a well-timed tackle by Alex Dixon, before crossing the ball into the area. Maicon made a near post run and hit a one-timer from the six-yard box past Lambo.

Six minutes earlier, it looked as though Ellis McLoughlin was going to give the U.S. the lead, but his attempt hit the post. Danny Barerra lofted the ball over the Brazilian backline for McLoughlin to run onto and he chipped the ‘keeper, but the ball hit the right post and was eventually cleared out.

Maicon came up big once again in the 75th minute when Jared Jeffries sent McLoughlin into the area with just the ‘keeper to beat, getting low to stop the driven attempt.

McLoughlin had another great opportunity during injury time, but his close range attempt went off the crossbar. Thomas Meyer sent in a ball from the halfway line and the ball fell to Victor Yanez on the left side of the area. Yanez passed the ball to his right for McLoughlin directly in front of the goal, but his attempt went high and skimmed over the crossbar.

ALL_ACCESS VIDEO - ARVIZU BICYCLE KICK: Day one of the 2005 Nike Friendlies was highlighted by U.S. U-17 MNT forward David Arvizu's amazing bicycle kick goal against the Dallas Texans. Check out Arvizu's goal  and hear from several Nike Premier club players participating in the annual event in ussoccer.com's latest all_access video.

PODCAST - CATCH UP WITH U-17 MNT: The U-17 Men's National Team hasn't had much down time since their thrilling run through the 2005 U-17 World Championship in Peru. Whether it's training with club teams both in the U.S. and abroad, rehabbing injuries or gearing up for this year's Nike Friendlies, John Hackworth's squad has kept plenty busy. Catch up with the U-17 MNT in this exclusive podcast.

U.S. U-15 BNT FALL TO U-16 CONCORDE FIRE: The U.S. U-15 BNT fell to the U-16 Concorde Fire, 2-0, in their second game of the Nike Friendlies. Riley Sumpter put Concorde ahead in the fourth minute and Eduardo Gonzalez added the second goal in the 63rd minute. The U-15 boys take the field again at 10 a.m. on Saturday, December 3, against the Scott Gallagher U-16 squad.

RESULTS ARE IN AS FRIENDLIES HIT HALFWAY POINT: The 2005 Nike Friendlies reached its halfway point on Friday evening as the club teams from across the country settle in for the weekend portion of the four-day annual event. U-18 Real Colorado's Bongomin Otii set the goal-scoring standard on the day with a hat trick vs. Concorde Fire as all the players in attendance continued to showcase for the more than 150 college coaches attending the event's first two days.

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