US SoccerUS Soccer

March 2007 Archive (I of II)


ARTIFICIAL AIDS

Question:
What do you think about sticky stuff on the goalkeeper's gloves? I believe it is covered on throw in and the players using the ribbed gloves, but I have not had anything come up on goalkeepers. My gut-feel is that it is unsporting behavior.

Answer (March 12, 2007):
The goalkeeper is allowed certain exceptions in the equipment he or she is permitted to wear. These exceptions for the goalkeeper are designed strictly for protection of the goalkeeper, who is often expected to dive quickly to the ground. Law 4 is meant to ensure player safety, not player superiority through artificial means. There is no provision for the goalkeeper or any other player to wear artificial aids to enhance their ability to play. Therefore tacky substances on the hands or "sticky" gloves are illegal equipment and, if used, constitute unsporting behavior for which a caution should be given. The offending substance must be removed and offending gloves may be replaced by others that are not "doctored."

 


REFEREE SHOES

Question:
I know the referee's shoes should be black and the white brand logo is allowed. Is there any other part of the shoe that could be a different color like the top heel area, or does the entire shoe have to be completely black. Can a the cleat be mostly black, but have white areas?

Answer (March 8, 2007):
Traditionally, referee shoes were all black, in keeping with the original referee uniform which was also almost all black. Referees should select their shoes with an eye for both utility and appearance. The referee has to run on the field with at least as much speed and agility as does a player and so the shoes should enable them to do this under all field conditions. Players, team officials, and spectators often make initial judgments about the skills and knowledge of the referee based on appearance, and shoes can contribute significantly toward building that reserve of confidence. It is also occasionally important that players, who are frequently looking down at the ground, be able to identify the referee quickly by differences in the shoes. Accordingly, the referee's shoes should be predominantly black, clean, polished, and neatly tied. Small manufacturer's logos in white or a color that does not attract too much attention are acceptable. Designs and colors which unnecessarily call attention to the referee are strongly discouraged. In addition, all referees on any particular game should strive to make their dress, including shoes, as uniform as possible. Finally, referees must also consider any requirements for equipment established by the competitions in which they officiate, e. g., the professional leagues. As referees find themselves officiating more competitive matches, these guidelines become more important.

 


WHY NO OFFSIDE DIRECTLY FROM A GOAL KICK?

Question:
I have one question? I was holding an entry level class and a student asked about the following. One cannot be offside if they receive a ball directly from a goal kick,even if they are about 25 yards from the opponents goal, but one can be offside if there was a DFK from the 19 yard line and the opponents tried for an offside trap. A person was asking for the rationale behind it. I could only reply that the law provided for one but not the other, but not a reason why. Can you help me?

Answer (March 7, 2007):
There is no known documentation regarding the reason for this exemption of the goal kick (or of the throw-in or corner kick). These exemptions were installed in the Laws in the 1880s. One possibility is that these exemptions have in common a method of putting the ball into play after it has passed beyond the boundary lines. In other words, a technical procedure. Another possibility is that it was an early attempt to increase goalscoring possibilities. Yet a third possibility is that it would be extremely rare for a goal to be scored directly from a goal kick, although that possibility now exists with the changes in the Laws of 1997.

 


MAY THE REFEREE ISSUE A CAUTION AFTER THE GAME HAS ENDED?

Question:
I am the president of a soccer club that plays its matches in [a state association]. Yesterday, one of our players received a yellow card for unsporting behavior after the final whistle had blown for the match to be completed. The player was upset at the frequent calling of "unjustified" offsides, and left the pitch without permission in the closing seconds.

Is it legitimate for a referee to issue cards after a match?

Answer (February 28, 2007):
Yes, it is, provided that the teams have not completely left the field. Here are the instructions we give our referees, taken from the USSF publication "Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game":
QUOTE
3.21 DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER THE GAME
Misconduct committed by a player or a substitute prior to the start of the match, during the match, during breaks between playing periods is subject to a formal caution or a send-off, as appropriate. Yellow and red cards, which are now mandatory indications of cautions and send-offs, may be shown only for misconduct committed by players, substitutes, or substituted players during a match. "During a match" includes:
(a) the period of time immediately prior to the start of play during which players and substitutes are physically on the field warming up, stretching, or otherwise preparing for the match;
(b) any periods in which play is temporarily stopped;
(c) half time or similar breaks in play;
(d) required overtime periods;
(e) kicks from the penalty mark if this procedure is used in case a winner must be determined.
(f) the period of time immediately following the end of play during which the players and substitutes are physically on the field but in the process of exiting.
//deleted//
Postgame: Any misconduct committed by players or substitutes after the field has been cleared must be described in the game report and reported to the competition authority. Since such misconduct cannot result in a formal caution or send-off, no card may be displayed. Referees are advised to avoid remaining in the area of the field unnecessarily.
END OF QUOTE

The fact that the player left the field of play without permission before the match warranted a caution, as the match had not yet been completed. The referee's action was within the requirements of the Law.

 


U.S. Soccer thanks Jim Allen (National Instructor Staff/National Assessor), assisted by Dan Heldman (National Instructor Staff), for their assistance in providing this service.

Submit your questions via e-mail to askareferee@ussoccer.org.


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