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Seattle Sounders FC, Sporting Kansas City Set for U.S. Open Cup Final on Wednesday


Match Kicks Off at 8 p.m. CT at LIVESTRONG Sporting Park in Kansas City, Kan., Televised on GolTV

Sporting Kansas City vs. Seattle Sounders FC – 2012 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup
LIVESTRONG Sporting Park; Kansas City, Kan.
Aug. 8, 2012

SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC AND SPORTING KANSAS CITY SET FOR U.S. OPEN CUP FINAL: The Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup Final figures to be an exciting clash between two Major League Soccer sides as Sporting Kansas City hosts three-time defending champion Seattle Sounders FC at 8 p.m. CT (9 p.m. ET) on Wed., Aug. 8, at LIVESTRONG Sporting Park in Kansas City, Kan. The match will be broadcast live on GolTV. Fans can also follow live updates on ussoccer.com’s Match Tracker and on Twitter @ussoccer.

Seattle is shooting for its fourth straight crown, which would be an unprecedented streak in the 99-year history of the tournament. Kansas City is vying for its second Dewar Challenge Trophy after winning the 2004 title as the Kansas City Wizards. The last time the U.S. Open Cup title game was held in August, the Richmond Kickers defeated the El Paso Patriots in a 4-2 shootout on Aug. 27, 1995, in El Paso, Texas.

SPORTING KANSAS CITY ROSTER BY POSITION
GOALKEEPERS (3): 1-Jimmy Nielsen, 18-Eric Kronberg, 21-Jon Kempin
DEFENDERS (12): 2-Michael Harrington, 3-Korede Aiyegbusi, 4-Kevin Ellis, 5-Matt Besler, 12-Konrad Warzycha, 13-Lawrence Olum, 16-Seth Sinovic, 24-Cyprian Hedrick, 25-Neven Markovic, 27-Kyle Miller, 55-Julio Cesar, 78-Aurelien Collin
MIDFIELDERS (7): 6-Paulo Nagamura, 7-Chance Myers, 8-Graham Zusi, 15-Roger Espinoza, 19-Peterson Joseph, 20-Oriol Rosell, 88-Michael Thomas
FORWARDS (7): 9-Teal Bunbury, 11-Bobby Convey, 14-Dom Dwyer, 17-C.J. Sapong, 22-Soony Saad, 23-Kei Kamara, 37-Jacob Peterson

SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC ROSTER BY POSITION
GOALKEEPERS (4): 1-Michael Gspurning, 29-Josh Ford, 33-Andrew Weber, 35-Bryan Meredith
DEFENDERS (9): 4-Patrick Ianni, 5-Adam Johansson, 8-Marc Burch, 12-Leonardo Gonzalez, 20-Zach Scott, 30-Andrew Duran, 31-Jeff Parke, 32-Daniel Steres, 34-Jhon Kennedy Hurtado
MIDFIELDERS (9): 3-Brad Evans, 6-Osvaldo Alonso, 10-Mauro Rosales, 13-Christian Tiffert, 14-Michael Tetteh, 22-Mike Seamon, 23-Servando Carrasco, 25-Andy Rose, 27-Alex Caskey
FORWARDS (7): 7-Eddie Johnson, 11-Steve Zakuani, 16-David Estrada, 17-Fredy Montero, 19-Babayele Sodade, 21-Cordell Cato, 26-Sammy Ochoa

ROAD TO 2012 U.S. OPEN CUP TITLE GAME:
Sporting Kansas City

  • Third Round (May 29): Sporting Kansas City (MLS) 3, Orlando City Soccer Club (USL PRO) 2: Scoring: SKC – Paulo Nagamura 45+2; Soony Saad 65, 68; ORL – Kevin Molino 55; Dennis Chin 84
  • Fourth Round (June 5): Sporting Kansas City (MLS) 2, Colorado Rapids (MLS) 0: Scoring: SKC – Own goal (Matt Pickens) 27; Teal Bunbury 79
  • Quarterfinal Round (June 26): Sporting Kansas City (MLS) 3, Dayton Dutch Lions (USL PRO) 0: Scoring: SKC – C.J. Sapong 5, 59; Graham Zusi 56
  • Semifinal Round (July 11): Sporting Kansas City (MLS) 2, Philadelphia Union (MLS) 0: Scoring: SKC – Jacob Peterson 65, Graham Zusi 90+

Seattle Sounders FC

  • Third Round (May 20): Seattle Sounders FC (MLS) 5, Atlanta Silverbacks (NASL) 1: SEA – Andy Rose 44; Osvaldo Alonso 47; Alex Caskey 54; Sammy Ochoa 62, 66; ATL – Reinaldo Navia 53
  • Fourth Round (June 5): Seattle Sounders FC (MLS) 5, Cal FC (USASA) 0: Scoring: SEA – Osvaldo Alonso (PK) 50, 70; Fredy Montero 58, 68; Andy Rose 66
  • Quarterfinal Round (July 11): Seattle Sounders FC (MLS) 1, San Jose Earthquakes (MLS) 0: SEA – Cordell Cato 19
  • Semifinal Round (July 11): Seattle Sounders FC (MLS) 4, Chivas USA (MLS) 1: Scoring: SEA – Eddie Johnson 31, Osvaldo Alonso (PK) 48, Brad Evans 83, Sammy Ochoa 88; CHV – Cesar Romero 74

2012 U.S. OPEN CUP GOALSCORING LEADERS: Brian Shriver of the Carolina RailHawks (NASL) currently leads the scoring bunch with five goals as the RailHawks advanced to the fourth round of the 2012 U.S. Open Cup. Four goals came during the team’s 6-0 victory against PSA Elite (USASA) in the second round and his fifth goal was the game-winner against the LA Galaxy in the third round. Seattle Sounders FC’s Osvaldo Alonso has an opportunity to match or surpass Shriver as he sits on four goals entering Wednesday’s title game:

5 – Brian Shriver (Carolina RailHawks)
4 – Danny Barrera (Cal FC)
4 – Osvaldo Alonso (Seattle Sounders FC)
4 – Francisco Lopez (Ventura County Fusion)
3 – Artur Aghasyan (Cal FC)
3 – Nate Thornton (Charlotte Eagles)
3 – Aly Hassan (Fort Lauderdale Strikers)
3 – Brian Ombiji (Harrisburg City Islanders)
3 – Sainey Touray (Harrisburg City Islanders)
3 – Freddy Adu (Philadelphia Union)
3 – Sammy Ochoa (Seattle Sounders FC)
2 – 28 players tied*

* Seattle Sounders FC’s Fredy Montero and Andy Rose, Sporting Kansas City’s Soony Saad, C.J. Sapong and Graham Zusi each have two goals entering the final

MOST U.S. OPEN CUP CHAMPIONSHIPS: Seattle Sounders FC enters this year’s final tied for seventh all-time with three championships:

5 – Bethlehem Steel of Pa. (1915, 1916, 1918, 1919, 1926)
5 – Fall River Marksmen of Mass. (1924, 1927, 1930, 1931, 1932) – ’32 team was New Bedford Whalers
5 – Los Angeles Maccabee SC (1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1981)
4 – Chicago Fire (1998, 2000, 2003, 2006)
4 – New York Greek-Americans (1967, 1968, 1969, 1974)
4 – Philadelphia Ukrainian Nationals (1960, 1961, 1963, 1966)
3 – New York Pancyprian-Freedoms (1980, 1982, 1983)
3 – Seattle Sounders FC (2009, 2010, 2011)
3 – St. Louis Stix, Baer and Fuller FC (1933, 1934, 1935) – 1935 team was St. Louis Central Breweries

2012 U.S. OPEN CUP FIELD:
Professional Teams (32 total):

  • Major League Soccer (Division I – 16 teams): Chicago Fire, Chivas USA, Colorado Rapids, Columbus Crew, D.C. United, FC Dallas, Houston Dynamo, LA Galaxy, New England Revolution, New York Red Bulls, Philadelphia Union, Portland Timbers, Real Salt Lake, San Jose Earthquakes, Seattle Sounders FC, Sporting Kansas City.
  • North American Soccer League (Division II – 6 teams): Atlanta Silverbacks, Carolina RailHawks, Fort Lauderdale Strikers, Minnesota Stars FC, San Antonio Scorpions, Tampa Bay Rowdies.
  • USL PRO (Division III – 10 teams): Charleston Battery, Charlotte Eagles, Dayton Dutch Lions, Harrisburg City Islanders, Los Angeles Blues, Orlando City, Pittsburgh Riverhounds, Richmond Kickers, Rochester Rhinos, Wilmington Hammerheads.

Amateur-Level Teams (32 total):

  • U.S. Adult Soccer Association Regional Qualifiers – 9 teams: ASC New Stars, Cal FC, Croatian Eagles, Dulles Sportsplex Aegean Hawks FC, Jersey Shore Boca, K.C. Athletics, NTX Rayados, N.Y. Greek Americans, PSA Elite
  • United Soccer Leagues Premier Development League – 16 teams: Carolina Dynamo, Chicago Fire PDL, Des Moines Menace, El Paso Patriots, Fresno Fuego, GPS Portland Phoenix, Kitsap Pumas, Laredo Heat, Long Island Rough Riders, Michigan Bucks, Mississippi Brilla FC, Orlando City U-23s, Portland Timbers U-23s, Reading United AC, Real Colorado Foxes, Ventura County Fusion
  • National Premier Soccer League (6 teams): Brooklyn Italians, FC Sonic, Fullerton Rangers, Georgia Revolution, Jacksonville United, Milwaukee Bavarians
  • US Club Soccer (1 team): United Turlock Express

2012 U.S. OPEN CUP FACTS:

  • Largest field of teams (64) in tournament proper in competition’s modern era (1995 to present), eclipsing previous record of 42 (2005, 2006)
  • Largest expansion of teams (24) from previous a year in competition’s modern era
  • First time in modern era where all U.S.-based Division I, II and III professional clubs participated in tournament proper
  • Home teams through quarterfinal round determined by random selection (change from sealed bid process)
  • Largest field of professional teams (32) in tournament proper in competition’s modern era, eclipsing previous record of 28 (2000, 2001)
  • Largest field of amateur teams (32) in tournament proper in competition’s modern era, eclipsing previous record of 21 (2011)

ABOUT THE LAMAR HUNT U.S. OPEN CUP:
Dating back to 1914, the U.S. Open Cup is the oldest cup competition in United States soccer and is among the oldest in the world. Open to all affiliated amateur and professional teams in the United States, the annual U.S. Open Cup is a 98-year-old single-elimination tournament.

The U.S. Open Cup is very similar to domestic cup competitions popular throughout Europe, South America and the rest of the world. Cup competitions, which usually run concurrent with a country’s league season, are open in the early stages to any club that can qualify, giving local amateur teams a chance to compete against the best teams a country has to offer.

In 1999, the U.S. Open Cup was renamed the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup to honor the long-time soccer supporter and pioneer. Hunt, who died in 2006, was one of the sport’s first major ownership figures and is a member of the National Soccer Hall of Fame. His family continues to operate FC Dallas and the Columbus Crew in Major League Soccer.

The winning team of the U.S. Open Cup has their name engraved on the Dewar Challenge Trophy, which has been permanently retired and remains at U.S. Soccer House in Chicago.

HISTORY OF DEWAR CHALLENGE TROPHY:
The oldest trophy in United States team sports history, the Dewar Challenge Trophy was donated to the American Amateur Football Association in 1912 by Sir Thomas R. Dewar, a British distiller, sportsman and philanthropist during an AAFA (now United States Amateur Soccer Association) visit to London before the 1912 Olympics. The trophy originally was purchased for $500 and given in the hope of promoting soccer in the United States and in the name of Anglo-American friendship.

The cup was first awarded to the Yonkers Football Club (N.Y.) in 1912 after it defeated the Hollywood Inn Football Club (N.Y.) at the Lennox Oval in New York City. The trophy was officially adopted as the U.S. Open Cup trophy before the Brooklyn Field Club’s inaugural championship in 1914 in Pawtucket, R.I. The trophy was retired in 1979, but was refurbished by the USASA in 1997 and was presented to the 1997 and 1998 Open Cup winners, before returning to the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta, N.Y., in 1999.

Starting in 2011, the trophy resides in the main trophy room at U.S. Soccer House in Chicago. When logistics permit, the still fragile trophy can be taken to the site of the cup final to display before the event for fans, and also for the winning team to rise for a night.

HISTORY OF LAMAR HUNT U.S. OPEN CUP:
As the oldest annual team tournament in U.S. sports history, the U.S. Open Cup dates back to 1914 when the Brooklyn Field Club of the North American Foot Ball League (NAFBL) won the first national title by defeating the Brooklyn Celtics in Pawtucket, R.I. First instituted as the National Challenge Cup under the aegis of the United States Football Association (now U.S. Soccer), it was conceived as a competition open to all players (amateur and professional) and based upon England’s Football Association Cup format.

During the Open Cup’s early years, teams sponsored by industry in the East’s urban centers dominated the competition. Bethlehem Steel of Pennsylvania (NAFBL) won four Open Cup titles between 1915 and 1919. Bethlehem Steel would make it five overall titles in 1926, while the American Soccer League’s Fall River Marksmen (Mass.) won four national crowns between 1924 and 1931. The Marksmen became the New Bedford Whalers in 1932 and captured their fifth Open Cup crown (tying Bethlehem Steel) that same year.

The last team to capture five tournament titles was Los Angeles Maccabee SC (1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1981). Although there have been numerous back-to-back winners (eight overall by seven different teams), only the New York Greek-Americans, the Fall River Marksmen/New Bedford Whalers, St. Louis Stix, Baer and Fuller/St. Louis Central Breweries FC, and the Seattle Sounders of Major League Soccer have won three consecutive crowns. The Marksmen/New Bedford Whalers did it first from 1930-1932, while St. Louis Stix, Baer and Fuller/St. Louis Central Breweries FC followed them up with a treble of their own from 1933-1935. The Greek-Americans won three straight from 1967-1969 and Seattle Sounders FC became the fourth team when it lifted the trophy in 2011 after its 2010 and 2009 triumphs.

While teams sponsored by industries in the East’s urban centers dominated the Men’s Open and Amateur Cups until the 1950s, the teams from the West and Midwest have flexed their muscles in the later years. California alone has garnered the lion’s share of success, winning 12 titles since 1973. Missouri, Illinois and Florida have also appeared regularly on the winner’s list.

Although it is now a complete “knock-out” tournament, with a few exceptions the U.S. Open Cup final was a two-leg, home-and-away series between 1928 and 1968.

Despite the prominence of the North American Soccer League from 1967 to 1984, NASL teams rarely showed the inclination to enter the U.S. Open Cup competition. Until the emergence of Major

League Soccer, full professional teams were almost nonexistent in the competition. That has changed in the past two decades, though, with MLS taking part since 1996, thus helping to make the tournament a true “national” championship.

U.S. OPEN CUP CHAMPIONSHIP RESULTS (1914-present)

  • 1914: Brooklyn Field Club 2, Brooklyn Celtic 1 (May 16, Coates Field; Pawtucket, R.I.)
  • 1915: Bethlehem Steel of Pa. 3, Brooklyn Celtic 1 (May 1; Taylor Field; Bethlehem, Pa.)
  • 1916: Bethlehem Steel of Pa. 1, Fall River Rovers 0 (May 16; Coates Field; Pawtucket, R.I.)
  • 1917: Fall River Rovers of Mass. 1, Bethlehem Steel of Pa. 0 (May 5, Coates Field; Pawtucket, R.I.)
  • 1918: Bethlehem Steel of Pa. 3, Fall River Rovers 0 – replay (May 19; Harrison, N.J.)
  • 1919: Bethlehem Steel of Pa. 2, Paterson FC (April 19; Athletic Field; Fall River, Mass.)
  • 1920: St. Louis Ben Miller FC 2, Fore River Rovers 1 (May 8; Handlan’s Park; St. Louis, Mo.)
  • 1921: Brooklyn Robbins Dry Dock 4, Scullin Steel 2 (April 19; Fall River Athletic Field; Fall River, Mass.)
  • 1922: St. Louis Scullin Steel 3, Todd Shipyards 2 (March 19; High School Field; St. Louis, Mo.)
  • 1923: Paterson FC of N.J. title v. Scullin Steel, which could not field team for replay (injuries; baseball)
  • 1924: Fall River Marksmen of Mass. 4, Vesper Buick 2 (March 30; High School Field; St. Louis, Mo.)
  • 1925: Shawsheen FC of Andover, Mass. 3, Canadian Club 0 (April 19; Mark’s Stadium; Tiverton, R.I.)
  • 1926: Bethlehem Steel of Pa. 7, Ben Miller SC (April 11; Ebbets Field; Brooklyn, N.Y.)
  • 1927: Fall River Marksmen of Mass. 7, Holley Carburetor (May 1; Univ. of Detroit Stadium; Detroit)
  • 1928: New York Nationals 4, Bricklayers 1 – aggregate score (April 9 in New York; April 15 in Chicago)
  • 1929: New York Hakoah SC 5, Madison Kennels 0 – aggregate (March 31 in St. Louis; April 7 in Brooklyn)
  • 1930: Fall River Marksmen of Mass. 9, Bruell Insurance 3 – agg. (3/30 in New York; 4/6 in Cleveland)
  • 1931: Fall River Marksmen of Mass. 9, Bricklayer FC 3 – agg. (4/5 in New York; 4/12 and 4/19 in Chicago)
  • 1932: New Bedford Whalers of Mass. 8, Stix, Baer & Fuller 5 – agg. (3/26 and 4/2; Sportsman’s Park; St.L)
  • 1933: St.L Stix, Baer & Fuller 3, N.Y. Americans 1 – aggregate (April 16 in St. Louis; April 23 in Bronx, N.Y.)
  • 1934: St.L Stix, Baer & Fuller 11, Pawtucket Rangers 5 – agg. (4/1 in St.L; 4/8 in Pawtucket; 4/16 in St.L)
  • 1935: St.L Central Breweries 7, Pawtucket Rangers 5 – agg. (4/28 in St.L; 5/6 in Paw.; 5/12 in Newark)
  • 1936: Phila. German-American SC 5, Shamrocks SC 2 – aggregate (April 26 in St. Louis; May 3 in Phila.)
  • 1937: New York Americans 4, Shamrocks SC 3 – aggregate (April 11 in St. Louis; April 18 in Bronx, N.Y.)
  • 1938: Chicago Sparta ABA 6, St. Mary’s Celtic 2 – aggregate (April 17 in Chicago; April 24 in Bronx, N.Y.)
  • 1939: Brooklyn St. Mary’s Celtic 5, Manhattan Beer 2 – agg. (April 30 in Chicago; May 7 in Bronx, N.Y.)
  • 1940: Baltimore SC and Chicago Sparta named co-champs (2-2 in aggregate; 3rd game not agreed upon)
  • 1941: Pawtucket Rangers of R.I. 8, Chrysler FC 5 – agg. (May 4 in Pawtucket, R.I.; May 11 in Detroit)
  • 1942: Gallatin SC 6, Pawtucket Rangers 3 – aggregate (May 17 in Dora, Pa.; May 31 in Pawtucket, R.I.)
  • 1943: Brooklyn Hispano 5, Morgan Strasser 4 – aggregate (May 24 and 30; Starlight Park; Bronx, N.Y.)
  • 1944: Brooklyn Hispano 4, Morgan Strasser 0 (May 14; The Polo Grounds, New York, N.Y.)
  • 1945: N.Y. Brookhattan 6, Cleveland Americans 2 – agg. (June 10 in Bronx, N.Y.; Jun 16 in Cleveland)
  • 1946: Chicago Vikings 3, Fall River Ponta Delgada 2 – agg. (July 7 in Tiverton, R.I.; July 14 in Chicago, Ill.)
  • 1947: Fall River Ponta Delgada SC 9, Sparta 3 – agg. (Aug. 31 in Fall River, Mass.; Sept. 7 in Chicago, Ill.)
  • 1948: St. Louis Simpkins-Ford 3, Brookhattan-Galicia 2 (Oct. 17; Sportsman’s Park; St. Louis, Mo.)
  • 1949: Pittsburgh Morgan SC 4, Philadelphia Nationals 3 – aggregate (May 15 in Phila.; May 29 in Pitt.)
  • 1950: St. Louis Simpkins-Ford 3, Ponta Delgada 1 – agg. (April 22 in St. Louis; May 7 in Tiverton, R.I.)
  • 1951: N.Y. German Hungarian SC 8, Heidelberg SC 6 – agg. (June 10 in Pitt.; June 17 in Queens, N.Y.)
  • 1952: Pittsburgh Harmarville SC 7, Phila. Nationals 5 – aggregate (June 1 in Harmarville; June 8 in Phila.)
  • 1953: Chicago Falcons 3, Pittsburgh Harmarville – agg. (April 19 in Harmarville, Pa.; April 26 in Chicago)
  • 1954: New York Americans 3, St. Louis Kutis SC 1 – aggregate (April 18 in St. Louis; May 16 in N.Y.)
  • 1955: SC Eintracht of N.Y. 2, Danish American SC 0 (April 24; Rancho La Cienega Stadium; Los Angeles)
  • 1956: Pittsburgh Harmarville SC 3, Schwaben SC of Ill. 2 – aggregate (July 21 in Chicago; July 28 in Pa.)
  • 1957: St. Louis Kutis SC 6, New York Hakoah 1 – aggregate (March 31 in St. Louis; April 14 in Bronx, N.Y.)
  • 1958: Los Angeles Kickers 2, Baltimore Pompei SC 1 (July 21; Baltimore, Md.)
  • 1959: San Pedro McIlvaine Canvasbacks of Calif. 4, Fall River 3 (June 8; Rancho La Cienega Stadium; L.A.)
  • 1960: Philadelphia Ukrainian Nationals 5, Los Angeles Kickers 3 (May 29; Edison Field; Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • 1961: Philadelphia Ukrainian Nationals 7, United Scots 4 – aggregate (June 11 in L.A.; June 25 in Phila.)
  • 1962: New York Hungaria 3, San Francisco Scots 2 (June 17; Eintracht Oval; New York, N.Y.)
  • 1963: Philadelphia Ukrainian Nationals 1, Armenian SC 0 (June 2; Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • 1964: Los Angeles Kickers 4, Ukrainian Nationals 2 – aggregate (June 1 in Phila.; June 21 in L.A.)
  • 1965: New York Ukrainians 5, Hansa of Ill. 2 – aggregate score (June 27 in N.Y.; July 7 in Chicago)
  • 1966: Phila. Ukrainian Nationals 4, Orange County SC 0 – aggregate (May 22 in L.A.; June 5 in Phila.)
  • 1967: New York Greek-American 4, Orange County SC 2 (July 23; Eintracht Oval; New York, N.Y.)
  • 1968: New York Greek-American 2, Olympic SC of Ill. 1 – aggregate (July 21 in Chicago; July 28 in N.Y.)
  • 1969: New York Greek-American 1, Montebello Armenians 0 (June 29; Los Angeles, Calif.)
  • 1970: SC Elizabeth of N.J. 2, Los Angeles Croatia 1 (May 3; New York)
  • 1971: New York Hota SC 6, San Pedro Yugoslavs 4 (May 16; Rancho Cienega Stadium; Los Angeles, Calif.)
  • 1972: SC Elizabeth of N.J. 1, San Pedro Yugoslavs 0 (May 21; Union, N.J.)
  • 1973: Los Angeles Maccabee SC 5, Cle. Inter-Italian 3 (June 10; Rancho Cienega Stadium; Los Angeles)
  • 1974: New York Greek-American 2, Chicago Croatian SC 0 (June 2; New York)
  • 1975: Los Angeles Maccabee SC 1, N.Y. Inter-Giuliana 0 (June 15; El Camino College; Torrance, Calif.)
  • 1976: San Francisco AC 1, N.Y. Inter-Giuliana 0 (May 23)
  • 1977: Los Angeles Maccabee SC 5, United German Hungarians 1 (June 19)
  • 1978: Los Angeles Maccabee SC 2, Vasco Da Gama 0 (July 30)
  • 1979: Brooklyn Dodgers SC 2, Chicago Croatian SC 1 (June 17)
  • 1980: New York Pancyprian-Freedoms 3, Maccabee AC 2 (June 15)
  • 1981: Los Angeles Maccabee SC 5, Brooklyn Dodgers SC 1 (June 28)
  • 1982: New York Pancyprian-Freedoms 4, Maccabee AC 3 (June 6)
  • 1983: New York Pancyprian-Freedoms 4, St. Louis Kutis SC 3 (July 3)
  • 1984: New York A.O. Krete 4, San Pedro Yugoslavs 2 (June 24; St. Louis Soccer Park; Fenton, Mo.)
  • 1985: San Francisco Greek-American AC 2, St. Louis Kutis 1 (June 30)
  • 1986: St. Louis Kutis SC 1, San Pedro Yugoslavs 0 (July 13; Long Beach, Calif.)
  • 1987: Club España of Wash. D.C. 3-2 in penalties; 0-0 in reg. (June 21; St. Louis Soccer Park; Fenton, Mo.)
  • 1988: St. Louis Busch SC 2, Greek American AC 1 (June 25; St. Louis Soccer Park; Fenton, Mo.)
  • 1989: St. Petersburg Kickers of Fla. 2, N.Y. Greek AA 1 (July 8; St. Louis Soccer Park; Fenton, Mo.)
  • 1990: Chicago A.A.C. Eagles 2, Brooklyn Italians 1 (July 28; Kuntz Stadium; Indianapolis, Ind.)
  • 1991: Brooklyn Italians SC 1, Richardson Rockets 0 (Aug. 10; Brooklyn College; Brooklyn, N.Y.)
  • 1992: San Jose Oaks of Calif. 2, Bridgeport Vasco da Gama 1 (July 11; Kuntz Stadium; Indianapolis, Ind.)
  • 1993: San Fran. C.D. Mexico 5, United German-Hungarians 0 (July 17; Kuntz Stadium; Indianapolis, Ind.)
  • 1994: San Francisco Greek-American AC 3, Bavarian Leinenkugel 0 (July 30; UGH Field; Oakford, Pa.)
  • 1995: Richmond Kickers 4-2 in penalties v. El Paso Patriots; 1-1 in reg. (Aug. 27; El Paso, Texas)
  • 1996: D.C. United 3, Rochester Raging Rhinos 0 (Oct. 30; RFK Stadium; Washington, D.C.)
  • 1997: Dallas Burn 5-3 in penalties v. D.C. United; 0-0 in reg. (Oct. 29; Carroll Stadium; Indianapolis, Ind.)
  • 1998: Chicago Fire 2, Columbus Crew 1 (Oct. 30; Soldier Field; Chicago, Ill.)
  • 1999: Rochester Raging Rhinos 2, Colorado Rapids 0 (Sept. 13; Crew Stadium; Columbus, Ohio)
  • 2000: Chicago Fire 2, Miami Fusion 1 (Oct. 21; Soldier Field; Chicago, Ill.)
  • 2001: LA Galaxy 2, New England Revolution 1 (Oct. 27; Titan Stadium; Fullerton, Calif.)
  • 2002: Columbus Crew 1, LA Galaxy 0 (Oct. 24; Crew Stadium; Columbus, Ohio)
  • 2003: Chicago Fire 1, N.Y./N.J. MetroStars 0 (Oct. 15; Giants Stadium; East Rutherford, N.J.)
  • 2004: Kansas City Wizards 1, Chicago Fire 0 (Sept. 22; Arrowhead Stadium; Kansas City, Mo.)
  • 2005: LA Galaxy 1, FC Dallas 0 (Sept. 28; The Home Depot Center; Carson, Calif.)
  • 2006: Chicago Fire 3, LA Galaxy 1 (Sept. 27; Toyota Park; Bridgeview, Ill.)
  • 2007: New England Revolution 3, FC Dallas 2 (Oct. 3; Pizza Hut Park; Frisco, Texas)
  • 2008: D.C. United 2, Charleston Battery 1 (Sept. 3; RFK Stadium; Washington, D.C.)
  • 2009: Seattle Sounders FC 2, D.C. United 1 (Sept. 2; RFK Stadium; Washington, D.C.)
  • 2010: Seattle Sounders FC 2, Columbus Crew 1 (Oct. 5; Qwest Field; Seattle, Wash.)
  • 2011: Seattle Sounders FC 2, Chicago Fire 0 (Oct. 4; CenturyLink Field; Seattle, Wash.)


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