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U-17 WNT Heads to U.S. Soccer NTC as World Cup Qualifying Prep Continues

CHICAGO (Oct. 8, 2015) – The U.S. Under-17 Women’s National Team, under head coach B.J. Snow, will hold a training camp from Oct. 11-18 at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson, California. Snow has called up 24 players for the event and will add two more goalkeepers before it begins.

Fifteen of the players called for the camp were born in 1999, which is the age cut-off year for the 2016 U-17 Women’s World Cup. The other nine players were born in 2000. The camp will be held concurrently with an Under-16 Girls’ National Team camp and the teams will scrimmage once during the week.

The U.S. U-17s are still five months away from qualifying for the next Women’s World Cup. The 2016 CONCACAF Under-17 Women’s Championship will be held on the Caribbean island of Grenada next March. The tournament will send three teams to the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup to be played in Jordan in September of 2016. 

The Under-17 Women's Championship will feature eight teams, three from the Caribbean Football Union (CFU), two from the Central American Football Union (UNCAF) and three from North America. 

Canada, Mexico and the United States are automatically qualified from North America, while the qualifying processes in CFU and UNCAF will take place in the coming months. As the host country, Grenada is automatically qualified as one of the three representatives of CFU. 

The eight teams will be drawn into two groups of four teams each and after the group stage, the winner and second-place team from each group will cross-over for the semifinals. The winner of each semifinal match qualifies directly to the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup while the two losing semifinalists will play a third-place match with the winner also advancing to the World Cup. 

U-17 WNT Roster by Position:
GOALKEEPERS (2): Laurel Ivory (Sunrise; Surfside, Fla.), Katie Meyer (Eagles SC; Newbury Park, Calif.)

DEFENDERS (8): Kerry Abello (Team Chicago; Aurora, Ill.), Claire Constant (McLean; Alexandria, Ga.), Naomi Girma (Central Valley Crossfire; San Jose, Calif.), Shae Holmes (Real Colorado; Highlands Ranch, Colo.), Karlie Paschall (Tennessee SC; Brentwood, Tenn.), Karina Rodriguez (SoCal Blues; Torrance, Calif.), Olivia Wade (LaRoca FC; Kaysville, Utah), Sydney Zandi (Penn Fusion; West Chester, Pa.)

MIDFIELDERS (7): Croix Bethune (Concord Fire; Alpharetta, Ga.), Coriana Dyke (Colorado Rush; Littleton, Colo.), Emina Ekic (Javanon; Fairdale, Ky.), Nicolette Hernandez (Eclipse; Naperville, Ill.), Jaelin Howell (Real Colorado; Windsor, Colo.), Alexis Loera (Colorado Storm; Thornton, Colo.), Brianna Martinez (New Mexico Rush; Albuquerque, N.M.)

FORWARDS (7): Kayla Duran (FC Stars of Massachusetts; Woburn, Mass.), Rachel Jones (Tophat SC; Lawrenceville, Ga.), Civana Kuhlmann (Colorado Rush; Littleton, Colo.), Adrienne Richardson (Minnesota Thunder Academy; Oakdale, Minn.), Sophie Smith (Real Colorado; Windsor, Colo.), Francesca Tagliaferri (PDA; Colts Neck, N.J.), Jordan Taylor (Ohio Premier Eagles; Wadsworth, Ohio)

U-16 GNT Heads to U.S. Soccer NTC for Final 2015 Training Camp

CHICAGO (Oct. 8, 2015) – The U.S. Under-16 Girls’ National Team will hold a training camp from Oct. 11-18 at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson California that will feature 24 players and run concurrently with a U-17 Women’s National Team camp.

This will be the fifth and final camp of the year for the U-16 GNT, which features 23 players born in 2000 and one in 2001. The U-16s will scrimmage once against the U-17s during the week.

The U-16 camp will be run by Women’s Development Coach Tricia Taliaferro who is U.S. Soccer’s main scout for the ’00 birth year. All of the players in this camp are age-eligible for the next FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup in 2016, but the main birth year for that tournament is 1999.

This age group is in a two-year cycle that will transition to the U-18 and then the U-20 WNT with the goal of playing in the 2020 FIFA Under-20 Women’s World Cup.

U.S. U-16 GNT Roster by Position:

GOALKEEPERS (3): Katherine Asman (TopHat SC; Roswell, Ga.), Hensley Hancuff (OFC; Edmond, Okla.), Danielle Hansen (Real Colorado; Broomfield, Colo.)

DEFENDERS (7): Maycee Bell (Sporting Blue Valley; Wichita, Kans.), Chai Cortez (Hawaii Surf; Kahului, Hawaii), Madelyn Desiano (SoCal Blues; San Clemente, Calif.), Sarah Piper (Texas Rush; The Woodlands, Texas), Julietta Thron (Albertson Fury; Caldwell, N.J.), Madeline Vergura (FC Stars of Mass.; Concord, Mass.), Kennedy Wesley (SoCal Blues; Rossmoor, Calif.)

MIDFIELDERS (8): Ravin Alexander (Ohio Elite; Fairfield, Ohio), Sierra Enge (Carlsbad Elite; Cardiff, Calif.), Kylie Minamishin (Honolulu Bulls; Mililani, Hawaii), Angela Morales (Legends FC; Montclair, Calif.), Jenna Nighswonger (Slammers FC; Huntington Beach, Calif.), Ashlynn Serepca (Carolina Rapids; Cornelius, N.C.), Kali Trevithick (San Diego Surf; Temecula, Calif.), Summer Yates (Pac NW; Pasco, Wash.)

FORWARDS (6): Sophie Hirst (Crossfire Premier; Seattle, Wash.), Rebecca Jarrett (World Class; Washington Township, N.J.), Gabi Juarez (Slammers FC; Tustin, Calif.), Nohemi Mendoza (Heat FC; Las Vegas, Nev.), Allison Schlegel (Real Colorado; Parker, Colo.), Trinity Watson (San Diego Surf; San Diego, Calif.)

Captain Claudio Recalls the Greatest 'Dos a Cero' of All

The U.S. Men’s National Team rode a shock opening win against fourth-ranked Portugal, a draw against the host Korea Republic and a little help from the goalposts to advance to the Round of 16 at the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Finishing second in the group meant that the MNT would have less than three full days rest to turn around and face regional rivals Mexico in the highest stakes match the two nations had ever played. With little time to prepare, in some respects the U.S. was lucky to have drawn the team with which it was most familiar.

Despite the U.S. having won four of the previous five meetings, according to U.S. captain Claudio Reyna, when the team arrived at Jeonju World Cup Stadium that June afternoon, there wasn’t much respect shown from the opposition side.

“Before the game we walked out and we were walking around the field. We had this focus and concentration as a team as you do preparing for any game,” the former team captain told “I was with Eddie Lewis, Frankie Hejduk, Gregg Berhalter and Earnie Stewart and we were ready to go – we were foaming at the mouth for this game. We looked over and the Mexicans were laughing, joking and looking at us…That was it.”

Reyna called the team over to quickly finish their pre-game pitch inspection and head back into the locker room.

“We sort of wanted the game to start, we were so ready to go,” he continued. “Back in the locker room, I remember saying, ‘These guys are laughing at us. They think they’re going to beat us easily.’”

Mexico had done efficient work to get to that point. Having finished with seven points atop a group that featured Italy, Croatia and Ecuador, El Tri’s run to the Round of 16 had the side brimming with self-assurance ahead of the match.

“They were feeling confident, but the lack of respect they showed was clear – you never do that,” said Reyna. “I would never do that in my career, even if I felt really comfortable about beating an opponent. That you’d be giggling, laughing and joking at the opponent. It was pretty clear that it was directed at us and at some of our players, and obviously we play them all the time so there’s that rivalry.”

“I remember saying, ‘We’re not losing this game guys.’ Everyone went around and you could feel it all the way through that we couldn’t wait to get out there.”

Reyna gets past Ramon Morales in the most famous "Dos a Cero" in Men's National Team history.

Injuries and suspensions limited the U.S. options, and Bruce Arena used the uncertainty to confound the Mexicans by deploying a 3-5-2 formation for the match. The switch saw Reyna move from his regular central midfield position to the right flank, with the move paying off almost immediately. Following an eighth minute foul in the Mexico half, Brian McBride quickly restarted as he saw Reyna pushing up the flank. The U.S. captain beat two defenders to the end line before centering for Josh Wolff, whose deft touch teed up McBride for a clinical finish and an equally gratifying goal celebration.

The goal set an early tone and played perfectly into Arena’s game plan, allowing the U.S. to sit in and pick its moments to counter against an increasingly frustrated Mexican side. Landon Donovan’s second- half header off an Eddie Lewis cross helped ice the game, giving the MNT its first ever World Cup knockout round win and a quarterfinal date with Germany.

“It was just a great team performance. To beat them 2-0, eliminate them and afterwards realize this was a big deal back in the States,” Reyna said.

The win raised the profile of the Men’s National Team more than any other since the 1994 FIFA World Cup, but in an age before social media, Reyna admitted the players didn’t realize how big an impact the victory had made.

“We didn’t know how huge it was at home,” he said. “We were in Korea and we knew it was sort of growing in momentum. I remember seeing some of the news clips from Mexico City where there were people in plazas and squares crying over the result – that felt good.”

U.S. supporters celebrate during the MNT's 2-0 win against Mexico at the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Though the momentum was already building towards U.S. domination of the rivalry, the World Cup win tipped the scales. Since 2000, the MNT has held a 13-5-5 advantage against El Tri.

“From that moment on, it continued to be a real domination of Mexico,” Reyna said. “We went on and beat them all the time. That was the point where we felt we were no longer playing behind them, that we were better than them.”

“It was one big coming out party on the biggest stage.” 

USA Tops Olympic Qualifying Group with 4-0 Win against Panama

COMMERCE CITY, Colo. (Oct. 6, 2015) - The U.S. Under-23 Men's National Team moved on to the semifinal round of the 2015 CONCACAF Men's Olympic Qualifying Tournament as the top seed out of Group A after a 4-0 win against Panama at Dick's Sporting Goods Park.

Panama gamely held the USA scoreless through the first half, but the Yanks' depth told in the second half as Jerome Kiesewetter and Jordan Morris entered at halftime to spur the U.S. attack. An own goal by Panama defender Fidel Escobar in the 50th minute opened the floodgates as Kiesewetter and Morris both bagged a goal a piece in the ensuing six minutes to give the U.S. a quick 3-0 lead before Luis Gil capped the scoring from the penalty spot in the 71st minute. 

The match was also the first of the tournament for goalkeeper Ethan Horvath, who had been with his club Molde FK during the USA's first two games, but entered the lineup seamlessly to deliver the team's first shutout of the competition.  

The USA will face the loser of Group B's Mexico-Honduras clash (if the teams tie, the U.S. will play Honduras) in the first semifinal which kicks off from Rio Tinto Stadium in Sandy, Utah at 1 p.m. MT (3 p.m. ET) on Oct. 10. The second semifinal will follow immediately after from the same stadium and both matches will be broadcast on Telemundo.

Goal Scoring Summary:
USA-Fidel Escobar (own goal) 50th minute: 
Gboly Ariyibi did the work on the left side, cutting past one defender and speeding by another to free himself to send a cross into the box. Ariyibi hit a low hard ball in towards a breaking Jordan Morris; Escobar cut in front and attempted to clear it away, but his clearance ended up in the back of the net.  USA 1, PAN 0 

USA-Jerome Kiesewetter (Luis Gil) 53rd minute: Just three minutes after the first goal, Kiesewetter found the net to double the U.S. lead. A series of passes put the ball at the feet of Luis Gil, who took a turn at the top of the box and threaded a pass to Kiesewetter, who ripped a shot from the right side to bag his third goal of the tournament. USA 2, PAN 0 

USA-Jordan Morris (Jerome Kiesewetter) 56th minute: Again three minutes later and the USA had another goal.  Kiesewetter and Morris, the pair that had already combined for multiple goals in the tournament, were at it again. Kiesewetter drew the defense as he jetted down the right side, which freed Morris centrally. Kiesewetter found him with a pass and Morris converted with a glancing touch for his third goal of the tournament. USA 3, PAN 0 

USA-Luis Gil (penalty kick) 71st minute: Kiesewetter set up the penalty, making a number of nifty moves to get into the box, before being brought down. Luis Gil stepped up to take the penalty, his second of the tournament, and confidently tucked it in. USA 4, PAN 0 (FINAL)

-U.S. Under-23 Men’s National Team Match Report-

Match: U.S. U-23 MNT vs. Panama
Date: Oct. 6, 2015
Competition: 2015 CONCACAF Men’s Olympic Qualifying Championship – Group A
Venue: Dick’s Sporting Goods Park; Commerce City, Colo.
Kickoff: 7:30 p.m. MT
Attendance: 3,313
Weather: 55 degrees; Light rain

Scoring Summary:             1          2          F                                   
USA                                      0          4          4
PAN                                      0          0          0 

USA-Fidel Escobar (own goal)                            50th minute
USA-Jerome Kiesewetter (Jordan Morris)           53
USA-Jordan Morris (Jerome Kiesewetter)           56
USA-Luis Gil (penalty kick)                                71

USA: 12-Ethan Horvath; 2-Boyd Okwuonu, 5-Will Packwood, 4-Cameron Carter-Vickers, 7-Dillon Serna; 13-Matt Polster (8-Emerson Hyndman, 59), 10-Luis Gil (capt.), 16-Gedion Zelalem (9-Jordan Morris, 46); 19-Maki Tall (17-Jerome Kiesewetter, 46), 11-Alonso Hernandez, 20-Gboly Ariyibi
Subs Not Used: 1-Zack Steffen, 3-Matt Miazga, 6-Wil Trapp, 14-Fatai Alashe, 15-Marc Pelosi, 18-Charlie Horton
Head Coach: Andi Herzog

PAN: 1-Elieser Powell; 3-Kevin Galvan, 4-Michael Murillo, 6-Fidel Escobar, 14-Roberto Chen; 5-Pedro Jeanine (capt.), 10-Miguel Camargo (8-Jhamal Rodriguez, 55), 11-Edgar Barcenas, 18-Josiel Nunez (15-Francisco Narbon, 73); 9-Abdiel Arroyo, 19-Jorman Aguilar (16-Justin Simons, 85)
Subs Not Used: 2-Chin Hormechea, 7-Jesus Gonzalez, 12-Jamie de Garcia, 13-Jesus Araya, 20-Orlando Mosquera
Head Coach: Leonardo Pipino

Stats Summary: USA / PAN
Shots: 18 / 13
Shots on Goal: 7 / 4
Saves: 4 / 4
Corner Kicks: 3 / 4        
Offside: 3 / 0
Fouls: 11 / 12

Misconduct Summary:
PAN-Kevin Galvan (caution)         65th minute
PAN-Abdiel Aroyo (caution)          70

Referee: Hugo Cruz (CRC)
1st Referee: Carlos Fernandez (CRC)
2nd Referee: Jairo Morales (PUR)
4th official: Javier Santos (PUR)

Revenge at the Rose Bowl

Site of Saturday’s CONCACAF Cup, The Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Califrnia, has been host to some of American soccer’s biggest triumphs.

It held the U.S. MNT’s first World Cup victory in 44 years – an unforgettable 2-1 win against Colombia in 1994, the WNT’s 1999 World Cup Final win against China and the men’s repatriation of the 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup thanks to a 2-0 win in the final against Costa Rica.

While it’s seen great moments, it also played host to a match most U.S. fans would rather forget. Nine years on from the 2002 win against Costa Rica, the MNT returned to Pasadena to play for the same Gold Cup trophy against heated rivals Mexico.

While the game was in the United States, the vast majority of the 93,420 in attendance were behind El Tri. Despite the disadvantage in support, the U.S. ran out to a dream start as Michael Bradley and Landon Donovan scored to give the team a 2-0 lead inside the first 23 minutes.

Micheal Bradley celebrates with Landon Donovan after the pair had put the MNT up 2-0 in the first half of the 2011 Gold Cup final. 

“We started that game off really well – you couldn’t ask for a better start up 2-0,” remembered MNT midfielder Alejandro Bedoya.

Just as the MNT made it look easy to go up two goals early on, Mexico made coming back to equalize look just as simple as Pablo Barrera and Andres Guardado pulled their side level by the 36thgminute. Locked 2-2 at the break, Mexico fed off the crowd as Barrera put El Tri ahead 3-2 in the 50th minute before Giovanni dos Santos’ 76th minute chip confirmed the result for Mexico.

“We just bottled it,” continued Bedoya. “If we could have that start again, I would take it in a heartbeat. It’s just about finishing the game off.”

No stranger to big matches, MNT captain Michael Bradley said even though four years have passed since the match, the game and El Tri’s celebration afterwards still sticks in his memory.

“Any time you lose a final, you don’t forget that quickly,” Bradley told “I think while it was a great game that day – both teams went at it – in the end, they were able to make a few more plays than we did and when you have to watch your big rival lift a trophy, that stays with you.”

“That was tough,” agreed Bedoya. “It was tough to just be a player and having to wait on the field at The Rose Bowl, standing there and seeing them walking across that stage, celebrating on our home soil… it left us all with a bitter taste in our mouths.”

Alejandro Bedoya challenges Gerardo Torrado in the 2011 CONCACAF Gold Cup final.

While the memory of 2011 still stings, with a ticket to Russia on the line, Bedoya said he’ll use the memory as motivation for Saturday’s CONCACAF Cup.

And with the way the U.S. fan base has grown with groups like the American Outlaws leading the charge, Bedoya expects a different atmosphere Saturday.

“I remember there were a lot of Mexican fans in attendance,” Bedoya said. “In four years, I think a lot has changed in terms of soccer in this country. I don’t think we’ll be seeing those same numbers at The Rose Bowl this year. I think our fans will come out in full support and that’s all we can hope for. The rest just comes down to us playing and doing whatever it takes to win, going all out and knowing that this result means a lot to so many people everywhere.”

The game certainly means a lot to Bradley. In the buildup to the match last week, the U.S. captain chose a message about the Mexico match to debut the public setting on his previously private Instagram account.

With CONCACAF announcing tickets for the match sold out on Monday, fans have certainly recognized the magnitude of the occasion and according to Bradley, outside of the World Cup, there are few international matches that will compare to Saturday’s game.

“Games against Mexico don’t come around every day,” he said of the post. “Games against Mexico that have so much on the line don’t either. You can play friendlies, you can play games where nothing matters, but in a game like this, with the way everything has been built up, it means everything. The atmosphere is going to be amazing. It’s two good teams who want to win, who want to go at each other and I think it’s set up to be a great night.”

Master Over Mexico

As the U.S. Men’s National Team inches towards Saturday’s all-important CONCACAF Cup playoff with Mexico, MNT head coach Jurgen Klinsmann heads into the match having proved to be a difficult nemesis for El Tri.

Whether as a player, coach of the German National Team or his current tenure with the USA, Klinsmann has never lost to Mexico, going 5-0-5 all-time.






German International

1-1 D



German International

0-0 D



German International

2-1 W (goal)

World Cup


German Coach

4-3 W

Confederations Cup



1-1 D




1-0 W




0-0 D

World Cup Qualifying



2-0 W

World Cup Qualifying



2-2 D




2-0 W


As U.S. head coach, Klinsmann’s 3-0-3 record against El Tri is the longest unbeaten run any MNT manager has earned against Mexico, having arrived at that record by getting results at home and on the road.

In 2012, Klinsmann became the first U.S. head coach to earn a victory at the vaunted Estadio Azteca in Mexico City. Less than a year later, he joined Steve Sampson as the only U.S. managers to earn a World Cup Qualifying point on Mexican soil, as the MNT played to a 0-0 draw at the Azteca on March 26, 2013. Following that result in Mexico City, the team embarked on a record 12-match winning streak which extended through the MNT’s fifth CONCACAF Gold Cup title that July. That following September, Klinsmann continued the MNT’s “Dos a Cero” tradition against Mexico in Columbus as the U.S. qualified for its seventh straight FIFA World Cup.

Once there, the U.S. team’s 2-1 victory against Ghana to open last summer’s FIFA World Cup finally avenged the side’s back-to-back knockouts from the previous two World Cup tournaments. Combined with a 2-2 draw against Portugal in the following match, Klinsmann helped guide the U.S. to the tournament’s knockout stage, marking the first time the MNT has advanced from World Cup group play in back-to-back tournaments.

The MNT has achieved other historic results against traditional soccer powers since Klinsmann’s tenure as U.S. manager began in 2011. Over the course of his four years in charge of the MNT, the U.S. has defeated Germany (twice), while also earning its first-ever wins against four-time World Cup champion Italy and then sixth-ranked Netherlands, with three of those four wins coming on the road.

In fact, Klinsmann has the record for most wins by a U.S. coach in Europe with six, adding victories against Slovenia in 2011, Bosnia-Herzegovina in 2013 and the Czech Republic in 2014 to his list of accomplishments as U.S. manager.

With a .653 winning percentage, Klinsmann ranks second all-time among U.S. head coaches to only Bruce Arena, but the difference is marginal, as the former U.S. boss’s all-time mark stands at .658. Now 75 matches into his tenure as MNT head coach, Klinsmann’s percentage sits higher than that of Arena’s at the same point in his tenure (.620).

#RoadToRio Part 2- One Game at a Time

The journey continues for the U-23s.... After defeating Cuba and Canada in its first two matches of the Olympic Qualifying Tournament and clinching a spot in the all-important semifinal match, the U-23 #USMNT heads to Denver for #USAvPAN, looking to secure the top spot in Group A.

Josh Wolff and the Spark that Set the Dos a Cero Fire

When the schedule for the Final Round of CONCACAF qualifying for the 2002 FIFA World Cup came around, the U.S. Soccer Federation had a different idea.

Drawn to play rivals Mexico first, and in February no less, the U.S. Soccer Federation decided to try and maximize home-field by taking advantage of the new phenomenon in the American game – the soccer specific stadium.

Columbus Crew Stadium (now MAPFRE Stadium) was the only one at the time, but with its smaller capacity and location in the heart of the Midwest, the venue proved a perfect spot for the U.S. to have its own unique home atmosphere in response to the heat, altitude and intensity that 100,000 fans at Azteca Stadium in Mexico City could provide. 

“It was a tremendous atmosphere,” remembered U.S. forward Josh Wolff. “It was brutally cold. We had a fantastic crowd and there was a lot to play for. Obviously it’s a qualifier, but it’s even bigger when you’re playing against Mexico. It couldn’t have been any nicer – a chilly night that the Mexican players probably didn’t enjoy, but for us, it was probably a bit of gamesmanship. I think we were excited about the idea of playing in front of our fans on a nice cold night where we could take advantage of it.”

Wolff didn’t start the match that night in late February 2001. When Bruce Arena selected him for the game-day 18, if he was to be used at all, the idea was more likely as a late-game sub.

After 15 minutes, things changed.

With Brian McBride’s right eye looking like he received a haymaker from Mike Tyson more than the clash of heads he took going up for a 50/50 ball, Wolff was called upon as his replacement and got his taste of the chippiness in the match when he was shown a yellow card for a foul on Rafael Carmona in the 40th minute.

He’d been joined on the field just before halftime by an old familiar face in Clint Mathis. Wolff’s former college teammate at the University of South Carolina was tapped to enter the game for Claudio Reyna, who pulled up with a groin injury after stepping to make a seemingly routine pass.

Having burned two subs to replace two of the side’s key players, Wolff and Mathis were certainly the unlikeliest of heroes for the second half, but they proved the odds wrong.

Just after the break, the South Carolina boys, who both hailed from neighboring Georgia, connected on what has become one of the more memorable goals in U.S. World Cup Qualifying history.

“The ball fell to Clint and Mexico was playing a pretty high line,” Wolff recalled. “Obviously I’d played with Clint for a number of years and we had a pretty good understanding of one another. It was just me taking a chance to run the line really well there.”

Mexico’s back line was so high that they were all pinching into the U.S. half of the field when Mathis quickly hit the ball into space for Wolff, who was a step inside the USA half of the midfield stripe.

“Clint hits a great ball over the top,” Wolff continued. “It’s a bit of a foot race with Jorge [Campos] and it was just one of those balls where it’s a 50/50 and I was able to come out with the other side of him. At that point, you just kind of roll it in the open goal and get on with the celebration. The goal was a scramble in the end, but it was a good way to start that game for me and helped fuel us the rest of the match.”

Twenty-One U-20 Players Called for Four Nation’s Tournament in Germany

CHICAGO (Oct. 6, 2015) – Twenty-one players have been called to represent the U.S. Under-20 Men’s National Team at the Four Nation’s Tournament in Germany.

The team will compete against three other nations: Germany on Oct. 6, Scotland on Oct. 9 and Mexico on Oct. 12.

The U-20s were last on the pitch in August, when they travelled to Serbia to compete in the Stevan Vilotic-Cele Tournament; the team finished in fifth place. That served as the first action for the group in this new U-20 cycle. The group started slowly, dropping its first two matches to the host Serbia and France, but concluded with a win against Israel.

Twenty of the players on the roster have ties to the Development Academy. Ten players on the squad play soccer at the collegiate level, while nine players compete for MLS clubs, one player for a Spanish La Liga club, one for an English Premier League Teams, and two for Academy teams. Every player on this roster was born in 1997.

Roster by Position: Detailed Roster
GOALKEEPERS (2): Jonathan Klinsmann (University of California; Newport Beach, Calif.), Mason Stajduhar (Orlando City; Lithia, Fla.)
DEFENDERS (6): Marcello Borges (Michigan; Kearny, N.J), Aaron Herrera (New Mexico; Casa Grande, N.M.), Nick Hinds (Seattle Sounders; Seattle, Wash.), Malcolm Jones (UCLA; Chino Hills, Calif.), Henry Martin (Princeton; New York, N.Y.), James Murphy (Players Development Academy; Scotch Plains, N.J.)
MIDFIELDERS (8): Mukwelle Akale (Villarreal F.C.; Minneapolis, Minn.), Cameron Lindley (Chicago Fire; Carmel, Ind.), Amirgy Pineda (LA Galaxy; Santa Ana, Calif.), Kyle Scott (Chelsea FC; Bristol, England), Evan Waldrep (Creighton; Peoria, Ariz.), Eryk Williamson (Maryland; Alexandria, Va.), Sean Wilson (North Carolina; West Chester, Penn.), Jackson Yueill (UCLA; Bloomington, Minn.)
FORWARDS (5): Coy Craft (FC Dallas; Frisco, Texas), Sebastian Elney (Maryland; Boca Raton, Fla.), Collin Fernandez (Chicago Fire; Downers Grove, Ill.), Victor Mansaray (Seattle Sounders; Des Moines, Wash.), Emmanuel Sabbi (Chicago Magic; Libertyville, Ill.)

Goal Scoring Form: Altidore, Williams and Wondo on Target for Their Clubs Ahead of Mexico Clash

Three players called into this week’s U.S. MNT camp have arrived with goals to their name after weekend play with their respective club teams.

Reading FC midfielder Danny Williams had the quickest output, heading home a cross from teammate Hal Robson-Kanu 15 seconds into his side’s 2-0 victory against Middlesbrough. The goal was the third fastest in Reading’s 144 year history and Williams’ second of the English Championship campaign where Reading currently sit third (5-2-3; 18 points).

Toronto FC forward Jozy Altidore tallied what would be the Reds winning goal in a 3-1 home victory against the Philadelphia Union on Saturday afternoon at BMO Field.

With Sebastian Giovinco opening the scoring in the 28th minute, Altidore increased the lead in the 63rd when he beat Union defender Ray Gaddis to a cross from Marky Delgado, making for an easy finish past Andre Blake. The strike was Altidore’s 12th of the season for Toronto FC and second in as many matches.

Philadelphia’s Steven Vitoria pulled one back three minutes later, but the Union’s Richard Marquez netted an own goal in second half stoppage time to give Toronto a 3-1 win.

Finally, Chris Wondolowski continued his strong league goal scoring form as the San Jose Earthquakes earned a 1-1 draw away to Vancouver Whitecaps FC Saturday night at BC Place.

Trailing 1-0 after the Whitecaps Cristian Techera tallied in the 39th minute, San Jose found the equalizer in the 62nd minute. Earthquakes midfielder Cordell Cato fired a whipping shot that Whitecaps ‘keeper David Ousted spilled, only to see Wondolowski opportunistically put home the rebound to give San Jose an important road point.

The goal was Wondolowski’s 16th of the season and seventh in his last nine matches for San Jose. It also pushed the two-time MLS Golden Boot winner past former U.S. international and current NYCFC head coach Jason Kreis and into fifth all-time on the MLS goal scoring list with 109 career tallies.


Date Matchup Result Venue Attendance Goal Scorers
May 28, 2011 U-18 MNT vs Finland Under-18 Men 0-0 D Lisbon, Portugal 0 --
May 26, 2011 U-18 MNT vs Portugal 0-1 L Lisbon, Portugal 0 --
May 25, 2011 U-18 MNT vs Netherlands 1-1 D Lisbon, Portugal 0 Pineda