U.S. Soccer
0

U.S. MNT Falls on Dramatic Late Goal to Mexico in 2015 CONCACAF Cup

PASADENA, Calif. (Oct. 10, 2015) – The U.S. Men’s National Team fell to Mexico 3-2 after extra time in an intense 120 minutes of action in the 2015 CONCACAF Cup. The match was played in front of a sold-out stadium of 93,723 fans at the Rose Bowl, which was the second largest crowd ever to attend an MNT game. With the victory, Mexico qualifies for the 2017 Confederations Cup in Russia.

The U.S. twice came from behind to equalize at 2-2 in the 108th minute, which appeared to be enough to send the game to penalty kicks, but Paul Aguilar’s spectacular volleyed in the 118th proved to be the game-winner. 

Mexico got on the board early with Javier Hernandez finishing an Oribe Peralta cross in the 10th minute. It took only five minutes for the U.S. to respond with Geoff Cameron heading home a Michael Bradley free kick to level the game at 1-1. That score line would hold for the rest of regulation.

In extra time, Mexico was again the first to find the net with Peralta scoring in the 96th minute, but again the U.S. rallied and Bobby Wood scored to tie the game before Auguilar’s dagger.

The U.S. will next travel to New Jersey for a friendly against Costa Rica on Tuesday, Oct. 13, which will serve as preparation for November’s World Cup Qualifying matches against St. Vincent & The Grenadines and Trinidad & Tobago. 

Goal Scoring Rundown:
MEX– Javier Hernandez (Oribe Peralta), 10th minute: Mexico threaded a ball up the middle into its attacking third and Oribe Peralta dummied the ball which ran to Raul Jimenez, who back-heeled it to Peralta who had continued his run. Peralta found himself facing U.S. goalkeeper Brad Guzan as he drove toward the near post, but as Guzan cut down the angle, Peralta pushed the ball across to Hernandez, who tapped it into the open net to put Mexico ahead early. USA 0, MEX 1 (SEE GOAL) 

USA – Geoff Cameron (Michael Bradley) 15th minute: DaMarcus Beasley jetted down the left side and was chopped down for a free kick near the sideline. Bradley took the kick and swung it into the penalty area. Cameron beat his defender to the ball and headed a hard shot into the net to level the score.  USA 1, MEX 1 (SEE GOAL)

MEX– Oribe Peralta (Paul Aguilar) 96th minute: Mexico caught the U.S. with a long lofted ball over the top on the right side that found Aguilar in the box. As Jermaine Jones and DaMarcus Beasley closed in, Aguilar lunged to push a cross back to the middle that Peralta ran onto and finished drove through the legs of the sliding Geoff Cameron and past Brad Guzan to put El Tri ahead. USA 1, MEX 2 (SEE GOAL) 

USA– Bobby Wood (DeAndre Yedlin) 108th minute: Two substitutes combined for the goal as Yedlin slipped a lovely ball behind the defender to Wood inside the penalty area. Wood timed his run perfectly to beat the back line and then struck his shot first-time through the legs of the Mexican goalkeeper to tie the game. USA 2, MEX 2 (SEE GOAL) 

MEX– Paul Aguilar (Raul Jimenez) 118th minute: With his back to the goal just above the right side of the U.S. penalty box, Jimenez kicked a loose ball high air and it fell right to the crashing Aguilar who smashed an incredible full volley left side of net to give Mexico the win the closing moments of the game. USA 2, MEX 3 FINAL (SEE GOAL)

Key Saves and Defensive Stops:
MEX- Moises Munoz, 44th minute: The U.S. earned a free kick just outside on the penalty box near the left corner. Michael Bradley elected to go at goal, and curled a shot around the two-man wall that was headed for the lower left corner at the near post. Munoz hustled across the line and reached the shot on a dive to keep the score level. 

Coming up Next: #USAvCRC
Location: Red Bull Arena – Harrison, N.J.
Date: October 13, 2015
Opponent: Costa Rica 

Milestone Watch:

  • Geoff Cameron’s goal was the second of his career. Cameron last scored for the USA in a 2013 friendly against Belgium. Both of his goals for the MNT have come from headers.
  • Bobby Wood’s goal was the third of his career and his third of the year. Wood has been a clutch scorer and the goal was his third to come after the 80th minute. Wood scored late winners against Germany and Netherlands in June. 

Additional Notes:

  • The last time the USA and Mexico went to extra time was in the 1999 Confederations Cup semifinal. This was just the third time the two teams have played into extra time.
  • The loss was the first for the U.S. against Mexico in the last seven matchups (3-1-3).
  • DaMarcus Beasley made his 11th career appearance against Mexico tonight.
  • Brad Guzan made the start at goalkeeper. It was his second career start against Mexico.
  • The U.S. is 13-6-5 against Mexico since 2000.
  • The loss was the first for Jurgen Klinsmann against Mexico in 12 matches as a player and coach. (5-1-5)
  • DeAndre Yedlin’s assist was his fourth of the year. 

- U.S. Men’s National Team Match Report - 

Match: U.S. Men’s National Team vs. Mexico
Date: Oct. 10, 2015
Competition: 2015 CONCACAF Cup
Venue: Rose Bowl Stadium; Pasadena, Calif.
Kickoff: 6:30 p.m. PT
Attendance: 93,723
Weather: 91 degrees; Partly cloudy 

Scoring Summary:             1          2          1ET    2ET    F
USA                                     1          0          0          1          2
MEX                                    1          0          1          1          3 

MEX – Javier Hernández (Oribe Peralta)            10th minute
USA – Geoff Cameron (Michael Bradley)           15
MEX – Oribe Peralta (Paul Aguilar)                    96
USA – Bobby Wood (DeAndre Yedlin)              108
MEX – Paul Aguilar (Raul Jimenez)                   118 

Lineups:
USA: 1-Brad Guzan; 23-Fabian Johnson (3-Brad Evans,111), 20-Geoff Cameron, 5-Matt Besler, 7-DaMarcus Beasley; 15-Kyler Beckerman, 13-Jermaine Jones, 4-Michael Bradley (capt.), 9- Gyasi Zardes (2-DeAndre Yedlin, 78); 8-Clint Dempsey, 17-Jozy Altidore (11-Bobby Wood, 98)
Subs Not Used: 6-Tim Ream, 10-Danny Williams, 12-Tim Howard, 14-Ventura Alvarado, 16-Michael Orozco, 18-Chris Wondolowski, 19-Graham Zusi, 21-Jonathan Spector , 22-Nick Rimando
Head Coach: Jurgen Klinsmann

MEX: 12-Moises Muñoz; 22-Paul Aguilar, 15-Hector Moreno, 5-Diego Reyes, 7-Miguel Layun; 18-Andres Guardado (17-Javier Guemez, 80), 4-Rafa Marquez (capt.) (3-Arturo Rivas, 76) 16-Hector Herrera; 9-Raul Jimenez, 14-Javier Hernandez (10-Jesus Corona, 97), 19-Oribe Peralta
Subs Not Used: 1-Alfredo Talavera, 2-Israel Jimenez, 6-Jorge Torres Nilo, 8-Jonathan Dos Santos, 11-Carlos Vela, 20-Javier Aquino, 21-Carlos Esquivel, 23-Elias Hernandez
Head Coach: Ricardo Ferretti

Statistical Summary: USA / MEX
Shots: 13 / 20
Shots on Goal: 5 / 10
Saves: 7 / 3
Corner Kicks: 1 / 6
Fouls: 14 / 17
Offside: 2 / 4 

Misconduct Summary:
MEX – Paul Aguilar (caution)                         21st minute
MEX – Oribe Peralta (caution)                       35
MEX – Hector Moreno (caution)                    43
USA – Kyle Beckerman (caution)                  52
USA – Michael Bradley (caution)                   87
MEX – Javier Guemez (caution)                    95 

Officials:
Referee: Joel Aguilar (SLV)
Assistant Referee 1: Juan Zumba (SLV)
Assistant Referee 2: Leonel Leal (CRC)
Fourth Official: Marlin Mejia (SLV) 

Budweiser Man of the Match: TBD

Read more
MNT Oct 10, 2015

- U.S. Men’s National Team Match Report - 

Match: U.S. Men’s National Team vs. Mexico
Date: Oct. 10, 2015
Competition: 2015 CONCACAF Cup
Venue: Rose Bowl Stadium; Pasadena, Calif.
Kickoff: 6:30 p.m. PT
Attendance: 93,723
Weather: 91 degrees; Partly cloudy 

Scoring Summary:                1          2          1ET     2ET     F
USA                                        1          0          0          1          2
MEX                                       1          0          1          1          3 

MEX – Javier Hernández (Oribe Peralta)       10th minute
USA – Geoff Cameron (Michael Bradley)     15
MEX – Oribe Peralta (Paul Aguilar)               96
USA – Bobby Wood (DeAndre Yedlin)        108
MEX – Paul Aguilar (Raul Jimenez)              118 

Lineups:
USA: 1-Brad Guzan; 23-Fabian Johnson (3-Brad Evans,111), 20-Geoff Cameron, 5-Matt Besler, 7-DaMarcus Beasley; 15-Kyler Beckerman, 13-Jermaine Jones, 4-Michael Bradley (capt.), 9- Gyasi Zardes (2-DeAndre Yedlin, 78); 8-Clint Dempsey, 17-Jozy Altidore (11-Bobby Wood, 98)
Subs Not Used: 6-Tim Ream, 10-Danny Williams, 12-Tim Howard, 14-Ventura Alvarado, 16-Michael Orozco, 18-Chris Wondolowski, 19-Graham Zusi, 21-Jonathan Spector , 22-Nick Rimando
Head Coach: Jurgen Klinsmann

MEX: 12-Moises Muñoz; 22-Paul Aguilar, 15-Hector Moreno, 5-Diego Reyes, 7-Miguel Layun; 18-Andres Guardado (17-Javier Guemez, 80), 4-Rafa Marquez (capt.) (3-Arturo Rivas, 76) 16-Hector Herrera; 9-Raul Jimenez, 14-Javier Hernandez (10-Jesus Corona, 97), 19-Oribe Peralta
Subs Not Used: 1-Alfredo Talavera, 2-Israel Jimenez, 6-Jorge Torres Nilo, 8-Jonathan Dos Santos, 11-Carlos Vela, 20-Javier Aquino, 21-Carlos Esquivel, 23-Elias Hernandez
Head Coach: Ricardo Ferretti

Statistical Summary: USA / MEX
Shots: 13 / 20
Shots on Goal: 5 / 10
Saves: 7 / 3
Corner Kicks: 1 / 6
Fouls: 14 / 17
Offside: 2 / 4

Misconduct Summary:
MEX – Paul Aguilar (caution)                          21st minute
MEX – Oribe Peralta (caution)                         35
MEX – Hector Moreno (caution)                     43
USA – Kyle Beckerman (caution)                   52
USA – Michael Bradley (caution)                    87
MEX – Javier Guemez (caution)                      95 

Officials:
Referee: Joel Aguilar (SLV)
Assistant Referee 1: Juan Zumba (SLV)
Assistant Referee 2: Leonel Leal (CRC)
Fourth Official: Marlin Mejia (SLV) 

Budweiser Man of the Match: TBD

{072155AF-BCCD-4193-8B82-CE4F4AD85948}

Agent of History: Michael Orozco and the MNT's First Win in Mexico

Originally published on October 9, 2015

Leading up to the U.S. friendly against Mexico at Estadio Azteca on Aug. 15, 2012, Michael Orozco told himself he wanted to make history.

“If I get five minutes or 90, I was going to give it my all,” he told ussoccer.com.

Orozco would get around 13 minutes, entering the match with the score locked 0-0 and around the time ESPN commentator Ian Darke mentioned that the U.S. would be pleased to get a draw out of the friendly fixture.


Stormy skies gather over Estadio Azteca ahead of the USMNT's first win on Mexican soil.

A result wouldn’t have been bad. It was something that had only occurred once before for the MNT, coming in a 0-0 draw during 1997 World Cup Qualifying.

Shortly after Darke’s declaration, Brek Shea nutmegged a Mexico defender, got to the end line and centered for Terrence Boyd. A clever back heel from the U.S. forward put the ball on the doorstep for Orozco, who sneaked in to poke home some U.S. history.

The U.S. would play out the final 10 minutes and stoppage time to earn the 1-0 win, its first victory on Mexican soil in 25 tries (11 of which came at the vaunted Estadio Azteca).

Read more
MNT May 24, 2017

Captain Claudio Recalls the Greatest 'Dos a Cero' of All

Originally published on October 7, 2015.

The U.S. Men’s National Team rode a shock opening win against fourth-ranked Portugal, a draw against the host Korea Republic and a little help from the goalposts to advance to the Round of 16 at the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Finishing second in the group meant that the MNT would have less than three full days rest to turn around and face regional rivals Mexico in the highest stakes match the two nations had ever played. With little time to prepare, in some respects the U.S. was lucky to have drawn the team with which it was most familiar.

Despite the U.S. having won four of the previous five meetings, according to U.S. captain Claudio Reyna, when the team arrived at Jeonju World Cup Stadium that June afternoon, there wasn’t much respect shown from the opposition side.

“Before the game we walked out and we were walking around the field. We had this focus and concentration as a team as you do preparing for any game,” the former team captain told ussoccer.com. “I was with Eddie Lewis, Frankie Hejduk, Gregg Berhalter and Earnie Stewart and we were ready to go – we were foaming at the mouth for this game. We looked over and the Mexicans were laughing, joking and looking at us…That was it.”

Reyna called the team over to quickly finish their pre-game pitch inspection and head back into the locker room.

“We sort of wanted the game to start, we were so ready to go,” he continued. “Back in the locker room, I remember saying, ‘These guys are laughing at us. They think they’re going to beat us easily.’”

Mexico had done efficient work to get to that point. Having finished with seven points atop a group that featured Italy, Croatia and Ecuador, El Tri’s run to the Round of 16 had the side brimming with self-assurance ahead of the match.

“They were feeling confident, but the lack of respect they showed was clear – you never do that,” said Reyna. “I would never do that in my career, even if I felt really comfortable about beating an opponent. That you’d be giggling, laughing and joking at the opponent. It was pretty clear that it was directed at us and at some of our players, and obviously we play them all the time so there’s that rivalry.”

“I remember saying, ‘We’re not losing this game guys.’ Everyone went around and you could feel it all the way through that we couldn’t wait to get out there.”


Reyna gets past Ramon Morales in the most famous "Dos a Cero" in Men's National Team history.

Injuries and suspensions limited the U.S. options, and Bruce Arena used the uncertainty to confound the Mexicans by deploying a 3-5-2 formation for the match. The switch saw Reyna move from his regular central midfield position to the right flank, with the move paying off almost immediately. Following an eighth minute foul in the Mexico half, Brian McBride quickly restarted as he saw Reyna pushing up the flank. The U.S. captain beat two defenders to the end line before centering for Josh Wolff, whose deft touch teed up McBride for a clinical finish and an equally gratifying goal celebration.

The goal set an early tone and played perfectly into Arena’s game plan, allowing the U.S. to sit in and pick its moments to counter against an increasingly frustrated Mexican side. Landon Donovan’s second- half header off an Eddie Lewis cross helped ice the game, giving the MNT its first ever World Cup knockout round win and a quarterfinal date with Germany.

“It was just a great team performance. To beat them 2-0, eliminate them and afterwards realize this was a big deal back in the States,” Reyna said.

The win raised the profile of the Men’s National Team more than any other since the 1994 FIFA World Cup, but with games played in the middle of the night back home and in an age before social media, Reyna admitted the players didn’t realize how big an impact the victory had made.

“We didn’t know how huge it was at home,” he said. “We were in Korea and we knew it was sort of growing in momentum. I remember seeing some of the news clips from Mexico City where there were people in plazas and squares crying over the result – that felt good.”


U.S. supporters celebrate during the MNT's 2-0 win against Mexico at the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Though the momentum was already building towards U.S. domination of the rivalry, the World Cup win tipped the scales. Since 2000, the MNT has held a 13-7-5 advantage against El Tri.

“From that moment on, it continued to be a real domination of Mexico,” Reyna said. “We went on and beat them all the time. That was the point where we felt we were no longer playing behind them, that we were better than them.”

“It was one big coming out party on the biggest stage.” 

Read more
MNT Nov 30, 2016

Josh Wolff and the Spark that Set the Dos a Cero Fire

Originally published on October 6, 2015.

When the schedule for the Final Round of CONCACAF qualifying for the 2002 FIFA World Cup came around, the U.S. Soccer Federation had a different idea.

Drawn to play rivals Mexico first, and in February no less, U.S. Soccer decided to try and maximize home-field by taking advantage of the new phenomenon in the American game – the soccer specific stadium.

Columbus Crew Stadium (now MAPFRE Stadium) was the only one at the time, but with its smaller capacity and location in the heart of the Midwest, the venue proved a perfect spot for the U.S. to have its own unique home atmosphere in response to the heat, altitude and intensity that 100,000 fans at Azteca Stadium in Mexico City could provide. 

“It was a tremendous atmosphere,” remembered U.S. forward Josh Wolff. “It was brutally cold. We had a fantastic crowd and there was a lot to play for. Obviously it’s a qualifier, but it’s even bigger when you’re playing against Mexico. It couldn’t have been any nicer – a chilly night that the Mexican players probably didn’t enjoy, but for us, it was probably a bit of gamesmanship. I think we were excited about the idea of playing in front of our fans on a nice cold night where we could take advantage of it.”

Wolff didn’t start the match that night in late February 2001. When Bruce Arena selected him for the game-day 18, if he was to be used at all, the idea was more likely as a late-game sub.

After 15 minutes, things changed.

With Brian McBride’s right eye looking like he received a haymaker from Mike Tyson more than the clash of heads he took going up for a 50/50 ball, Wolff was called upon as his replacement and got his taste of the chippy nature in the match when he was shown a yellow card for a foul on Rafael Carmona in the 40th minute.

He was joined on the field just before halftime by an old, familiar face in Clint Mathis. Wolff’s former college teammate at the University of South Carolina was tapped to enter the game for Claudio Reyna, who pulled up with a groin injury after stepping to make a seemingly routine pass.

Having burned two subs to replace two of the side’s key players, Wolff and Mathis were certainly the unlikeliest of heroes for the second half, but they proved the odds wrong.

Just after the break, the South Carolina boys, who both hailed from neighboring Georgia, connected on what has become one of the more memorable goals in U.S. World Cup Qualifying history.

“The ball fell to Clint and Mexico was playing a pretty high line,” Wolff recalled. “Obviously I’d played with Clint for a number of years and we had a pretty good understanding of one another. It was just me taking a chance to run the line really well there.”

Mexico’s back line was so high that they were all pinching into the U.S. half of the field when Mathis quickly hit the ball into space for Wolff, who was a step inside the USA half of the midfield stripe.

“Clint hits a great ball over the top,” Wolff continued. “It’s a bit of a foot race with Jorge [Campos] and it was just one of those balls where it’s a 50/50 and I was able to come out with the other side of him. At that point, you just kind of roll it in the open goal and get on with the celebration. The goal was a scramble in the end, but it was a good way to start that game for me and helped fuel us the rest of the match.”

Read more
MNT Oct 18, 2016
×