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USA and Japan Play to Thrilling 3-3 Draw Before Sold Out Crowd in Colorado

COMMERCE CITY, Colorado (June 2, 2016) – The U.S. Women’s National Team fought back from an early 2-0 deficit to take a late lead only to see Japan score a late equalizer in a thrilling 3-3 draw before a sold out crowd of 18,572 fans at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park.

Japan took a surprising 2-0 lead midway through the first half as Mana Iwabuchi’s excellent shot from distance in the 14th minute and captain Yuki Ogimi’s sliding effort in the 22nd put the U.S. WNT in a two-goal hole at home for the first time in 117 matches.

Undaunted by Japan’s high pressing game, the WNT struck back through Alex Morgan just before halftime. The USA’s current goals leader in 2016 then equalized midway through the second half after Japan had been reduced to 10 players due to Ogimi being ejected for a second bookable offense.

With momentum on its side, the U.S. pressed for the winner and thought they had found it in the 89th minute when second-half sub and Denver native Lindsey Horan scored on her homecoming. The celebration was cut short however as Japan grabbed a late goal through Kumi Yokoyama for the final score line.

The U.S. WNT returns to the pitch in three days for the second leg of its two-game set vs. Japan on June 5 at FirstEnergy Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio. Kickoff is scheduled for 12 p.m. ET and the game will be broadcast on ESPN2.

Goal Scoring Rundown:
JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (Mizuho Sakaguchi) 14th minute:
An early spell of possession for Japan led to what seemed to be an innocuous attack when Sakagguchi fed Iwabuchi outside the top right corner of the USA’s penalty area. Cutting inside away from two U.S. defenders, Iwabuchi uncorked a stinging effort that arched over the outstretched arm of driving U.S. goalkeeper Hope Solo and into the upper left corner. USA 0, JPN 1 (SEE GOAL)

JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Emi Nakajima), 22nd minute: Japan attacked down the USA’s right flank and sent the ball out wide to Nakajima, who bent a cross into the six-yard box where the onrushing Ogimi lost her marker and slide hard to hit a first time shot into the lower left corner. USA 0, JPN 2 (SEE GOAL)

USA – Alex Morgan (Mallory Pugh), 27th minute: Julie Johnston initiated a flowing team sequence by finding Crystal Dunn with a pass at midfield. Dunn turned up the field and played a well-weighted chip into the path of Pugh down the right side. The 18-year-old Denver native raced past her defender and cut towards goal near the end line before finding Morgan on a trailing run with a quick pass. Morgan timed her run perfectly and powered her shot under Japan goalkeeper Ayaka Yamashita. USA 1, JPN 2 (SEE GOAL)

USA – Alex Morgan (Tobin Heath), 64th minute: From a free kick on the right wing, Heath served in a perfect bending ball that Morgan met at the top of the six-yard box. Out-leaping her marker, Morgan sent a strong header on target that Yamashita got a hand to but was unable to keep out of the net. USA 2, JPN 2 (SEE GOAL)

USA – Lindsey Horan (Kelley O’Hara), 89th minute: The USA broke quickly through midfield as second half sub Samantha Mewis found O’Hara making a run on the left wing. O’Hara took a controlling touch before lofting the ball toward the penalty spot. Horan beat a defender and the goalkeeper to the ball and headed home into the open net. USA 3, JPN 2 (SEE GOAL)

JPN - Kumi Yokoyama (Mizuho Sakaguchi) 94th minute: Despite being a player down and just conceding what looked to be the winning goal to the USA, Japan fought back to level terms on the final offensive thrust of the match. A neat passing sequence saw Sakaguchi receive the ball in the middle of the field and then picked up her second assist of the evening by slipping a pass behind the U.S. defense to Yokoyama, who took a touch and sent a well-placed strike low into the left corner for the final equalizer. USA 3, JPN 3 (SEE GOAL) FINAL

Next on the Schedule: The U.S. WNT and Japan face off the second time in quick succession on June 5 at FirstEnergy Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio (12 p.m. ET; ESPN2).

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Milestone Watch:

  • Hope Solo, who earned her 195th cap, remains on 98 shutouts for her career, but with three games left before the Olympics, could become the first goalkeeper to reach 100 before the USA leaves for Brazil. The USA plays Japan again in three days before facing South Africa for the first time in team history on July 9 at Soldier Field in Chicago and will play a yet to be announced match in late July.

Additional Notes:

  • The USA’s all-time record vs. Japan is now 25-1-7.
  • The three goals for each side equals the highest-scoring draw in USWNT history. It has occurred only three previous times, most recently vs. Germany in 2013.
  • Alex Morgan’s two goals tonight mark her 18th career multi-goal game. She now has 66 career goals, 10 of which have come in 12 games so far in 2016.
  • The only other time Morgan scored double-digit goals for the USA in a calendar year was in 2012, which, coincidently, also happened to be an Olympic year.
  • Tobin Heath now has four assists in 2016 and 25 for her career with the WNT.
  • Mallory Pugh’s assist was her team leading sixth of 2016.
  • Lindsey Horan’s goal was the second of 2016 and third of her career.
  • When down 2-0, it was the first time the USA had trailed by two goals at home in 117 games; the last time came in a 3-1 loss to Denmark in Nov. 2004.
  • The most recent time the USA fell behind 2-0 was Feb. 8, 2015 vs. France – a 2-0 friendly loss in Lorient, France in the team’s first game of that year.
  • The USA failed to tie its own record for most wins to start a calendar year. The USA won 12 in a row to start the year in 1991 and 1997. The USA is 11-0-1 in 2016.

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
Date:
June 2, 2016
Competition:
International Friendly
Venue:
Dick’s Sporting Goods Park; Commerce City, Colo.
Kickoff:
7:30 p.m. MT
Attendance:
18,572 (sell out)
Weather:
79 degrees, warm

Scoring Summary: 1  2  F
USA                        1  2  3
JPN                         2  1  3

JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (Mizuho Sakaguchi) 14th minute
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Emi Nakajima) 22
USA – Alex Morgan (Mallory Pugh) 27
USA – Alex Morgan (Tobin Heath) 64
USA – Lindsey Horan (Kelley O’Hara) 89
JPN – Kumi Yokoyama (Mizuho Sakaguchi) 90+3

Lineups:
USA:
1-Hope Solo; 5-Kelley O’Hara, 8-Julie Johnston, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn (capt.), 7-Meghan Klingenberg (11-Ali Krieger, 74); 14-Morgan Brian (20-Lindsey Horan, 61), 23-Allie Long, 2-Mallory Pugh; 16-Crystal Dunn (12-Christen Press, 61), 13-Alex Morgan, 17-Tobin Heath (3-Samantha Mewis, 84)
Subs Not Used: 6-Whitney Engen, 15-Emily Sonnett, 21-Alyssa Naeher
Head coach: Jill Ellis

JPN: 12-Ayaka Yamashita; 2-Saori Ariyoshi, 3-Tomoko Muramatsu, 4-Saki Kumagai, 19-Mayu Sasak (14-Yu Nakasato, 81); 7-Emi Nakajima, 10-Mizuho Sakaguchi, 6-Rumi Utsugi (5-Yuri Kawamura, 46), 9-Yuki Ogimi (capt.); 8-Sonoko Chiba (13-Rika Masuya, 62), 16-Mana Iwabuchi (20-Kumi Yokoyama, 56)
Subs Not Used: 1-Erina Yamane, 11-Yuika Sugasawa, 15-Hikari Takagi, 17-Ami Sugita, 18-Sakiko Ikeda
Head coach: Asako Takakura

Stats Summary: USA / JPN
Shots: 16 / 7
Shots on Goal: 6 / 4
Saves: 1 / 3
Corner Kicks: 7 / 1
Fouls: 4 / 14
Offside: 5 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (caution) 39th minute
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (caution) 57
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (ejection) 57
JPN – Saki Kumagai (caution) 63

Officials:
Referee: Margaret Domka (USA)
Assistant Referee 1: Lixy Enriquez (MEX)
Assistant Referee 2: Stephanie-Dale Yee Sing (JAM)
4th Official: Katja Koroleva (USA)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Alex Morgan

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WNT Jun 3, 2016

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
Date:
June 2, 2016
Competition:
International Friendly
Venue:
Dick’s Sporting Goods Park; Commerce City, Colo.
Kickoff:
7:30 p.m. MT
Attendance:
18,572 (sell out)
Weather:
79 degrees, warm

Scoring Summary: 1  2  F
USA                        1  2  3
JPN                         2  1  3

JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (Mizuho Sakaguchi) 14th minute
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Emi Nakajima) 22
USA – Alex Morgan (Mallory Pugh) 27
USA – Alex Morgan (Tobin Heath) 64
USA – Lindsey Horan (Kelley O’Hara) 89
JPN – Kumi Yokoyama (Mizuho Sakaguchi) 90+3

Lineups:
USA:
1-Hope Solo; 5-Kelley O’Hara, 8-Julie Johnston, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn (capt.), 7-Meghan Klingenberg (11-Ali Krieger, 74); 14-Morgan Brian (20-Lindsey Horan, 61), 23-Allie Long, 2-Mallory Pugh; 16-Crystal Dunn (12-Christen Press, 61), 13-Alex Morgan, 17-Tobin Heath (3-Samantha Mewis, 84)
Subs Not Used: 6-Whitney Engen, 15-Emily Sonnett, 21-Alyssa Naeher
Head coach: Jill Ellis

JPN: 12-Ayaka Yamashita; 2-Saori Ariyoshi, 3-Tomoko Muramatsu, 4-Saki Kumagai, 19-Mayu Sasak (14-Yu Nakasato, 81); 7-Emi Nakajima, 10-Mizuho Sakaguchi, 6-Rumi Utsugi (5-Yuri Kawamura, 46), 9-Yuki Ogimi (capt.); 8-Sonoko Chiba (13-Rika Masuya, 62), 16-Mana Iwabuchi (20-Kumi Yokoyama, 56)
Subs Not Used: 1-Erina Yamane, 11-Yuika Sugasawa, 15-Hikari Takagi, 17-Ami Sugita, 18-Sakiko Ikeda
Head coach: Asako Takakura

Stats Summary: USA / JPN
Shots: 16 / 7
Shots on Goal: 6 / 4
Saves: 1 / 3
Corner Kicks: 7 / 1
Fouls: 4 / 14
Offside: 5 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (caution) 39th minute
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (caution) 57
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (ejection) 57
JPN – Saki Kumagai (caution) 63

Officials:
Referee: Margaret Domka (USA)
Assistant Referee 1: Lixy Enriquez (MEX)
Assistant Referee 2: Stephanie-Dale Yee Sing (JAM)
4th Official: Katja Koroleva (USA)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Alex Morgan

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Five Things to Know About the U.S. Soccer Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module

As part of its continued effort to improve the quality of coaching at all levels, the U.S. Soccer Coaching Education Department has established eight new Grassroots Coaching License Courses that will serve as the foundation of its Coaching License pathway. Preceding these new Grassroots Course offerings is an online, cost-free Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module that will serve as an educational tool for coaches to become familiar with U.S. Soccer's approach at the grassroots level. Upon completion of this Introduction Module, coaches will have the ability to advance to any of the eight grassroots courses that best suits their needs.   

Here are five things you should know about the U.S. Soccer Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module:

What is it?

The Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module is the new first step for soccer coaches in the U.S. who are looking to start along their coaching pathway. The module, which is a free, 20-minute online experience through the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center, serves as the first step in obtaining any one of the eight new U.S. Soccer Grassroots Coaching Licenses: four in-person courses and four online courses across the four grassroots levels: 4v4, 7v7, 9v9, 11v11. The eight grassroots course options relate directly to small-sided games and the respective age-groups outlined in the U.S. Soccer Player Development Initiatives.

How do you take it?

To take the module, you must have a Digital Coaching Center (DCC) profile. If you do not have one, you can create one for free in the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center. After you have created an account, log in to your profile, and select "Courses" from the top menu. Under the "Available Courses" tab, you will see the option to "Begin Course" the introductory module. Once that's clicked, the module will launch, and you will on your way to completing your first Grassroots License!

Who can take the module?

Anyone can take the Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module. There is no prerequisite. It is available to anyone with a Digitial Coaching Center profile. Although it serves as an introduction, the U.S. Soccer Coaching Education Department highly encourages people of all experience levels to participate. Since it is designed to be an educational tool and preview of future courses, all those involved with U.S. Soccer's philosophy will benefit from taking part in the new experience.

Why is this being introduced into the U.S. Soccer Coaching Education License Pathway?

The Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module serves as an educational tool for coaches to become familiar with U.S. Soccer's approach at the grassroots level, including key terms and concepts that coaches will be exposed to throughout their coaching pathway progression. This cost-free introduction experience will provide coaches with information, resources and first-hand experience as to how the grassroots courses will function. The module is also an opportunity for coaches to get acquainted with the electronic learning portal through which the online courses will be delivered, the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center.

How will I know I have completed it?

Once the introductory module has been completed, the achievement will be visible within the DCC course classroom and participants will be sent a confirmation email. While the completion of the Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module does not result in a U.S. Soccer coaching license, coaches will gain the opportunity to advance to any of the eight grassroots courses of their choosing, across the four grassroots levels: 4v4, 7v7, 9v9, 11v11 (in-person and online).


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Jan 17, 2018

Five Things to Know About the Grassroots Pathway Coaching Initiative

Following the December 2017 announcement of the new Grassroots Coaching Pathway initiative, the U.S. Soccer Coaching Education Department began Grassroots Gathway rollout through the Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module, a cost-free, online experience available now via the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center.

With in-person and online grassroots coaching courses set to begin throughout spring 2018, here are five things you should know about the Grassroots Coaching Pathway initiative:

The New Grassroots Pathway

In an effort to further improve the grassroots soccer environment for both players and coaches, U.S. Soccer has restructured the foundation of its coaching license pathway. The new Grassroots Licensing Courses, which replace the F and E License Courses, offer an a-la-carte approach meant to empower coaches with education that is relevant to their specific coaching needs. The Grassroots Licenses will help coaches ensure fun, enjoyable, and developmentally appropriate environments for their players. Prospective coaches will have the option to partake in any of these new courses – in any sequence – after completing a cost-free, Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module provided by U.S. Soccer.

Coaching License Pathway

The Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module serves as the first step in obtaining any one of the eight new Grassroots Licenses: four in-person courses and four online courses across the four grassroots levels: 4v4, 7v7, 9v9, 11v11. The eight course options relate directly to small-sided games and the respective age-groups outlined in the U.S. Soccer Player Development Initiatives.

How to Advance in the Coaching Pathway

A unique combination of three of the eight Grassroots Licenses (replacing the E and F Licenses) now formally represent the prerequisite to progress to the U.S. Soccer D License. New coaches will use the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center to sign up for, and complete, a minimum of three grassroots courses, in the form of two in-person courses and one online course:

  • Two in-person courses (one of which must be the 11v11)
  • One online course across any of the four levels (4v4, 7v7, 9v9, 11v11)

Coaching candidates who have already completed or begun to take the E or F License courses will have the following opportunities to use those certifications toward the D License prerequisites:

  • U.S. Soccer E License + Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module
  • U.S. Soccer F License + Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module + 11v11 in-person license + one other in-person license

Online and In-Person Grassroots Course Availability

Beginning Jan. 17, the Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module will be available to anyone interested in starting, or continuing, their coaching license pathway, or anyone looking to learn more about grassroots soccer and coaching.

Of the eight new grassroots licensing courses at the base of the U.S. Soccer Coaching Pathway, the four in-person experiences will be available for sign-up as early as February. These in-person courses will be hosted by recognized member organizations of U.S. Soccer.

The four online courses will follow the rollout of the in-person opportunities in the coming months.

The Foundation of Grassroots Coaching

While typically affiliated with younger age groups, grassroots soccer exists at every level. Whether that is a youth environment where players are experiencing organized soccer for the first time, or adults who are looking to learn more and get into the sport, grassroots soccer continues to be the bedrock of the sport.

At its core, the philosophy of U.S. Soccer’s grassroots pathway initiative is Play-Practice-Play, a philosophy coaches learn about in the Introduction to Grassroots Coaching module. This approach will focus on the player experiencing and learning through play while also empowering the coach to support his or her player's learning and developmental needs.

Easy Access, Low Barrier

After completing the free Introduction to Grassroots Coaching module, candidates can progress to any of the eight Grassroots License course opportunities through the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center (DCC). This varied approach to the foundation of the coaching education pathway allows coaches to seek out education related to the environment in which they coach.

U.S. Soccer member organizations will organize and run in-person course opportunities for their coaches. These courses take place over four hours with two hours dedicated to classroom learning and two hours dedicated to field work. Coaches can contact their local member organization to inquire about scheduling and pricing.

Set to be released by U.S. Soccer in the coming months, the online Grassroots courses will be available for $25 in both English and Spanish on the DCC. This includes access to educational content, session plans and U.S. Soccer's Planning Tool. 

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Jan 17, 2018

U.S. Soccer Begins Launch of New Grassroots Coaching Pathway with Cost-Free Introductory Module

CHICAGO (Jan. 17, 2018) – Beginning today, U.S. Soccer will roll out its recently announced Grassroots Coaching pathway initiative with an introductory online coaching education module that any person interested in becoming a soccer coach can take at no cost. 

The Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module is now the first step for coaches to progress within the coaching pathway and learn about U.S. Soccer's coaching education philosophy. The new introductory module, which will take approximately 20 minutes to complete, can be accessed on the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center (DCC) and aligns with the Federation’s ongoing effort to improve the quality of coaches at all levels.

“Together, with our members, U.S. Soccer is concentrated on growing the game through grassroots education,” said Director of Coaching Administration Frank Tschan. “This introductory module will provide coaches with a preview of how they can better themselves in order to improve the experience and environment of our grassroots players.”

How to access and take U.S. Soccer’s Introduction to Grassroots Coaching Module:

  1. Visit U.S. Soccer’s Digital Coaching Center (DCC).
  2. Sign up (free of charge) or log-in to your DCC profile.
  3. Select “Courses” from the top menu.
  4. Under “Available Courses”, select “Begin Course” to launch the introductory module.
  5. Complete U.S. Soccer’s Introduction to Grassroots Coaching.

The free introductory module is a prerequisite to any of the U.S. Soccer Grassroots License courses, which focus on 4v4, 7v7, 9v9 and 11v11 sided games. Each Grassroots area of focus offers both an online and in-person course for a total of eight (8) Grassroots Licenses. Coaches who complete the introductory module will be provided four complimentary Play-Practice-Play training sessions, which coaching candidates will learn about within the introductory module.

Coaching License Pathway

In order to progress to the U.S. Soccer D License course, coaching candidates must hold an E License (which has been replaced by the Grassroots courses), or they can proceed after completing a minimum of two in-person courses (one of which must be the 11v11) and one online course across any of the four levels (4v4, 7v7, 9v9, 11v11). Candidates who previously earned the F License may use that certification to meet their online course requirement for any of the four Grassroots courses. Once the Grassroots License is complete, there is no waiting period before coaches can continue onto the D License.

“Children learn through play,” said U.S. Soccer Director of Coaching, Nico Romeijn. “As coaches, we must allow our players to experience the game, and our role as coaches at the grassroots level is to facilitate that experience. Through the new courses organized by U.S. Soccer and its members, coaches will be empowered with knowledge and practices to create a positive, fun learning environment for their players.”

Registration for the in-person courses for each of the four grassroots levels will be available in early February. When signing up for an in-person course, DCC users will have the ability to select a nearby U.S. Soccer Member Association that will administer the course.

Open registration for online grassroots courses will be available later this spring on the DCC.

Concurrently with the roll out of the new Grassroots courses, the F and E courses will transition out of the U.S. Soccer Coaching Pathway. These licenses will still be recognized by U.S. Soccer and both certifications remain relevant as a means to advance within the pathway.

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Jan 17, 2018

At Home on the Outside: U-20 WNT's Isabel Rodriguez Finds Her Place

Isabel Rodriguez didn’t believe she could ever be more excited than she was before the 2015 CONCACAF Women’s U-17 Championship and the ensuing 2016 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup in Jordan. Youth World Cups represent the culmination of two-year cycles of hard work. Now in preparation for the 2018 CONCACAF Women’s U-20 Championship in Trinidad &Tobago, Rodriguez has reached a new level of anticipation.

While she spent her youth club career playing all over the field, she has now cemented her status as one of the USA’s top left outside backs. The natural left-footer is uniquely suited to the position, and a full fall season as Ohio State’s starter in that position has Rodriguez rearing to go in Couva.

“I would normally play outside back with the U-17s but I definitely wasn’t as comfortable because I was playing other positions with my youth club,” Rodriguez said. “Now I feel a lot more confident. Ultimately, it helped playing there in college and getting a lot of experience.”

The position of outside back has rapidly evolved to require an exceptionally versatile set of skills. With the U-20s, Rodriguez takes on the role of a wing back. While still primarily a defender on the back line, there’s more two-way responsibility. She’ll swing up to make overlapping runs on the attack with forwards and provides an important passing option while still able to quickly transition to defense.

“It’s developed into an awesome position now,” Rodriguez said. “Outside backs get forward a lot. It’s not like you’re just a defender, you’re just an attacker, you get a little bit of both. You’ve got to be strong and you have to have a good personality.”

Rodriguez, known as Izzy to her teammates, stands out as one of the only left-footed outside backs in the current U-20 player pool. When U-20 WNT head coach Jitka Klimkova took the reins of the program in April 2017, that fact -- coupled with her unique skillset -- made her a tantalizing prospect at the spot. 

“We don’t have many left footed wing backs, that’s special and unique. She had everything we needed, we just needed her to play more games,” Klimkova said. “She’s amazing with attack. She’s grown to understand defending responsibilities much better. It’s a lot of decisions she needs to make, even in the defensive phase.”

But at Klimkova’s first camp in charge that April, Rodriguez still didn’t have a locked-in position. Even though she had played outside back with the U-17 squad, as one of the best players at her youth club, she was still accustomed to being utilized in multiple positions. Her club coaches wanted to get her more touches on the ball, and usually played her in the midfield.

That back-and-forth with club and country made it difficult for Rodriguez to get comfortable in any position at times during National Team camps. With college at Ohio State on the horizon that spring, Klimkova recommended that she make the switch full-time to outside back.

“In the younger age group, it’s really good to have more positions to get comfortable with the ball and with decision-making,” Klimkova said. “When you’re older, you should start to specify because you should understand the position 100 percent. If you want to really play well at this position, you need to play the games there. You can watch the games, you can watch the best wing backs, but when you play, that’s the best teacher.”

The results have paid dividends. Though OSU head coach Lori Walker recruited Rodriguez as a midfielder, she afforded Rodriguez the flexibility to switch. This season, Rodriguez started every game for the Buckeyes at left back and earned Big Ten All-Freshman team honors as the team won the conference title. Beyond the on-field results, an entire season playing consistently at one position has raised Rodriguez’s confidence and comfort.

“I definitely got more comfortable because I played in so many more games,” Rodriguez said. “Knowing when to go, when to stay back and even taking more risks now. I developed new techniques. I used to only do one thing and now I can do multiple.”

That experience has Rodriguez set to lock down the left side in Trinidad. While she’s zeroed in on her specialized position, she can continue to impact the entire field. The versatility of Rodriguez’s development grants a keen on-field vision that raises the level of the players around her.

“My play can help others,” Rodriguez said. “I know what their position is and what they do at that position. I can help them with my pass to them or telling them where they need to be. it’s a good quality to have experience with other positions to help you with outside back.”

Rodriguez and twelve others on the roster have experience navigating the CONCACAF gauntlet.  On the precipice of her second qualifying tournament, Rodriguez has arrived in Trinidad more confident- and more excited- than ever. 

“I want to start the games as soon as possible,” Rodriguez said. “Every opportunity is awesome. I’m definitely a lot more confident and ready to go than the last time around.”

 

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U-20 WNT Jan 17, 2018

How to Watch the USA at the 2018 CONCACAF U-20 Women's Championship

The U.S. Under-20 Women’s National Team begins its quest to qualify for the 2018 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup this week at the CONCACAF Women’s U-20 Championship in Trinidad & Tobago. The USA will compete in Group B, facing off against Nicaragua, Jamaica and Mexico.

Here’s everything you need to know about the group stage:

U.S. U-20 WNT ROSTER BY POSITION (CLUB; CAPS/GOALS)
GOALKEEPERS (2): Laurel Ivory (Virginia; Surfside, Fla.; 5/0), Amanda McGlynn (Virginia Tech; Jacksonville, Fla.; 2/0)  
DEFENDERS (7): Tierna Davidson (Stanford; Menlo Park, Calif.; 6/0), Naomi Girma (California Thorns FC; 6/0; San Jose, Calif.), Tara McKeown (USC; Newbury Park, Calif.; 11/0), Zoe Morse (Virginia; East Lansing, Mich.; 9/0), Kiara Pickett (Stanford; Santa Barbara, Calif.; 2/0), Isabel Rodriguez (Ohio State; Canton, Mich.; 8/0), Karina Rodriguez (UCLA; Torrance, Calif.; 3/0)
MIDFIELDERS (5): Samantha Coffey (Boston College; Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.; 7/1), Savannah DeMelo (USC; Bellflower, Calif.; 23/4), Jaelin Howell (Real Colorado; Windsor, Colo.; 12/0), Brianna Pinto (NTH Tophat; Durham, N.C.; 9/0), Viviana Villacorta (UCLA; Lawndale, Calif.; 10/1)
FORWARDS (6): Abigail Kim (California; Vashon, Wash.; 11/3), Civana Kuhlmann (Stanford; Littleton, Colo.; 12/8), Ashley Sanchez (UCLA; Monrovia, Calif.; 20/6), Sophia Smith (Real Colorado; Windsor, Colo.; 11/8), Taryn Torres (Virginia; Frisco, Texas; 3/1), Kelsey Turnbow (Santa Clara; Nashville, Tenn.; 8/2) 

IMPORTANT LINKS

GROUP B SCHEDULE

Date

Matchup

Time

Broadcast

Jan. 19

Mexico vs. Jamaica

3:00 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 19

USA vs. Nicaragua

5:30 p.m. ET

UDN

Jan. 21

Nicaragua vs. Mexico

4:00 p.m. ET

UDN

Jan. 21

Jamaica vs. USA

6:30 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 23

USA vs. Mexico

3:00 p.m. ET

UDN

Jan. 23

Nicaragua vs. Jamaica

5:30 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

USA VS. NICARAGUA
Date:
Jan. 19, 2018
Kickoff: 5:30 p.m. ET
Venue: Ato Boldon Stadium; Couva, Trinidad
TV Info: UDN, CONCACAF.com
Social Media: Twitter (@ussoccer_ynt) and Instagram (@ussoccer_ynt)

NICARAGUA ROSTER
GOALKEEPERS (3): Beykel Mendez (Unattached); Alicia Norori (Leyendas Futbol Club /NCA); Yahara Salmeron (Diriangen FC/NCA)
DEFENDERS (4): Gloria Bermudez (Leyendas Futbol Club /NCA); Sheyla Flores (Aguilas de Leon /NCA); Diana Ortega (Diriangen FC/NCA); Kesly Pérez (Leyendas Futbol Club/NCA)
MIDFIELDERS (6): Alis Cruz (UNAN Managua /NCA); Jaclyn Gilday Baquero (Unattached); Ariadna Meza (Aguilas de Leon /NCA); Natalie Orellana (Unattached); Katherine Pereira (Leyendas Futbol Club/NCA); Edy Pérez (Leyendas Futbol Club /NCA)
FORWARDS (7): Yessenia Flores (Diriangen FC/NCA); Alma Gutierrez (Real Esteli/NCA); Yorcelly Humphreys (Leyendas Futbol Club /NCA); Lisbeth Moreno (Somotillo F.C/NCA); Hormyne Paiz (UNAN Managua/NCA); Shanelly Treminio (Real Esteli/NCA); Elizabeth Vega (Unattached) 

USA VS. JAMAICA
Date:
Jan. 21, 2018
Kickoff: 6:30 p.m. ET
Venue: Ato Boldon Stadium; Couva, Trinidad
TV Info: UDN, CONCACAF.com
Social Media: Twitter (@ussoccer_ynt) and Instagram (@ussoccer_ynt)

JAMAICA ROSTER (CLUB)
GOALKEEPERS (2): Yazmeen Jamieson (Ontario University/CAN); Sydney Schneider (Match Fit Academy/USA)
DEFENDERS (7): Nevillegail Able (Waterhouse FC/JAM); Emily Caza (Seton Hall University/USA); Chyanne Dennis (University of South Florida/USA); Madiya Harriot (Vanderbilt University/USA); Jadyn Matthews (Orlando City Soccer Club/USA); Erin Mikalsen (East Carolina University/USA); Jayda Pelaia-Hylton (East Carolina University/USA)
MIDFIELDERS (4): Ebony Clarke (Richmond Girls Soccer/CAN); Gabrielle Gayle (Unattached); Alyssa Julien (Eastern Kentucky University/USA); Giselle Washington (Concorde Fire/USA)
FORWARDS (7): Olufolasade Adamolekun (United Soccer Alliance/USA); Jody Brown (St. Ann Women's FC/JAM); Marlee Fray (Sunrise Soccer Club/USA); Jazmin Grant (University of Houston/USA); Mireya Grey (University of Washington/USA); Kevena Reid (GC Foster College/JAM); Shayla Smart (Montverde Academy/USA)

USA VS. MEXICO
Date:
Jan. 23, 2018
Kickoff: 3:00 p.m. ET
Venue: Ato Boldon Stadium; Couva, Trinidad
TV Info: UDN, CONCACAF.com
Social Media: Twitter (@ussoccer_ynt) and Instagram (@ussoccer_ynt)

MEXICO ROSTER
GOALKEEPERS (2): Miriam Aguirre (Club Pachuca/MEX); Emily Alvarado (Texas Christian University/USA)
DEFENDERS (6): Samara Alcala(Club Atlas/MEX); Miriam Garcia (Club Guadalajara/MEX); Jimena Lopez (Texas A&M University/USA); Kim Rodriguez (Oklahoma State University/USA); Ashley Soto (SoCal Blues/USA); Mia Villegas (Davis Legacy/USA)
MIDFIELDERS (8): Dayana Cazares (Club America/MEX); Belen Cruz (Club Tigres/MEX); Alexia Delgado (Club America/MEX); Andrea Hernandez (Club Toluca/MEX); Montserrat Hernandez (Club America/MEX); Jacqueline Ovalle (Club Tigres/MEX); Maricarmen Reyes (West Coast FC/USA); Natalia Villarreal (Club Tigres/MEX)
FORWARDS (4): Norma Duarte (Club Guadalajara/MEX); Daniela Espinosa (Club America/MEX); Gabriela Juarez (Slammers FC/USA); Katty Martinez (Club Tigres/MEX)

GROUP A SCHEDULE

Date

Matchup

Time

Broadcast

Jan. 18

Costa Rica vs. Canada

3:00 p.m. ET

UDN

Jan. 18

T&T vs. Haiti

5:30 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 20

Haiti vs. Costa Rica

3:00 p.m. ET

UDN

Jan. 20

Canada vs. T&T

5:30 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 22

Haiti vs. Canada

3:00 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 22

T&T vs. Costa Rica

5:30 p.m. ET

UDN

NEXT UP

The top two teams from each group will qualify for the semifinals. Winners of each semifinal will clinch a berth in the 2018 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup. The third and final CONCACAF World Cup spot will be awarded to the third-place match winner.

Date

Matchup

Time

Broadcast

Jan. 26

Semifinal 1

3:00 p.m. ET

UDN

Jan. 26

Semifinal 2

6:00 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 28

Third-Place Match

1:00 p.m. ET

CONCACAF.com

Jan. 28

Final

4:00 p.m. ET

UDN

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U-20 WNT Jan 17, 2018
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