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U-20 MNT Defeats Costa Rica 2-0 in 2016 Under-20 Men's NTC Invitational

CARSON, Calif. (June 30, 2016) - The U.S. Under-20 Men’s National Team blanked Costa Rica 2-0 to lead the four-team tournament after the first day of the 2016 Under-20 NTC Invitational at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson.

The U.S. got off to an early lead in the ninth minute as Marcello Borges sent a ball across goal to Luca De La Torre who redirected to the far post with a slight touch. U.S. forward Jeremy Ebobisse waited for the ball and fired an easy finish to the back of the net, tallying his third goal of the year. After the early U.S. goal, Costa Rica was unable to counter, leaving the USA to lead the match going into halftime.

In the second half, the U.S. tallied minutes after the opening whistle as Ebobisse controlled a long pass angled away from the goal. He crossed it toward Sebastian Saucedo, who finished into the right side of the net, posting his second goal in 2016.

Earlier in the day, Japan and Panama played to a scoreless draw, earning one point each in the group.

The USA will face Panama on Friday, July 1, kicking off at 7 p.m. PT, after Japan plays Costa Rica at 2:30 p.m. PT.

All matches will be streamed live on U.S. Soccer’s YouTube page.

- U.S. Under-20 Men's National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Under-20 MNT vs. Costa Rica
Date:
June 29, 2016
Competition:
2016 Under-20 Men’s NTC Invitational
Venue:
U.S. Soccer National Training Center, Field 1; Carson, Calif.
Kickoff: 6:05 p.m. PT
Weather:
High 70s, sunny

Scoring Summary:            1              2              F
USA                                        1              1              2                                            
CRC                                       0              0              0 

USA – Jeremy Ebobisse (Luca De La Torre)                                  9th minute
USA – Sebastian Saucedo (Jeremey Ebobisse)                             52          

Lineups:
USA:
1-Jonathan Klinsmann; 2-Aaron Herrera (17-Marlon Fossey, 68), 13-Miles Robinson, 5-Auston Trusty, 3-Marcello Borges; 6-Danny Acosta (20-Jackson Yueill, 68), 8-Luca De La Torre (14-Hugo Arellano, 79), 9-Mukwelle Akale (15-Isaiah Young, 79); 18-Jeremy Ebobisse (19-Victor Mansaray, 84), 7-Eryk Williamson, 11-Sebastian Saucedo
Subs not used: 4-Andrew Lombard, 10-Weston McKinnie, 12-JT Marcinkowski, 16-Coy Craft, 21-Brandon Vazquez

Head Coach: Tab Ramos

CRC: 1-Alejandro Barrientos; 4-Pedro Morales, 19-Salinas Phillips (5-Esteban Gonzalez), 3-Airboin Carmona, 2-Kevin Espinoza (13-Dario Alfaro, 75); 11-Barlon Sequeira, 14-Roberto Cordoba (12-Andres Vargas, 83), 20-Eduardo Juarez; 6-Esteban Espinoza (15-Daniel Villegas, 75), 8-Marvin Loria (10-Kevin Masis 66), 9-Jimmy Marin (7-Ariel Zapata, 66)
Subs not used: 18-Ricardo Montenegro
Head Coach: Marcelo Herrera
 

Stats Summary: USA / CRC
Shots: 8 / 4
Shots on Goal: 5 / 3
Saves: 3 / 3
Corner Kicks: 5 / 0
Fouls: 18 / 32
Offside: 2 / 0 

Misconduct Summary:
USA – Eryk Williamson (caution)                    7th minute
CRC – Roberto Cordoba (caution)                  32
CRC – Barlon Sequeira (caution)                    44
USA – Danny Acosta (caution)                        54
USA – Auston Trusty (caution)                        55
CRC – Marvin Loria (caution)                         63
USA – Aaron Herrera (caution)                        67
CRC – Eduardo Juarez (caution)                     75
CRC – Airboin Carmona (caution)                  87
USA – Sebastian Saucedo (caution)                89

Officials:
Referee: Randall Kelley (USA)
Assistant Referee 1: Chris Elliot (USA)
Assistant Referee 2: Walt Heatherly (USA)
Fourth Official: Tim Ford (USA)

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U-20 MNT Jun 30, 2016

Match: U.S. Under-20 MNT vs. Costa Rica
Date:
June 29, 2016
Competition:
2016 Under-20 Men’s NTC Invitational
Venue:
U.S. Soccer National Training Center, Field 1; Carson, Calif.
Kickoff: 6:05 p.m. PT
Weather:
High 70s, sunny

Scoring Summary:            1              2              F
USA                                        1              1              2                                            
CRC                                       0              0              0 

USA – Jeremy Ebobisse (Luca De La Torre)                                  9th minute
USA – Sebastian Saucedo (Jeremey Ebobisse)                             52          

Lineups:
USA:
1-Jonathan Klinsmann; 2-Aaron Herrera (17-Marlon Fossey, 68), 13-Miles Robinson, 5-Auston Trusty, 3-Marcello Borges; 6-Danny Acosta (20-Jackson Yueill, 68), 8-Luca De La Torre (14-Hugo Arellano, 79), 9-Mukwelle Akale (15-Isaiah Young, 79); 18-Jeremy Ebobisse (19-Victor Mansaray, 84), 7-Eryk Williamson, 11-Sebastian Saucedo
Subs not used: 4-Andrew Lombard, 10-Weston McKinnie, 12-JT Marcinkowski, 16-Coy Craft, 21-Brandon Vazquez

Head Coach: Tab Ramos

CRC: 1-Alejandro Barrientos; 4-Pedro Morales, 19-Salinas Phillips (5-Esteban Gonzalez), 3-Airboin Carmona, 2-Kevin Espinoza (13-Dario Alfaro, 75); 11-Barlon Sequeira, 14-Roberto Cordoba (12-Andres Vargas, 83), 20-Eduardo Juarez; 6-Esteban Espinoza (15-Daniel Villegas, 75), 8-Marvin Loria (10-Kevin Masis 66), 9-Jimmy Marin (7-Ariel Zapata, 66)
Subs not used: 18-Ricardo Montenegro
Head Coach: Marcelo Herrera
 

Stats Summary: USA / CRC
Shots: 8 / 4
Shots on Goal: 5 / 3
Saves: 3 / 3
Corner Kicks: 5 / 0
Fouls: 18 / 32
Offside: 2 / 0 

Misconduct Summary:
USA – Eryk Williamson (caution)                    7th minute
CRC – Roberto Cordoba (caution)                  32
CRC – Barlon Sequeira (caution)                    44
USA – Danny Acosta (caution)                        54
USA – Auston Trusty (caution)                        55
CRC – Marvin Loria (caution)                         63
USA – Aaron Herrera (caution)                        67
CRC – Eduardo Juarez (caution)                     75
CRC – Airboin Carmona (caution)                  87
USA – Sebastian Saucedo (caution)                89

Officials:
Referee: Randall Kelley (USA)
Assistant Referee 1: Chris Elliot (USA)
Assistant Referee 2: Walt Heatherly (USA)
Fourth Official: Tim Ford (USA)

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US Soccer

Cindy Parlow Cone: "Like a Kid in a Candy Store"

Cindy Parlow Cone’s path to the National Soccer Hall of Fame started with a decision she made as a 16-year-old – to leave Germantown High School in Memphis a year early and enroll at the University of North Carolina.

“The whole reason behind going to UNC early was to try to make the 1996 Olympic team,” Parlow Cone recalled on the eve of her induction as part of the 2018 National Soccer Hall of Fame Class. “The crazy thing to me now is why I even felt like I had a chance to make that team. I had never been a part of the National Team. In retrospect, it set my life on a whole new course.”

That course included three national championships at UNC, two national collegiate Player of the Year trophies, four All-American awards, two Olympic Gold medals, one bronze, a World Cup championship, and now a spot in the National Soccer Hall of Fame, which opens the doors to its newest permanent home in Frisco, Texas on the weekend of Oct. 20, 2018. “It’s really nice to be honored this far past your playing career,” she added. “Hopefully people have seen that I’ve tried to continue to have a positive impact on our game.”

Trying to Absorb the Moment
That decision to attend UNC 23 years ago began an 11-year National Team career starting with the 1996 Olympics, the first Games in history to include a Women’s Football Competition. “Just being a part of the Olympics was unbelievable,” said Parlow Cone, a rangy attacking midfielder throughout her more than decade-long career. “I was like a kid in a candy store. I took pictures of everything and just tried to absorb every moment. I didn’t know if it would be my last time.”

USA 1999 Women's World Cup champions
Parlow (far right) celebrates winning the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup with teammates Kristine Lilly (left) and Tisha Venturini.

Her role with the National Team went from a seldom-used sub in ’96 to a prominent role in 1999. She started all six games of the 1999 World Cup and scored twice en route to a historic world title for the U.S. WNT. “In ’99, I remember feeling like our sport had finally arrived,” said Parlow Cone, who later went on to coach the NWSL’s Portland Thorns, first as an assistant and then as head coach. “It was just so cool to see our sport and our team having such an impact, and it was amazing to see that impact continue after the World Cup in the growth of our sport and girls sports.”

Being elected to the Hall of Fame has given her a chance to reflect. Parlow Cone’s National Team career spanned 158 games, and her 75 goals ranks fifth all-time for the U.S. But when she thinks back, it’s not the goals or victories that stand out. “It just keeps coming back to the people,” she said. “So many people have impacted my life in so many ways. I made the [U.S. National] Team when I was 17, so in those really formative years I was surrounded by some great people and great leaders, really intelligent and strong women. It shaped who I am.”

Captain for Life
She points to two people in particular. “I always try to learn something from everyone I meet, and I truly think I learned something from every teammate I had. But if I had to point to a couple I really learned a lot from, one would definitely be Carla Overbeck. I call Carla my Captain for Life. I learned how to treat people, how important it was to get to know everyone and how to motivate them.

“She [Overbeck] went out of her way to come to my room when I was injured in my first camp. She talked to me for like 30 minutes, which had to be painful because I probably said two words the entire time. For the captain of the National Team to do that for me was amazing.”

The other is the player she roomed with on her first international trip. “For the trip to Brazil in January of ‘96, they roomed me with Mia Hamm,” she said. “I was like ‘Oh my God.’ I had her poster in my room back home. I didn’t know what to do. She would get a phone call, and I would be like ‘Should I leave, should I stay, what do I do?’ But she was super nice.”

What really stayed with Cindy is how Hamm handled the withering public attention. “Mia was in the spotlight all the time,” she explained. “Everyone wanted a picture with her, wanted her autograph, wanted to talk to her. Just watching how she handled all that was incredible. She is a quiet, reserved, private person not seeking the limelight, but she knew how important her role was for our team and our game.”

Hamm Guides the Way
“[Hamm] always talked about her team and always deflected praise back to her teammates. It was just a really impressive thing to watch,” added Parlow Cone, full of praise for an understated legend of the game. It had to be challenging and exhausting for someone as introverted as her. But seeing her navigate all that and how selfless she was at every turn will always stay with me.”

U.S. WNT coaches Cindy Parlow, Anson Dorrance
Parlow Cone at training with famed coach Anson Dorrance, who coached her at UNC and with the WNT.

Parlow Cone uses all she learned over her years as a youth soccer coach. She is a Director of Coaching for girls with the North Carolina Football Club, a 13,000-player club in the Triangle area of North Carolina, where she lives with her husband John and their son Steven, who turned a year old on Oct. 11 “The biggest adjustment in coaching was I had to set my competitiveness aside,” she says. “I had to meet players where they were and then help them get to where they want to be.”

And Cindy Parlow Cone, from her own journey from Germantown High to the National Team and now the Hall of Fame, knows how to get you where you want to be.

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WNT Oct 16, 2018
US Soccer

Five Things to Know About the National Soccer Hall of Fame

A new, state-of-the-art National Soccer Hall of Fame opens its doors at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas on the weekend of Oct 20-21, before opening to the public in November. Here are five things to know before you go.

The weekend of October 20-21, 2018 will see the doors thrown open on a brand new National Soccer Hall of Fame. On the site of Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas – home to Major League Soccer’s FC Dallas – the new NSHOF offers fans a chance to sample the unique, 150-plus-year history of the game in America through high-tech, hands-on exhibits, recently unearthed artifacts and user experiences. A gala opening weekend includes the induction of the Class of 2018 on Saturday, Oct. 20, including U.S. National Team legends Brad Friedel and Tiffeny Milbrett, an MLS regular season contest between FC Dallas and Sporting Kansas City, a Legends game to mark the 50th anniversary of the old North American Soccer League (NASL) and performances by musical guests Imagine Dragons and the Revivalists. 

Historic Partnership
The National Soccer Hall of Fame was born as part of a $55 million renovation of Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas and is a public-private partnership between MLS, FC Dallas, the City of Frisco, the Frisco Independent School District and the U.S. Soccer Federation. The new NSHOF, located at the south end of Toyota Stadium, is also the first major league Hall of Fame in history to occupy the grounds of an operating stadium. The NSHOF has been without a home for the past nine years after the closing of the original Hall of Fame in Oneonta, New York – opened in 1979 and recognized by U.S. Soccer as the official National Soccer Hall of Fame – closed its doors in 209.

National Soccer Hall of Fame
National Soccer Hall of Fame

Entrance to the new National Soccer Hall of Fame in Frisco, Texas

Soccer’s History Meets the Future
The historical value of unearthed artifacts will be brought to life via a high-tech and highly interactive experience for visitors. The use of Facial Recognition will drive the visitors’ experience and make the NSHOF among the most personalized experiences in any sports setting. In all, the NSHOF Experience is a 19,350-square foot segment of the NSHOF that will honor the past while fully incorporating modern technology of the present and future, including virtual reality, gesture technology, and interactive digital video boards throughout to celebrate the players, veterans, and builders of American soccer. It will feature interactive exhibits, iconic soccer memorabilia and serve as the home for Hall of Fame induction ceremonies annually from 2018 forward.

Who’s Going In?
The 2018 NSHOF Induction Ceremony will kick off opening weekend’s festivities on Saturday. This year’s Induction class is comprised of U.S. Men’s National Team, Liverpool and Tottenham goalkeeper Brad Friedel, currently head coach of Major League Soccer side New England Revolution, and two legends of the U.S. Women’s National Team, Tiffeny Milbrett and Cindy Parlow Cone, who will all receive the traditional red blazers presented to Hall of Famers. MLS Commissioner Don Garber (elected for induction in 2016, but who wished to be honored this year as part of the celebrations surrounding the opening of the new NSHOF location) and Dr. Bob Contiguglia, former President of U.S. Soccer, will also be honored in the Builders category. Legendary broadcaster JP Dellacamera, winner of the 2018 Colin Jose Media Award will also be honored during the induction ceremony. In addition to the inductees themselves, previous Hall of Famers like Eric Wynalda, John Harkes, Jeff Agoos, Werner Roth and Dr. Joe Machnik and many more will also be in attendance. 

What’s Going On?
The weekend won’t just be about nostalgia and red blazers. Two-time Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup winners FC Dallas will host four-time Open Cup toppers Sporting Kansas City on Sunday Oct. 21 at Toyota Stadium (4. p.m. CT). Both sides have already booked their place in the 2018 MLS Cup Playoffs and currently occupy first (FC Dallas) and second (SKC) place in the league’s ultra-competitive Western Conference. Following the game, there’s likely to be a slower pace to the Legends match that will honor the 50th anniversary of the old North American Soccer League (NASL) which operated from 1968 to 1985. Among the legends expected to take the field are Tatu, Kyle Rote Jr. and Hall of Fame goalkeeper Arnie Mausser. And on Saturday night, cleats are swapped for street shoes as Toyota Stadium will sway to the sounds of musical guests Imagine Dragons and New Orleans roots-rock outfit the Revivalists.

Lost Treasures Revived
As any Hall of Fame worth its salt must, the new NSHOF has its share of relics to help highlight a century-and-a-half of soccer in the United States. Among these artifacts, some only recently unearthed from their decades of slumber, is the original Dewar Cup trophy. Commissioned in 1912 (two years before the first U.S. Open Cup tournament – then the National Challenge Cup) by whiskey magnate Sir Thomas Dewar, the trophy has been repaired, updated and primped to take its rightful place among the historical treasures of the American game. It will also form the focal point of the most comprehensive display of Open Cup artifacts ever gathered in one place. Also on display will be an NASL-at-50 special exhibit with vintage uniforms from those crazy days of the 1970s and original tickets. There will be gold medals from the Women’s World Cup and Olympic games and three Women’s World Cup trophies in an overall collection spanning the 19th and 20th century all the way up to 2018.

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MNT WNT Oct 15, 2018
US Soccer

JP Dellacamera: “Inform, Educate & Entertain”

Broadcasting isn’t shooting the breeze at your local bar. Commentary is not casual. Or passive. Just ask JP Dellacamera, an iconic voice of American soccer who’s spent the last 30 years preparing detailed gameday charts, knowing when to amp up the energy in his voice in accordance with events on the field and, crucially, when to let the game action speak for itself. “It’s about three things: to inform, educate and entertain,” he offered after winning the 2018 Colin Jose Media Award and earning a place in the National Soccer Hall of Fame among many of the soccer legends he’s studied, appreciated and commented on. “If you hit all three of those, you really nailed it; but two out of three is pretty damned good.”

His first taste of the game came in the late 1960s and ‘70s. He grew up on the outskirts of Boston, Massachusetts at a time when his high school didn’t even have an organized soccer team. Fittingly, for a man who would go on to provide broadcast commentary for some of the most seminal moments of the American game, Dellacamera’s first flashes of soccer came through a television set. “I had a fascination with watching whatever limited soccer there was on TV at the time – Soccer Made in Germany and the explosion of the North American Soccer League [NASL] later and the arrival of Pele.”

Dellacamera went into Boston to watch the old Shamrock Rovers, who played a year (1967) in the old United Soccer Association League and the Boston Beacons who lasted about the same amount of time (1968) before the Minutemen and Tea Men went on to live slightly longer lives. But it wasn’t the sunshine and green grass of Fenway Park – transformed for soccer gamedays back then – that brought the aspiring broadcaster his earliest professional work. “My first experiences broadcasting soccer was indoor. It all started there,” said Dellacamera, who went on to call nine consecutive FIFA World Cups on TV or radio, and five Women’s World Cups. “Outdoor [soccer] wasn’t that popular in the early 80s. Indoor was the place, in those years, to satisfy the soccer urge.”

Inside-Out
Working for the now-defunct Pittsburgh Spirit and St Louis Steamers of the old Major Indoor Soccer League (MISL), Dellacamera combined his knowledge and passion for ice hockey and soccer in that peculiarly American hybrid game, complete with dasher boards and penalty boxes. “People forget that indoor soccer thrived at one point and you had 19 thousand people coming out for some of those franchises,” he said of a time when the Steamers often outdrew their local NBA and NHL counterparts.

When the indoor craze passed, outdoor soccer in America was a wave about to crest. The critical date was November 19, 1989. The venue: Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain, Trinidad. The U.S. Men needed a win to qualify for their first World Cup in 40 years. What came next was the so-called ‘Shot Heard ‘Round the World’ – Paul Caligiuri’s long-range dipper that sent the Americans back to the Cup after 40 years in the wilderness. “I like to think of it as the billion-dollar goal because if you track everything that’s come from that goal it was easily worth that amount,” said Dellacamera, now 66, who remembers having to go to the stadium that day hours early for fear that even those with media accreditation would have trouble getting in. “There were bogus tickets and we were told they were going to stop letting people in at some point. The day before the game, I went around the city and people had painted their houses red and their cars red. In the stadium, everything was red except for two rows of American fans in white.”

It’s as iconic a moment as exists in American soccer. It paved the way for the U.S. hosting the World Cup in 1994 and the birth of MLS in 1996. And Dellacamera’s staccato call of the goal was understated, a lesson he learned from boyhood non-soccer idols of the broadcast booth like Bob Costas, Al Michaels and, especially, Brent Musburger.

Ramos. Putting it in. To Caligiuri. Beats the first man. A left footed shot. Paul Caligiuri has scored a goal and the USA lead one nothing…

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MNT WNT Oct 15, 2018

Brad Guzan Will Return to Goal Against Peru

While MNT head coach Dave Sarachan wasn’t willing to tip his hand too much during the pre-match press conference on the USA’s starting lineup against Peru, he did confirm that a player with a wealth of experience will backstop the U.S. defense when he announced that Brad Guzan will start against La Blanquirroja.

The news didn’t come as much of a surprise, but was all but confirmed when Zack Steffen departed camp after experiencing tightness in his right hamstring following Thursday’s match against Colombia. 

Guzan debuted for the MNT all the way back in 2006 and did so with a bit more hair on his head. Tuesday’s match will mark his 59th appearance for the MNT and first in more than a year. The Atlanta United FC ‘keeper last stood between the sticks during the USA’s 1-1 World Cup Qualifying draw at Honduras on Sept. 5, 2017, in San Pedro Sula.


Brad Guzan debuted for the MNT in a 4-0 win against Guatemala on Feb, 19, 2006 (ISI Photos)

While it’s been over a year since he suited up for the MNT, the veteran told ussoccer.com on Monday that nothing has changed in the way he’ll approach things.

“Just being involved with the group, I’ve always said it’s an honor and privilege to be with this team. To be able to get a game is always exciting. It should be a good night.”

Guzan joined Michael Bradley as the two long-time MNT veterans that returned to the side during this camp. At 34, he will be the oldest player to appear for a U.S. team that has emphasized its youth throughout 2018.

Even as the next generation of MNT players has gained great experience and earned some quality results this year, the return of veteran presence to the team was inevitable, with the experience and leadership they can provide serving as important attributes to a group that will soon tackle competitive matches in the Concacaf Gold Cup, Nations League and World Cup Qualifying.

At the start of camp, both players said they were looking forward to getting to know and helping guide their younger teammates. So coming up on the end of the international break, how has it looked?

“It’s been good,” Guzan said. “Obviously in terms of off the field things, they have different things going on their life than I do. It’s been interesting, and quite frankly it’s been fun to be able to talk to them, get to know them on a personal level and see how they’re doing. Ultimately when you step across the white line, in terms of training and games, it’s about trying to get results and moving this thing forward.”

Brad Guzan speaks to Fafa Picault ahead of training last week in Tampa (ISI Photos)

The next opportunity for a result comes against Peru. Guzan watched from the bench as the U.S. team rebounded to take the lead, but ultimately fell 4-2 to Colombia.

Asked what the youngsters in front of him could take from the experience, Guzan said, “every international, regardless of who you play, is going to be a challenge.”

“It’s important for us to learn from the Colombia game in the sense of making sure we’re able to dictate the game on our terms and not let the it get away from us. Come Tuesday night it’s going to be important that we’re able to get on the ball and keep the ball for stretches at a time, and not just try to hit a home run ball with the first or second pass, and the ball turns over and we’re defending again.”

“It’s going to be important that we get that right.”

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MNT Oct 15, 2018
US Soccer

Teenagers Getting Their Chance with the MNT in 2018

One of the main points of emphasis for the U.S. Men’s National Team in 2018 has been to offer the next generation of players a taste of the senior international level.

In doing so, MNT head coach Dave Sarachan has already given 16 players debuts in 2018, a number that could go as high as 19 should Jonathan Amon, Reggie Cannon and Aaron Long take part in Tuesday night’s Kickoff Series match against Peru (7:30 p.m. ET; ESPN2, UniMas, UDN). 

The chances of at least one more debut seems high after Sarachan said Monday that he planned numerous changes to the lineup from Thursday's match against Colombia. 

For those interested, the year 2018 already comes in at third most debuts during the modern era (1990-present), ranking behind only 1992 (21) and 2007 (20). Of those that have taken their first step with the MNT this year, 11 have been age 22 or under and nine are age-eligible for the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Perhaps most notable is the record number of teenagers that have represented the MNT in 2018. Five players – Tyler Adams, Josh Sargent and Tim Weah, as well as recently turned 20-year-olds Weston McKennie and Christian Pulisic – have run out for the MNT while teenagers this year.

That total beats out the modern era record of four set just last year, and could increase to six if Amon steps on the field Tuesday night.

MNT Most Teenage Minutes by Calendar Year (1990-present)

Year

Number

Players

2018

5^

Tyler Adams, Weston McKennie, Christian Pulisic, Josh Sargent, Tim Weah

2017

4

Tyler Adams, Cameron Carter-Vickers, Weston McKennie, Christian Pulisic

2014

3

Julian Green, Emerson Hyndman, Rubio Rubin

2007

3

Freddy Adu, Jozy Altidore, Michael Bradley

2002 and 2001

3

DaMarcus Beasley, Bobby Convey, Landon Donovan

1996

3

Ramiro Corrales, Jorge Flores, Jovan Kirovski

All caps accounted for were earned while player was a teenager
^Number could increase to six if Jonathan Amon plays Tuesday against Peru.

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MNT Oct 15, 2018
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