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Umberto Abronzino. Northern California soccer official who helped to form San Francisco’s Peninsula Soccer League in 1957 and served as its secretary-treasurer for more than a decade. Emigrated from Italy in 1937 and played for and coached several teams in Connecticut before moving to California in the 1950s. Among his many administrative duties in northern California, he was a major force in the development of youth soccer in that region. Inducted in 1971.

Milton Aimi. Chairman of the U.S. Soccer Federation’s amateur division in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Beginning in the 1950s, Aimi had filled a string of administrative positions in Texas and national soccer, including serving as president of the Houston District Junior Soccer Association and the Texas State Soccer Association, and as a vice president of U.S. Soccer. Inducted in 1991.

Julius Alonso. An official of the American Soccer League for decades, serving in such positions as secretary, vice president, business manager and executive secretary. Before becoming involved with administration of the league in 1947, he had been an official of the Brooklyn Hispano Club. Alonso was born in Spain and came to the United States as an infant in 1906. Over the years, he was a player, coach and official at Spanish clubs in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere. Inducted in 1972.

Willie Anderson. A New York soccer official in the 1950s and ’60s. Anderson served as president and secretary of the Southern New York State Association, as well as being president of the National Soccer League of New York from 1952 to 1957. Later was registrar of the Eastern New York State Soccer Association, of which he was a member for more than 25 years. Inducted in 1956.

Philip Anschutz. The owner of several Major League Soccer franchises and credited with keeping that league going through financial difficulties around 2000. Began as the investor/operator of the Colorado Rapids in MLS’s inaugural season of 1996, but his interests later expanded to include involvement with five other teams, although he later scaled back those to just two teams. Involved in financial backing of numerous soccer efforts. Inducted in 2006.

John Ardizzone. An official of several northern California soccer organizations. Served the California Soccer Football Association in various capacities, including as president from 1954 to 1956. Was secretary of the San Francisco Soccer Football League for two long stretches, from 1947 to 1954 and again from 1966 until his death in 1982, and was instrumental in inaugurating the entry of San Francisco teams into the U.S. Open Cup. Inducted in 1971.

Bruce Arena. A national team and Major League Soccer coach. Arena was coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team from 1998 to 2006, including the 2002 and 2006 World Cups, the 1999 and 2003 Confederations Cup and more than 30 World Cup qualifiers. He coached three teams in MLS – D.C. United, the New York Red Bulls and the LA Galaxy – winning MLS titles in 1996 and 1997 with D.C. and 2011 with the Galaxy. Coach of the U.S. team at the 1996 Olympic Games. Inducted in 2010.

James Armstrong. General secretary of the United States Football Association for more than a decade. Armstrong became secretary of the USFA in 1931 and served in that position until 1943, being particularly involved in the United States efforts in the 1934 World Cup and the 1936 Olympic Games. Had earlier been manager of the New York Nationals and New York Giants teams of the American Soccer League and was secretary of the ASL from 1924 to 1928. Inducted in 1952.

Joe Barriskill. General secretary of the United States Soccer Football Association for 28 years. Barriskill, who was born in Northern Ireland, became general secretary in 1943, when the organization was still named the U.S. Football Association. He served under 12 USSFA presidents, through six World Cup cycles, and retired from the job in 1971. Before being secretary, he had been vice president of the USFA from 1932 to 1934 and president from 1934 to 1936. Inducted in 1953.

Clay Berling. Founder and longtime publisher of Soccer America magazine, the leading American soccer publication from the North American Soccer League era to the Major League Soccer era. Berling, a youth soccer league official, started a weekly newsletter titled Soccer West in 1971, and changed the name a year later to Soccer America. Berling, who worked as an insurance agent, sustained Soccer America through some difficult early times, and by the 1990s, the magazine had become a recognized international authority in the sport. Inducted in 1995.

John O. Best. A longtime FIFA international referee. Best was certified as a FIFA referee from 1948 to 1963 and was a linesman at the 1948 Olympic Games in London and a referee at the 1955 Pan-American Games in Mexico City. He was the first American referee to receive FIFA’s Special Award for service in at least 20 international matches and was a vice president of the USSFA/USSF from 1967 to 1974 and 1976 to 1979. Inducted in 1982.

Joseph Booth. Organizer of a string of soccer organizations in Connecticut. Within 15 years after he emigrated from England in 1910, Booth organized the Connecticut State Association, the Connecticut Junior League, the Bridgeport Public Schools League, the Eastern League, the Connecticut Referees Association, the Connecticut State Amateur League and the Connecticut State Football Players Protective Association. Secretary of the Connecticut State Association for 25 years. Inducted in 1952.

Matthew “Matt” Boxer. Northern California soccer official who held various positions on the San Francisco soccer scene. Boxer served as president of the San Francisco Football Association and Junior Soccer Commissioner for the USSFA. He managed the visits to California for a number of touring European teams and played a large role in gaining government support for the building of soccer facilities. Inducted in 1961.

Gordon Bradley. Coach of the New York Cosmos for the first five years of the team’s existence. In addition to coaching the Cosmos from 1971 to 1975, Bradley returned for a second spell as Cosmos coach from the middle of the 1976 season to the middle of the 1977 season and then was coach of the Washington Diplomats from 1978 to 1980. Bradley was coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team for several games in 1973, with his appearance on the field in one game making him the only player-coach in that team’s history. Inducted in 1996.

Lawrence Briggs. Soccer coach at the University of Massachusetts for 37 years. Briggs, who became coach at UMass in 1930, was one of the original members of the National Soccer Coaches Association of America at that organization’s formation in 1941 and served as the NSCAA’s president in 1947. He also was involved in the movement that resulted in the formation of the National Intercollegiate Soccer Officials Association. Inducted 1978.

John Brock. A member of the first soccer team at Springfield College who later became coach of the Maroons. Brock began playing at Springfield in 1906. He returned to the college as a faculty member in 1920 and became head soccer coach in 1929. Brock retired from that position before World War II, but he came out of retirement to coach Springfield through two undefeated seasons in 1946 and 1947. Inducted in 1950.

Andrew M. Brown. President of the American Football Association at the time of the formation of the U.S. Football Association in 1913 and the man who convinced the other members of the AFA to join the new organization. Later was president of the USFA and played a key role in helping it to fend off penalties sought by Austria and Hungary in 1927 over player signings by ASL teams. Was a delegate to the 1929 FIFA meetings at which the decision to hold the first World Cup the following year was made. Inducted in 1950.

Thomas W. Cahill. Leading administrator of American soccer in the first half of the 20th century and involved in the sport in a variety of ways. Cahill was the first general secretary of both the United States Football Association and the original American Soccer League after having been heavily involved in the founding of both of those organizations. He was the editor of the annual Spalding soccer guides and manager of the first three American teams to make European tours, in 1916, 1919 and 1920. Inducted in 1950.

Walt Chyzowych. Coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team in two World Cup Qualifying campaigns. Chyzowych was national team coach from 1976 to 1980, coaching the team in 22 games. At the time, he was the longest serving coach in the team’s history, both in years and games. Nine of those 22 games were in the qualifying rounds of the 1978 and 1982 World Cups. He had been a star forward for the Philadelphia Ukrainian Nationals powerhouse in the 1960s and played three full internationals for the United States. Inducted in 1997.

John “Jack” Coll. Physical trainer of the U.S. team at the inaugural World Cup in 1930. Coll’s fitness regimen, particularly during the long boat trip to Uruguay, was considered a significant factor in the team’s excellent performance in that World Cup. Coll, who had emigrated from Scotland in 1922 at the age of 29, had trained a number of successful American soccer clubs, including Chicago Bricklayers, Scullin Steel of St. Louis and three ASL teams – New York FC, New York Giants and Brooklyn Wanderers. Inducted in 1986.

George Collins. The manager of the first U.S. National Team to enter the Olympic Games, in 1924. Had earlier served as secretary of the Massachusetts State Association and third vice president of the U.S. Football Association, and he assisted in creating the National Amateur Cup competition. Was a soccer writer for the Boston Globe from 1914 to 1950. Inducted in 1951.

Peter Collins. President of the Long Island Junior Soccer League for more than 27 years. Collins, who was born in Ireland, served as president of the LIJSL from 1977 to 2004 and during his tenure, he oversaw the growth of that league from 300 teams to more than 1,200. He established joint tournaments between his league and youth leagues in Russia, Ireland and Italy. Inducted in 1998.

Colin Commander. A leading Ohio soccer official from the 1940s to the 1960s. Commander, who was born in England, became secretary of both the Cleveland Soccer League and the Ohio state association in 1948 and held the latter position for nearly 20 years. He served as a national cups commissioner for the U.S. Soccer Football Association from 1950 to 1957. Played for various Ohio teams between 1922 and 1939, and was secretary of the Cleveland Americans team that reached the U.S. Open Cup final in 1945. Inducted in 1967.

Thomas “Ted” Cordery. A leading northern California soccer official from the 1950s to the 1970s. Cordery was secretary of the California Soccer Association for 20 years after being chosen for that position shortly after his retirement as a player in 1955. Also served as a national junior cup commissioner and a national cups coordinator. Had played for Rovers, Mercury, Olympic Club and Viking during his 21 years in the San Francisco Soccer League. Inducted in 1975.

Robert B. Craddock. Official and administrator at various levels of Pittsburgh-area soccer. Craddock, the father of fellow Hall of Famer Bob Craddock, emigrated from England as a child in 1907. After his playing days, he served as president of the Greater Pittsburgh League, the West Penn League and the Allegheny Valley League. Was a district commissioner for the U.S. Open Cup and the National Amateur Cup. Inducted in 1959.

Edmund “Whitey” Craggs. A team manager, referee and league official in Washington state from the 1940s to the 1960s. Craggs, who was born in Ceylon, emigrated to the United States in 1947 at the age of 50 after having lived for more than 40 years in England and Canada. He served as commissioner of the Washington State Soccer Football Association from 1957 to 1961. Father of fellow Hall of Famer George Craggs. Inducted in 1969.

George Craggs. A referee at both the state and national levels. Craggs was a USSFA national referee for 23 years. He had begun refereeing senior games in Washington state in 1962 at the age of 33 and later refereed in the North American Soccer League. Served as treasurer and referee coordinator for the Washington State Soccer Referees Association from 1962 to 1978. Inducted in 1981.

Wilfred Cummings. Manager of the United States team that reached the semifinals of the first World Cup in 1930 and author of a landmark report to the U.S. Football Association on that trip. At the time of that World Cup, Cummings was both treasurer of the USFA, a position he had held since 1923, and manager of the Chicago Bricklayers team that reached the final of the U.S. Open Cup the following year. Was secretary-treasurer of the Illinois State Association for more than 30 years. Inducted in 1953.

Joseph Delach. President of the Keystone League of Western Pennsylvania from 1962 to 1983. Delach, who also served as a National Amateur Cup Commissioner for 10 years, had been both a player and manager for the Beadling SC of Bridgeville, Pa., including several championship teams. The 1958 team that he managed won both the Keystone League and the West Penn Cup and reached the final of the National Amateur Cup. Inducted in 1973.

Enzo DeLuca. A founder of both the Italian-American Soccer League of New York and the Italian-American Soccer League of New Jersey in the 1950s. DeLuca, who was born in Italy, was a sports correspondent for Il Progresso, the Italian-language daily newspaper in New York. Had participated in New Jersey State League games as a player, manager and referee. Inducted in 1979.

Tony DiCicco. Coach of the U.S. team that won the 1999 Women's World Cup. DiCicco was coach of the U.S. women's national team from 1994 to 1999, winning 103 games, losing eight and tying eight. DiCicco's first major tournament in charge of the U.S. team was a third-place finish at the 1995 Women's World Cup, but he led the U.S. women to victory in the first Olympic women's soccer tournament a year later. Was later commissioner of the WUSA for three years and coach of the Boston Breakers in WPS for two years. Inducted in 2012.

Edward Donaghy. The first American ever named to referee a game between two other countries. Donaghy, who had been a star player for Bethlehem Steel and several other teams between 1911 and 1919, refereed all three games of the World Cup qualifying series between Mexico and Cuba in Mexico City in March 1934. He had begun refereeing in western Pennsylvania after the end of his playing career and refereed the U.S. Open Cup finals in 1930 and 1934. Inducted in 1951.

George Donnelly. A New York soccer official. Donnelly was president of the National Soccer League of New York from 1966 to 1971, president of the Eastern New York Senior Soccer Association from 1972 to 1977, and president of the Cosmopolitan Soccer League (formerly the German-American Soccer League) from 1983 to 1985. Also served in USSF positions, as chairman of the Appeals Committee and a member of the USSF delegation at the 1988 Olympic Games. Inducted in 1989.

Anson Dorrance. One of the premier women’s soccer coaches in the world at the collegiate and international levels. Dorrance’s University of North Carolina teams, the greatest dynasty ever in American college sports, won the NCAA woman’s soccer title 18 of the first 25 years that it was held and have included such stars as Mia Hamm, Carla Overbeck and April Heinrichs. He was coach of the U.S. Women’s National Team from 1986 to 1994, coaching it to victory in the first Women’s World Cup in 1991. Inducted in 2008.

John Dresmich. Chairman of the West Penn Soccer Commission from 1955 until his death in 1966. Dresmich was involved in a number of aspects of western Pennsylvania soccer, including managing both the Curry and Morgan teams, organizing the West Penn Referees Association and the Washington County League and serving as a member of the West Penn Soccer Commission beginning in 1940. Inducted in 1968.

Duncan Duff. Leader of several major soccer organizations in southern California. Duff was president of the Greater Los Angeles Soccer League beginning in 1953 and president of the California-South State Association beginning in 1959. Had served as secretary of both of those organizations before becoming president. Began his off-the-field soccer career as manager of Los Angeles Magyar AC, one of the teams for which he had played. Inducted in 1972.

Gene Edwards. President of the United States Soccer Federation from 1974 to 1984. Before becoming USSF president, Edwards had been a vice president since 1968. Served as a member of the FIFA Amateur Committee, the CONCACAF Executive Committee and the Executive Committee of the United States Olympic Committee. Edwards, who lived most of his life in Milwaukee, was manager of the United States teams at the 1971 and 1975 Pan-American Games and the 1972 Olympic Games. Inducted in 1985.

Rudy Epperlein. A longtime mainstay of soccer in Buffalo and western New York. Served for 25 years as president of the North West Inter City League. Was involved throughout his soccer career with the Beck’s team of Buffalo, a perennial powerhouse in western New York soccer, and was a promoter of games between Buffalo teams and touring teams from as far as Germany. Inducted in 1951.

Ahmet Ertegun. The younger of the two Turkish-born brothers who were involved in the management of the New York Cosmos throughout that team’s existence. Originally, Ahmet Ertegun was vice president of the Cosmos, but in 1977, when his brother Nesuhi was moved up to chairman of the board, Ahmet was promoted to president. He later served as a member of the Board of Directors of the organization that ran the 1994 World Cup in the United States. Inducted in 2003.

Nesuhi Ertegun. The older of the two Turkish-born brothers who were involved in the management of the New York Cosmos throughout that team’s existence. Originally, Nesuhi Ertegun was president of the Cosmos. He moved up to chairman of the board after Clive Toye departed from the Cosmos in 1977. The original contact that led to the founding of the Cosmos began with a chance meeting between Nesuhi Ertegun and NASL commissioner Phil Woosnam in Mexico in 1970. Inducted in 2003.

Harry Fairfield. President of the U.S. Soccer Football Association from 1945 to 1948. Fairfield earlier served in various capacities in western Pennsylvania soccer, including two terms as president of the West Penn Association and three as secretary of that organization, including one from 1936 to 1950. During his term as USSFA president, he helped to organize the North American Confederation of the United States, Canada, Mexico and Cuba in 1947. Inducted in 1951.

Ernst Feibusch. Coach and administrator in San Francisco at both the high school and senior levels. Began coaching the San Francisco Vikings, a team he had played on for 20 years, in 1966, and simultaneously coached them and Lowell High School for many years. After retiring as a player in 1955, he served as president of the San Francisco Soccer Football League until 1959 and also was secretary of that league until 1975. Inducted in 1984.

John Fernley. The second president of the U.S. Football Association, serving in that position from 1915 to 1917. Fernley was a delegate from Southern New England at the time that the USFA was founded in 1913 and was elected as first vice president of the new organization. He then was president of the USFA at the time that it formed the first U.S. National Team, sending that team on a tour of Sweden and Norway in 1916. Inducted in 1951.

Charles Ferro. Soccer writer for the New York Spanish-language newspaper La Prensa, one of a number of foreign-language newspapers that were a key factor in promoting the sport in American for many decades. Ferro also was a referee in the Metropolitan League of New York in the 1940s and had earlier been a goalkeeper during his playing career. Inducted in 1958.

George Fishwick. President of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1963 to 1965. Since 1942, Fishwick had been editor and publisher of the National Soccer News, a monthly soccer newspaper that was published in Chicago until the 1970s and is considered the forerunner of Soccer America. Secretary of the National Soccer League of Chicago from 1948 to 1954 and later chairman of the Promotion-Publicity and National Amateur Cup committees of the USSFA. Inducted in 1954.

Jack Flamhaft. President of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1959 to 1961. Flamhaft, a lawyer, had a huge influence on the USSFA’s legal matters, including work on its constitution and by-laws and representing the USSFA in court. Flamhaft, an American Soccer League player and official at Hakoah, and president of the American Soccer League for five years, had been a delegate to USFA and USSFA conventions since 1935 and was a legal adviser to the organization for decades. Inducted in 1964.

Harry “Pup” Fleming. One of the officials of the Philadelphia Old-Timers Soccer Association who was instrumental in the founding of the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 1950. Involved in administration of the Hall of Fame until it was taken over by the USSFA in 1953. Had earlier been owner-manager of the Fairhill Club, a leading Philadelphia amateur team, and an officer of the Allied and Pennsylvania leagues. Inducted in 1967.

Powys A.L. Foulds. An organizer of teams and leagues in Massachusetts and elsewhere in New England. Foulds, who was born in England and emigrated to the United States from Canada in 1909, was president of the Massachusetts state association and was involved in promoting games between Massachusetts teams and teams from Quebec and New Brunswick. The father of fellow Hall of Famer Sam T.N. Foulds. Inducted in 1953.

Samuel T.N. Foulds. A great historian of American soccer. Foulds was historian of the United States Soccer Federation from 1972 to 1994 and historical consultant to the National Soccer Hall of Fame from 1979 to 1994. Earlier, he had been an official of teams and leagues in Massachusetts and New Hampshire for decades, including serving as president of the Eastern Massachusetts League, the Boston and District League, the Massachusetts State League and the New England League. Inducted in 1969.

Dan Fowler. A leading Rochester soccer official. Fowler was president of the Northwestern New York state association from 1951 to 1961, and he also served as president and treasurer of the Northwestern Inter-city League and secretary of the Northwestern New York state association. Played at the senior level until his retirement in 1948. The husband of fellow Hall of Famer Margaret Fowler. Inducted in 1970.

Margaret Fowler. Secretary of both leagues and associations in upstate New York. In 1947, Fowler became secretary of the Rochester and District Soccer League Senior Division. She served in that position for many years and eventually became secretary of the Northwestern New York state association as well. The wife of fellow Hall of Famer Dan Fowler. Inducted in 1979.

Bob Gansler. The coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team in 1989, when it qualified for the World Cup for the first time in 40 years. In addition to coaching at the 1990 World Cup, Gansler also was coach of the United States team at the 1989 World Under-20 championships. At the club level, he coached both the Kansas City Wizards of Major League Soccer and the Milwaukee Rampage of the A-League to league titles. Gansler coached Kansas City for eight MLS seasons and was named the MLS Coach of the Year in 2000. Inducted in 2011.

Prudencio “Pete” Garcia. The first American to serve as an official at the World Cup. Garcia, who was born in Spain and emigrated to the United States as a child, was a linesman at four games of the 1950 World Cup, two in the group stage and two in the final group. Garcia refereed in the Municipal League of St. Louis from 1937 to 1957 and was a founder of Missouri Referees Association. Inducted in 1964.

Walter Giesler. President of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1948 to 1950 and manager of the United States team at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. A former player with Ben Millers of the St. Louis professional league, Giesler rose through the ranks of Missouri soccer administrators after retiring as a player, including serving as chairman and secretary of the Missouri Soccer Commission. Inducted in 1962.

David Gould. Coach of the United States team that played in the 1934 World Cup in Italy. Gould, who was born in Scotland and emigrated to the United States as a teenager, had been an assistant coach at the University of Pennsylvania for 23 years at that point. He had been a player for several prominent Philadelphia teams between 1891 and 1911 before turning to coaching. Inducted in 1953.

Don Greer. A chairman of the United States Youth Soccer Association from 1974 to 1984 after having been one of the founders of that organization in 1974. During his tenure as USYSA chairman, that organization launched the McGuire Cup, the Olympic Development Program and regional youth programs for state associations. Its number of participating players ballooned from 32,000 to more than 1.3 million. Served as a USSFA/USSF vice president from 1972 to 1984. Inducted in 1985.

Robert “Bob” Guelker. Coach of the St. Louis University teams that won the NCAA soccer championship in five of the first seven seasons that event was held. Later won two more NCAA titles as coach at Southern Illinois University. Guelker, who was president of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1967 to 1969, was coach of the United States team at the 1972 Olympic Games. He had been executive director of St. Louis’ Catholic Youth Council, an important youth soccer organization, from 1946 to 1969. Inducted in 1980.

Dr. Joseph “Joe” Guennel. A missionary for the sport throughout the midwest, founding teams and leagues that included the Indiana University Soccer Club, which decades after its founding in 1949 became a perennial national champion. Guennel was a member of the United States Olympic Committee for 12 years and was president of the National Soccer Coaches Association of America and the Colorado state association. Inducted in 1980.

George Healey. President of the United States Football Association from 1919 to 1923. Before becoming the fourth president of the USFA (after fellow Hall of Famers Gus Manning, John Fernley and Peter Peel), Healy had been president from 1913 to 1919 of the Michigan state association, which he had helped to found, and a USFA vice president from 1916 to 1919. Inducted in 1951.

Herb Heilpern. President of the German-American Soccer League of New York from 1970 to 1973, and a prime mover in that league’s early association with the North American Soccer League and the New York Cosmos. Served as soccer coordinator for the city of New York, helping to develop soccer facilities in the city, and was heavily involved with both the German-American Junior Soccer League and the Eastern New York Youth Soccer Association. Inducted in 1988.

William Hemmings. President of the National Soccer League of Chicago for more than 20 years. Hemmings, who was born in England and came to America as a teenager in 1921, had played for teams in Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Illinois before becoming president of the NSL in 1946. He oversaw considerable growth in that league before retiring from his position in 1970. Inducted in 1961.

Robert Hermann. Donor of the trophy bearing his name that is given each year to the outstanding male and female players in American college soccer. Hermann was owner of the St. Louis Stars and California Surf of the North American Soccer League from 1968 to 1980 and chairman of the NASL’s executive committee. He was involved in the formation of the National Professional Soccer League in 1966 and one of the leaders of that league until it merged with the United Soccer Association in 1968 to form the NASL. Inducted in 2001.

Ted Howard. A North American Soccer League executive for more than 10 years. Howard, who began working for the NASL in 1971, served in a variety of positions, including Administrative Assistant, Director of Administration, Director of Operations and Executive Director. From 1998 to 2011, he was Deputy General Secretary of CONCACAF and served as Acting General Secretary in 2012. Inducted in 2003.

Maurice Hudson. Secretary of both the California Football Association and the San Francisco Soccer League from 1935 to 1950. Hudson, who was born in England and came to the United States as a teenager in 1907, played from 1910 to 1926 for the San Francisco Barbarians club that captured the California State Cup four times during that period and also was a member of the U.S. Army team that played an the Inter-Allied Tournament in Paris in 1919. Inducted in 1966.

Lamar Hunt. A leading owner of pro soccer teams in both the North American Soccer League and Major League Soccer and a crucial part of American soccer’s financial backing. Hunt was one of the initial investors in both leagues and stayed with those investments through difficult times, particularly the NASL crisis of 1969. He financed the building in 1998 of the Columbus Crew Stadium, then the largest stadium ever built specifically for soccer in the United States. In 1999, the U.S. Open Cup was renamed the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup in his honor. Inducted in 1982.

Alfredda Iglehart. A leading educator in the sport of soccer from the 1920s to the 1950s. Iglehart taught in Baltimore public schools for more than 30 years and during that time, taught the fundamentals of soccer to more than 1,200 boys, including future Hall of Famer Millard Lang and future professional players Bill Schwange, Bob Delawschmutt and Johnny Sherry. Inducted in 1951.

Bill Jeffrey. The coach of the United States team that played in the 1950 World Cup in Brazil and scored its famous upset win against England. Jeffrey, who was born in Scotland and came to the United States as a teenager in 1920, became soccer coach at Penn State University in 1925. He continued in that job into the 1960s, winning 10 national championships along the way. Inducted in 1951.

Jack Johnson. A referee at a high level of Chicago soccer, handling both local and national games from 1919 to 1939. The highlight of Johnson’s refereeing career came in 1931, when he handled the second leg of the U.S. Open Cup final between Chicago Bricklayers and the Fall River Marksmen. For many years, he was a soccer correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. Inducted in 1952.

Mike Kabanica. A Wisconsin soccer official for decades. Kabanica, who was born in Yugoslavia and emigrated to the United States in 1950, was president of the Wisconsin Soccer Association for most of the 1970s and ’80s. Before becoming president, he had been a member of the association’s board of directors from 1962 to 1972. A player and coach with the Milwaukee Serbians for 20 years before getting into soccer administration. Inducted in 1987.

Bob Kehoe. The first American-born coach in the North American Soccer League. In addition to coaching the St. Louis Stars in the 1969 and 1970 NASL seasons, Kehoe also was coach of the U.S. National Team in World Cup qualifying in 1972. Had earlier been a star player for years with St. Louis’ Kutis powerhouse and was captain of the U.S. National Team in World Cup qualifying in 1965. Inducted in 1989.

Frank Kelly. A leading New jersey soccer official. Kelly, who was born in Ireland and moved to American in his 30s in 1955, was a founding member of the New Jersey Youth Soccer Association and was prominent in New Jersey youth soccer for years. He served as national chairman of the McGuire Cup, a member of the executive board of the United States Youth Soccer Association and a member of the board of directors of the United States Soccer Federation. Inducted in 1994.

George “Barney” Kempton. Secretary of the Washington state association for decades. Kempton also served as junior commissioner and a soccer correspondent for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Kempton, who was born in Northern Ireland and came to America as a young man in 1910, played for teams in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Vancouver and Prince Rupert before retiring as a player in 1934. Inducted in 1950.

Paul Klein. Manager of the Elizabeth SC team that won a series of honors in the late 1940s, including the National Amateur Cup in 1949, the New Jersey State Challenge Cup in 1949 and the German-American League championship in 1947, 1948 and 1949. Klein, who was born in Egypt and moved to America from Germany in 1923, had taken over as manager of the team in 1941 after a playing career with several New Jersey clubs. Inducted in 1953.

Alfred Kleinaitis. The first American referee assigned to referee a game between two European teams in Europe, handling an Ireland-Soviet Union game in 1990. Kleinaitis, who was a FIFA international referee from 1985 to 1990, also refereed the NCAA championship game in five different years between 1980 and 1989, club internationals, North American Soccer League games and World Cup qualifiers. Inducted in 1995.

Oscar Kozma. President of the Greater Los Angeles Soccer League from 1952 to 1958. Kozma, who was born in Hungary, had a long career as a player and coach in Los Angeles area soccer before getting into administration. He held the title of honorary president of the Greater Los Angeles Soccer League for years after serving as its president. A member of the board of the Southern California Soccer Association from 1953 to 1955. Inducted in 1964.

Frank Kracher. A longtime Illinois soccer official. Kracher served in a variety of administrative positions with the National Soccer League of Chicago, the Illinois state association, the United States Soccer Football Association and the Chicago Mustangs and Chicago Sting of the North American Soccer League. Was chairman of the U.S. Soccer Federation National Soccer Hall of Fame Selection Committee from 1995 to 1999. Inducted in 1983.

Ray “Granny” Kraft. A referee at national and international levels. Kraft was a FIFA international referee from 1960 to 1966 and also handled games in the American Soccer League, New York’s International Soccer League, the National Professional Soccer League and the North American Soccer League. Played for and managed numerous teams in the Baltimore area, including the Pompeii team that reached the U.S. Open Cup final in 1958. Inducted in 1984.

Harry Kraus. An official of the German-American Soccer League and other soccer organizations in New York. President of the German-American League from 1947 to 1952. Secretary of the New York state association from 1932 to 1947. Vice president of the United States Football Association from 1937 to 1946. Secretary of the Southern New York state association in the 1960s. Inducted in 1963.

Kurt Lamm. General secretary of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1971 to 1987. Lamm, who was born in Germany and came to the United States as a teenager in 1936, was the federation’s chief administrator through most of the North American Soccer League era. He had earlier been a player, manager and administrator in the American Soccer League, serving as vice president of that league from 1959 to 1963 and president from 1963 to 1968. Inducted in 1979.

Bert Larson. An influential figure in Connecticut soccer for decades. Larson held numerous positions in the Connecticut Soccer Association and the Connecticut Youth Soccer Association from the 1940s to the 1970s and was a soccer correspondent for the Hartford Courant for 25 years. His playing career before World War II was primarily with Boston Swedish and Providence Vikings. Inducted in 1988.

Horace Edgar Lewis. The guiding force behind the Bethlehem Steel powerhouse team. Lewis, who was born in Wales and came to the United States as a child in 1896, was executive vice president of the Bethlehem Steel Corp. from 1916 to 1930. A player with the Bethlehem team in its early years, he gave it an advocate in the leadership of the corporation that few factory teams had. In 1926, Lewis donated the cup that was awarded annually to the winner of the American Soccer League’s league cup tournament. Inducted in 1950.

Giuseppe Lombardo. A leader of Italian soccer activities in New York. A founder of the Brooklyn Italians soccer club, he served as president and secretary of that club from 1951 to 1972. An official of the National Soccer League of New York from 1967 to 1972 and the Southern New York state association from 1969 to 1984. Helped to found the Italian-American Soccer League of New York in 1958. Inducted in 1984.

Dennis Long. A major supporter of soccer in St. Louis and elsewhere through the Anheuser-Busch company. As president of Ansheuser-Busch, he developed Budweiser’s world-wide support for soccer and was chairman of the committee that built the St. Louis Soccer Park. Served as a counselor to the founders of both the North American Soccer League and the Major Indoor Soccer League. Inducted in 1993.

John MacEwan. An Ohio and Michigan soccer official. MacEwan was president of both the Cleveland Soccer League and the Ohio state association in the 1920s. After World War II, he moved to Michigan, where he served as secretary of the Michigan Commission for 11 years and then was president of the Ohio state association again in 1958 and 1959. A vice president of the United States Football Association from 1934 to 1936. Inducted in 1953.

Enzo Magnozzi. A team official and game promoter in New York. Magnozzi, who was born in Italy and moved to the United States in 1930 as a child, founded the Inter Soccer Club in 1960, three years before it merged with Giuliana to form a powerful combination. Later became a promoter and was involved in staging many games in New York featuring teams from around the world. President of the German-American League of New York from 1981 to 1983. Inducted in 1977.

Jack Maher. A trainer, referee and administrator in Chicago soccer for decades. Maher was trainer of the Chicago Sparta club in its professional years from 1927 to 1938, including its U.S. Open Cup victory in 1938. He was president of the Pell Cup association for 10 years, referee of the 1948 U.S. Open Cup final and president of both the Illinois Referees Association and the National Soccer League of Chicago. Inducted in 1970.

G. Randolph “Gus” Manning. The first president of the United States Football Association and the first American to be a member of the FIFA executive committee. Manning, who was born in Germany, was one of the founders of the USFA in 1913 and served as its president until 1915, when he entered the army. He later was president of the New York state association from 1928 to 1948, was a member of the U.S. Olympic Committee and was named to the FIFA executive committee in 1948. Inducted in 1950.

John Marre. St. Louis soccer official who organized and managed several leading teams in the 1930s and ’40s. Marre, who was credited with helping to keep the sport alive in St. Louis during the Depression, was a member of the Missouri state commission for more than 10 years and served on the National Cup Committee. He earlier played for the St. Leo’s and St. Theresa’s teams in their best years in the early 20th century. Inducted in 1953.

Allan McClay. An official of several important Massachusetts soccer organizations. McClay, who was born in England and came to America as a child in 1905, was president of the Massachusetts state association from 1949 to 1970, secretary of the Massachusetts State League from 1964 to 1970 and secretary of the Boston and District League from 1946 to 1970. One of the organizers of the New England League in 1962 and the Massachusetts State League in 1964. Inducted in 1971.

Frank McGrath. The sports editor of the Fall River Herald-News from 1928 to 1979. McGrath was one of the leading soccer journalists in the country during the heyday of Fall River, New Bedford and Pawtucket teams in the 1920s and ’30s. McGrath, who lived his entire life in Fall River, had begun his newspaper career with a rival publication, the Fall River Globe, but moved to the Herald-News in 1928 and stayed for more than half a century. Inducted in 1978.

James McGuire. President of the United States Soccer Football Association for two separate terms, from 1952 to 1954 and from 1971 to 1974. During his second term as USSFA president, McGuire was a member of the FIFA Organizing Committee for the 1974 World Cup in West Germany. McGuire, who was born in Scotland, was president of the American Soccer League from 1947 to 1950, after having played in that league in the 1930s, winning a U.S. Open Cup title with St. Mary’s Celtic of Brooklyn in 1939. Inducted in 1951.

Dent McSkimming. St. Louis newspaperman who was the only American reporter at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil, where the United States upset England. McSkimming worked for newspapers in St. Louis and elsewhere from 1913 to 1961. He was on vacation at the 1950 World Cup, rather than having been sent there by the paper he worked for, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, but covered the games as part of his decades-long campaign to help keep soccer in the public eye. Inducted in 1951.

Peter Merovich. A long-time western Pennsylvania soccer official and player. Merovich served as secretary-treasurer of both the Keystone League and the West Penn state association and also was a national cups commissioner for the U.S. Soccer Football Association. He played in the Keystone League from 1937 to 1956, including reaching the National Amateur Cup final with Castle Shannon in 1946. Inducted in 1971.

Al Miller. The first American coach to lead his team to the North American Soccer League championship. Miller, who had been an outstanding college coach at Hartwick, was coach of the Philadelphia Atoms from 1973 to 1975, including their title season of 1973. He then coached the Dallas Tornado through 1980, the Calgary Boomers in 1981 and the Tampa Bay Rowdies in 1982 and ’83. Coached the U.S. Men’s National Team for two games in 1975. Inducted in 1995.

Milton Miller. A New York newspaperman who covered soccer in that city from the 1930s to the 1960s. At one time or another, Miller worked for the New York World-Telegram and Sun, PM, the New York Journal-American and the Long Island Press. Miller and his wife founded and published the Soccer News, a monthly paper, beginning in the early 1950s, and she continued it for several years after his death in 1969. Inducted in 1971.

Jimmy Mills. Coach who led his teams to six American Soccer League championships in eight years. Mills, who coached at the pro, college and youth levels at the same time, was coach of the Philadelphia Nationals teams that won the ASL in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953, and the Uhrik Truckers teams that won in 1955 and 1956. Mills, who was born in Scotland and came to the United States in 1922 at the age of 28, also was coach of the U.S. team at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne. Inducted in 1954.

James Moore. St. Louis referee and administrator in the 1940s and ’50s. Moore refereed in St. Louis leagues for 17 years after retiring as a player in 1939 and served as president of the St. Louis Referees Association. Was chairman of the Missouri Soccer Commission and represented that organization at USSFA conventions 20 times. Involved in the formation of the St. Louis Major League in 1947. Inducted in 1971.

William Morrissette. An administrator in southern New England from the 1940s to the 1970s. Morrissette was secretary of the Southern New England Soccer Football Association beginning in 1949 and was a national cup commissioner for the USSFA. He served as vice president and treasurer of the Fall River District Soccer league, secretary-treasurer of the Inter-State Soccer League and secretary-treasurer of the New England Soccer League. Inducted in 1967.

Fred Netto. President of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1950 to 1952. Netto’s work with the USSFA included serving as a member of the United States delegations at the 1948 Olympic Games in London, World Cup qualifying in 1949 in Mexico City and the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. Had been secretary of the Illinois Soccer Commission beginning in 1939. Inducted in 1958.

Ron Newman. A coach in the North American Soccer League, the American Soccer League, the Major Indoor Soccer League and Major League Soccer. Newman was coach of the Dallas Tornado, Fort Lauderdale Strikers and San Diego Sockers in the NASL, the Los Angeles Skyhawks of the ASL, the San Diego Sockers of the MISL and the Kansas City Wizards of MLS. He won an NASL title with Dallas in 1971, an ASL title with Los Angeles in 1976 and eight MISL titles with San Diego. Inducted in 1992.

Demitrios “Jimmy” Niotis. An Illinois soccer official for decades. Niotis, who was born in Greece, was president of the junior division of the National Soccer League of Chicago and later was elected as a life member of that league. Later served on the Illinois Soccer Committee and the Pan-American Games Committee, and was chairman of the USSFA Youth Promotion Committee. Inducted in 1963.

William Palmer. Secretary of the Eastern Pennsylvania state association from 1914 until his death in the 1940s. Palmer, who was born in England and emigrated to the United States in 1908, also served for many years as secretary of Philadelphia’s Allied Amateur Cup tournament and on various committees of the United States Football Association. He was chairman of the USFA’s finances committee. Inducted in 1952.

Eddie Pearson. The director of officials of the North American Soccer League. Pearson, who was born in England and had been an English FA referee, came to the United States in 1967 to referee games played by the National Professional Soccer League. One year later, after the merger that created the NASL, he was named the NASL’s chief referee and in 1973, became the league’s director of officials, a position he held until his death in 1978. Inducted in 1990.

Peter J. Peel. A longtime Illinois soccer official who was president of the United States Football Association for two terms, from 1917 to 1919 and from 1923 to 1924. Peel, who was born in England and stayed in America after coming here for the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, was president of the Illinois state association and donated the Peel Cup that for many years was the Illinois state championship trophy. During his second term as USFA president was in charge of the U.S. team at the 1924 Olympics in Paris. Inducted in 1951.

Wally Peters. Midfielder who was a member of the Kearny Scots teams that won five consecutive American Soccer League championships between 1937 and 1941. After retiring as a player, Peters, who was born as Walter Paricciuolo, was the manager of the Paterson Dovers, games chairman for the New Jersey State Association as well as District Commissioner for the USSFA National Cups and numerous other positions in soccer in New Jersey.

Don Phillipson. Secretary of the Colorado state association from 1970 to 1978 and a vice president of the U.S. Soccer Federation from 1975 to 1977. During his years as secretary of the Colorado association, Phillipson completely revised the structure and operation of the organization, particularly in the area of communication between the association and the state’s teams and players. Inducted in 1987.

Giorgio Piscopo. A founder of the Italian-American Soccer League of New York in 1937 and later a founder of the Brooklyn Italians team. Piscopo, who was born in New York but grew up in Italy before moving back to the United States in 1928 at the age of 16, was president of the Italian-American Soccer League of New York from 1954 to 1961. A player for the Waverly and Giuliana clubs. Inducted in 1978.

Edgar Pomeroy. An early organizer of both teams and leagues in California. Pomeroy, who was born in England and came to the United States in 1888 at the age of 21, organized the Oakland Hornets, who later became the San Francisco Barbarians, in 1898. He founded the first San Francisco Bay area league in 1902 and served as commissioner of the Olympic Club and manager of the Barbarians. Elected honorary president of the Northern California Soccer Association in 1942. Inducted in 1955.

Arnold Ramsden. A longtime administrator of the sport in Texas. Ramsden was the Dallas and District commissioner of the National Amateur Cup for decades and was a Texas correspondent for various soccer publications around the country. Inducted in 1957.

Vernon Reese. A legendary teacher of the game in Baltimore. In 1938, after the end of his playing days, Reese opened a soccer clinic at Paterson Park in Baltimore that operated 52 Sundays a year for the next 44 years. Reese also started the Baltimore Catholic Youth Organization soccer league in 1958 and watched it grow from eight teams to 160 over the following 25 years. Inducted in 1957.

Gene Ringsdorf. The president of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1961 to 1963. Ringsdorf, who lived his entire life in and around Baltimore, was noted during his time as president and earlier for his promotion of legislation with the USSFA that significantly advanced the cause of soccer in American high schools. Also served as president of the Maryland state association and a member of the U.S. Olympic Committee. Inducted in 1979.

Elizabeth Robbie. The first female team owner in American professional soccer. Robbie and her husband, Joe, were the owners of the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Minnesota franchise in the North American Soccer League from the 1972 NASL season though the NASL’s final season in 1984. They then owned the same team, playing in the Major Indoor Soccer League, for an additional four seasons. Inducted in 2003.

Joe Robbie. A North American Soccer League team owner. Robbie and his wife, Elizabeth, owned the Miami franchise in the NASL from 1972 to 1984. Their team played from 1972 to 1976 as the Miami Toros, from 1977 to 1983 as the Fort Lauderdale Strikers and in 1984 as the Minnesota Strikers. Their teams reached the NASL championship games in 1974 and 1980 and made the NASL playoffs seven seasons in a row. Inducted in 2003.

Steve Ross. The chairman of the company that owned the New York Cosmos. Ross was one of 10 Kinney National executives who founded the Cosmos in 1970 and in 1971 sold the team to Kinney (which was renamed Warner Communications in 1972). Ross was chairman of the board of Warner, and while he did not own the team himself, he dominated it and gave the green light in 1974 for the effort to sign Pele, which led to the signings of other stars like Franz Beckenbauer and Giorgio Chinaglia. Inducted in 2003.

Alan Rothenberg. The president of the U.S. Soccer Federation from 1990 to 1998, a period of great growth for the sport in the United States. Rothenberg’s tenure was marked particularly by the 1994 World Cup, which the United States hosted with Rothenberg as the chairman of the organizing committee, and the start of Major League Soccer in 1996 with Rothenberg as chairman of the MLS board of directors. Rothenberg also has served as a vice president of CONCACAF and on various FIFA committees. Inducted in 2007.

Jack Rottenberg. Coach of the Newark Germans of New York’s German-American Soccer League from the 1930s to the 1960s. Under Rottenberg’s leadership, the Newark Germans won the German-American League title three times and the New Jersey state championship six times. Rottenberg, who was born in Hungary, was active in soccer for more than 70 years. Inducted in 1971.

Tom Sager. President of the U.S. Football Association from 1941 to 1945 and a leader of many Philadelphia soccer organizations. Served as president of the National Soccer League of Philadelphia from 1932 to 1939, president of the Eastern Pennsylvania state association from 1934 to 1941 and again from 1943 to 1973, and a director of the American Soccer League from 1935 to 1942. A longtime leader of the Philadelphia Old Timers Association and a leader in the move to establish a National Soccer Hall of Fame in 1950. Inducted in 1968.

Harry John Saunders. A leader in New York soccer at the club, league and state levels from the 1940s to the 1980s. Saunders, who was born in England and came to America in 1949, was president of the Southern New York state association from 1976 to 1978. He had earlier been president of Hota SC of New York’s German-American Soccer League and president of that league. Was involved with efforts that gained U.S. government support for U.S. Soccer’s successful bid to be named host of the 1994 World Cup. Inducted in 1981.

Manny Schellscheidt. An North American Soccer League and U.S. National Team coach. Schellscheidt was coach of the Hartford Bicentennials of the NASL in 1975 and 1976. In 1974, he coached the Rhode Island Oceaneers to the American Soccer League title and in 1973, was an assistant coach of the Philadelphia Atoms team that won the NASL championship. Coached the U.S. National Team for three games in 1975, as well as Olympic, Pan-American and national youth teams over the years. Inducted in 1990.

Emil Schillinger. A founder, manager and president of the Philadelphia Americans team of the American Soccer League. Schillinger, who took over as manager in 1938, when the team was still called the German-Americans, led the team to American Soccer League titles in 1942, 1944, 1947, 1948 and 1953. He had been business manager of the team when it won the ASL title in 1935 and the U.S. Open Cup in 1936. Schillinger was president of the ASL from 1942 to 1945. Inducted in 1960.

Elmer Schroeder. The first American-born president of the United States Football Association. Schroeder, who was president of the USFA in 1933 and 1934, was manager of the United States teams at the 1928 Olympic Games, the 1934 World Cup and the 1936 Olympic Games. He was manager of the Philadelphia German-Americans team from 1932 to 1937, including its American Soccer League title in 1935 and U.S. Open Cup victory in 1936. President of the ASL from 1939 to 1942. Inducted in 1951.

Erno Schwarz. The business manager of the American Soccer League from the 1930s to the 1960s and owner of the New York Americans ASL team for much of that time. Schwarz wielded tremendous influence over American soccer during those years, particularly because of his involvement in organizing dozens of games between American teams and touring foreign clubs. Schwarz, who had won two caps for his native Hungary, stayed in America after touring here with the Hakoah team from Vienna in 1926. Inducted in 1951.

Fred Shields. Defender who was one of the stars of the Kearny Scots team that won five consecutive American Soccer League championships between 1937 and 1941. Shields, who was born as Fred Zbikowski, played under that name for the United States in the 1936 Olympics. He was a high school and college referee for nearly three decades, handling some Open Cup games in 1948, after retiring as a player. Inducted in 1968.

Erwin Single. President of the United States Soccer Football Association from 1969 to 1971. Single had earlier been president of the German-American Soccer League of New York and vice president of the of the Southern New York state association. Single, who was born in Germany and came to America as a teenager in 1924, was the first editor of the American Soccer League News and a co-founder in 1941 of the Soccer News published for decades by fellow Hall of Famer Milt Miller. Inducted in 1981.

Alfred A. Smith. A legendary prep school coach in Pennsylvania. Smith, who was a member of early teams at Springfield College, became soccer coach at Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia in 1913 and coached that school’s team into the 1950s, as well as served as physical education director. Was editor of the NCAA Soccer Guide from 1948 to 1952. Inducted in 1951.

Patrick Smith. The director of officials of the American Soccer League from 1970 to 1977. Smith, who was born in England, also was a referee in the North American Soccer League. He was a charter member of the National Intercollegiate Soccer Officials Association, and editor of the first NISOA referee mechanical manual. First recipient of the Eddie Pearson Award, given to an outstanding American referee, in 1979. Inducted in 1998.

Reinhold Spath. A longtime referee and referee assessor in western New York. Spath, who was born in Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1959 at the age of 29, began refereeing in 1961 and eventually refereed in the North American Soccer League. In his 30 years as a referee, he refereed more than 5,000 games, and later assessed more than 1,000. Served as the state referee administrator for 1980 to 2002 and the state youth referee administrator from 1980 to 1999. Inducted in 1996.

Nicolaas Steelink. One of the founders of the California Soccer League and an official of that league for decades. Steelink, who was born in Holland and emigrated to the United States in 1912 at the age of 20, was a contributor over the years to various soccer publications and for a while was publisher of one, the Cosmopolitan Soccer News of Los Angeles. Inducted in 1971.

Hank Steinbrecher. General secretary of the United States Soccer Federation from 1990 to 2000. Steinbrecher was involved in organizing U.S. National Teams for a string of major events, including two men’s World Cups, three Women’s World Cups, two Copa Americas, five CONCACAF Gold Cups and three Olympic Games. He had earlier coached at several colleges and been director of the Boston soccer venue at the 1984 Olympic Games. Inducted in 2005.

Lee Stern. Owner of the Chicago Sting, who played in the North American Soccer League from 1975 to 1984 and the Major Indoor Soccer League from 1984 to 1988. Under Stern, the Sting won NASL championships in 1981 and 1984. He was chairman of the NASL executive committee in 1981 and 1982 and chairman of the MISL executive committee from 1986 to 1988. Inducted in 2003.

August Steur. An official of the German-American Soccer League of New York for decades. Steur, who was born in Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1923 at the age of 21, was involved with the German-American League in various capacities, including president, from 1924 until his death in 1969. Served as Honorary Commissioner of Public Events for the City of New York in the 1950s and ’60s and as an advisor on immigration matters to President Lyndon Johnson. Inducted in 1969.

Douglas Stewart. A college coach involved in the founding of the United States Football Association. Stewart, who was a soccer coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1910 to 1942, played an important role in the organizing of the USFA in 1913. Served from 1913 to 1926 as president of the Football Association of Pennsylvania, which he had helped to found in 1903. Editor for many years of the Spalding college soccer guide. Inducted in 1950.

Robert Stone. A longtime Colorado soccer official. Stone, who was born in England and emigrated to the United States in 1912 at the age of 20, served as secretary-treasurer of the Rocky Mountain Soccer Football Association from 1936 to 1941. He helped to reorganize that organization into the Colorado State Soccer Association in 1948 and served as its president until 1954 and its secretary from 1963 to 1968. Became president of the Colorado State Soccer League in 1968. Inducted in 1971.

Clive Toye. The New York Cosmos general manager credited with turning that league’s fortunes around when he signed Pele to a contract in 1975. Toye, who was born in England and came to the United States in 1967 at the age of 33, was president of three North American Soccer League teams, the Cosmos, Chicago Sting and Toronto Blizzard, and general manager of the Baltimore Bays. Was an official of the NASL in helping it through its crisis year of 1969 and in its final months in 1985, and helped to found the third American Soccer League in 1988. Inducted in 2003.

Joseph Triner. President of the United States Football Association from 1936 to 1938. Triner was a longtime Illinois soccer official who also served as president of the Sparta SC of Chicago and the Midwest League and chairman of the Illinois Soccer Commission. Presented the Triner Cup for annual competition between teams from Canada and the United States in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Inducted in 1952.

Jimmy Walder. A longtime Philadelphia referee who was considered the greatest American referee of the 1920s and ’30s. Walder, who was born in England and emigrated to the United States in 1905 at the age of 19, estimated that he refereed more than 3,000 college games and about 1,400 professional games during a career that lasted from 1909 to 1969. Referee of the U.S. Open Cup final in 1928 and 1937. Inducted in 1971.

Aldoph Washauer. Longtime California soccer official who was a leader in the financial affairs of the sport. Washauer, who was born in Germany and emigrated to the United States as a teenager in 1909, was treasurer of the California Soccer Football Association from 1961 to 1967 and had been a member of the finance committee of the United States Soccer Football Association. Inducted in 1977.

Thomas Webb. Referee who officiated in the American Soccer League and the North American Soccer League. Webb, who was born in England and emigrated to the United States in 1966 at the age of 30, served as president of the Washington state association, vice president of the U.S. Soccer Federation and chairman of the U.S. Soccer Federation’s National Referees Committee. Inducted in 1987.

Vic Weston. A longtime Washington soccer official. Weston was for many years the secretary of the Washington state association and a correspondent for soccer publications around the country about soccer activities in Washington. Inducted in 1956.

John Wood. The coach of the United States team at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki. Wood, who was born in England, was a referee in western Pennsylvania and Illinois until the late 1930s. He was a high school coach in the Chicago area for 26 years and served for many years as USSFA’s chairman of the National Junior Cup tournament. President of the Illinois Referees Association and a member for decades of the Illinois Soccer Commission. Inducted in 1953.

Phil Woosnam. Commissioner of the North American Soccer League from 1969 to 1983. Woosnam, who was born in Wales and came to the United States in 1967 at the age of 35, was the face of the league in its greatest growth years of the late 1970s. Ten years earlier, he had played a vital role in keeping the league alive through a 1969 season in which it declined to five teams. Coach of the U.S. National Team for nine games in 1968, including four World Cup qualifiers. Played 17 full internationals for Wales. Inducted in 1997.

Jerry Yeagley. Coach of the University of Indiana soccer team from 1963 to 2003, including six NCAA championships. Indiana was still a club team when Yeagley, a player on West Chester State’s 1961 NCAA champion team, became coach of it. The team was granted varsity status by the university in 1973, reached the NCAA title game for the first time in 1976 and won NCAA titles in 1982, 1983, 1988, 1998, 1999 and 2003. The last of those titles came in the final game of Yeagley’s coaching career. Inducted in 1989.

John Young. A longtime official at various levels of California soccer. Served the California Soccer Association in the 1920s and ’30s in positions that included district commissioner and member of the executive board. A correspondent on California soccer for the Spalding guides. Inducted in 1958.

Daniel Zampini. President of the West Penn Soccer Football Association from 1942 to 1952. Zampini, who had been an outstanding player in western Pennsylvania before turning to administration in that region, also served as president of the Keystone League of Western Pennsylvania in the 1930s. Was both chairman and vice chairman of the U.S. Football Association’s National Cup Committee. Inducted in 1963.

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