US SoccerUS Soccer

Player Bios

Jeff Agoos. Defender who played in the U.S. Men’s National Team for 15 years and won MLS championships in five of the league’s first eight seasons. Agoos played 134 games for the United States, including three games at the 2002 World Cup and 26 World Cup qualifiers. He also was a member of the United States teams at the 1998 World Cup, the 2000 Olympic Games and the 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup. Inducted in 2009.

Michelle Akers. Often called the greatest woman soccer player of all time, was a key member of the United States teams that won the Women’s World Cup in 1991 and 1999. She scored 10 goals in six games at the 1991 Women’s World Cup, including both American goals of the United States’ 2-1 victory over Norway in the final. In 1999, after having moved back from forward to a more defensive role, she anchored the American midfield throughout the tournament. Inducted in 2004.

Carlos Alberto Torres. One of the mainstays of the greatest New York Cosmos teams in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The Brazilian sweeper joined the Cosmos in the middle of the 1977 North American Soccer League season and helped to spark the late-season surge that carried them to the NASL championship. He won additional NASL titles with the Cosmos in 1978, 1980 and 1982. Before joining the Cosmos, he had played for more than a decade for major Brazilian clubs and was captain of the Brazil team that won the 1970 World Cup. Inducted in 2003.

Robert Annis. Midfielder who played for St. Louis teams that won two U.S. Open Cup titles and also was a member of the United States team at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. Annis was one of the stars of the Simpkins Ford teams that won the Open Cup in 1948 and 1950, beating Brookhattan of New York in 1948 and Ponta Delgada of Fall River in 1950. In addition to the 1950 World Cup, he also was a member of the U.S. team at the 1948 Olympics Games. Inducted in 1976.

Desmond Armstrong. Defender who played for the United States in the 1988 Olympic Games and the 1990 World Cup. Armstrong played 81 full internationals for the United States between 1987 and 1994, including four games in the United States' landmark victory in the 1991 CONCACAF Gold Cup. Played three seasons in the Major Indoor Soccer League and three seasons in the American Professional Soccer League and the leagues that preceded it.

Andrew Auld. A regular in the United States team at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay, playing every minute of all three U.S. games. The Scottish-born midfielder was one of the stars of the original American Soccer League of the 1920s, playing for Providence from 1924 to 1930 and for several other ASL clubs in later years. He played a total of 315 ASL games. Inducted in 1986.

Adolph Bachmeier. A longtime Chicago-area star who captained the U.S. Men’s National Team in the late 1960s. Bachmeier, a defender and midfielder, played a total of 22 games for the United States, including nine World Cup qualifiers. He was captain of the team for the six qualifiers played in 1968 and 1969. Bachmeier played most of his club soccer for the Chicago Kickers of the National Soccer League of Chicago and was a star of the Chicago Mustangs in the first season of the NASL. Inducted in 2002.

Walter Bahr. A midfielder who starred in the U.S. Men’s National Team and led the Philadelphia Nationals to a string of American Soccer League titles. Bahr made the shot that was deflected into the net by Joe Gaetjens for the goal that beat England in the 1950 World Cup. He played 10 full internationals for the United States, which also included World Cup qualifiers in 1949, 1954 and 1957, and captained the U.S. team at the 1948 Olympics. His 13 seasons in the ASL included championships in 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1955 and 1956. Inducted in 1976.

Marcelo Balboa. Defender who played for the United States in the 1990, 1994 and 1998 World Cups. Balboa finished his national team career with 128 caps between 1988 and 2000, and was named the U.S. Soccer Male Athlete of the Year in 1992 and 1994. He played every minute of all four U.S. games at the 1994 World Cup and was most famed for his near-miss bicycle kick against Colombia. Balboa played the first seven Major League Soccer seasons, six of them with the Colorado Rapids. Inducted in 2005.

George Barr. Defender who played in the American Soccer League for Brookhattan and Brooklyn Hispano from 1935 to 1950. He was captain of Brookhattan for many years before being traded to Hispano in 1950. The peak of his career coincided with an era when the United States played no full internationals for 10 years because of World War II, but he did play for ASL selections against touring foreign teams a number of times. Inducted in 1983.

Fred Beardsworth. Halfback who played for the New Bedford Whalers and Fall River Rovers of the Southern New England Soccer League and Robins Dry Dock of the National Association Foot Ball League after emigrating from England in 1914. He played for the Robins team that won both the U.S. Open Cup and the American Football Association Cup in 1921 and also reached the 1918 U.S. Open Cup final with Fall River. Inducted in 1965.

Franz Beckenbauer. Sweeper and midfielder who starred for the New York Cosmos in the 1970s and ’80s after European career that had seen him play in three World Cups for West Germany and captain West Germany to both the 1972 European title and the 1974 World Cup title. Beckenbauer was one of the leaders of the Cosmos team that won NASL titles in 1977, 1978 and 1980 and was chosen as a first-team NASL all-star in 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980 and 1983. Inducted in 1998.

Ray Bernabei. Defender who was captain of the Harmarville (Pa.) Hurricanes team that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1952 and 1956. Bernabei also led the Harmarville teams that reached the U.S. Open Cup final in 1953 and the National Amateur Cup final in 1950 and 1951. He was named to West Penn League all-star teams every season from 1949 to 1960 and played in 10 West Penn finals. Inducted in 1978.

Vladislav “Bogie” Bogicevic. Midfielder who starred for the New York Cosmos and ranked among the best at his position in North American Soccer League history. He won NASL championships with the Cosmos in 1978, 1980 and 1982 and was chosen as a first-team NASL all-star five times in his seven NASL seasons. Prior to joining the Cosmos in 1978, he had played 13 seasons for Red Star Belgrade in Yugoslavia, winning five first-division titles, and was among Yugoslavia’s stars at the 1974 World Cup. Inducted in 2002.

Michael “Mike” Bookie. Forward for several top Cleveland teams who was a member of the United States squad at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Before moving to Cleveland in 1926, he had played two seasons in the American Soccer League, for Boston and New Bedford. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, he played primarily for Slavia and Magyar, the two top teams in the Cleveland league. Inducted in 1986.

Frank Borghi. Goalkeeper who is often considered the top contributor to the United States’ 1-0 upset of England in the 1950 World Cup. That game was one of nine full internationals he played for the United States between 1949 and 1954, games that included three in the World Cup and five more in World Cup qualifying. Borghi won numerous honors with several club teams in St. Louis, including winning U.S. Open Cup titles in 1948 and 1950 with Simpkins. Inducted in 1976.

John “Frenchy” Boulos. Forward who played for a number of leading New York teams in the 1940s and ’50s. Boulos, who was born in Haiti, joined Brooklyn Hispano of the American Soccer League in 1940 and played for the team through 1949, although he was in the army for several of those seasons. He then played four more ASL seasons for Hakoah before finishing his career with Lithuanian Sport of the German-American League, where he won a league title in 1954. Inducted in 1980.

Harold Brittan. Forward who won four American Soccer League titles and two U.S. Open Cup championships in the 1920s. Brittan, who had an early spell with Chelsea in his native England, captured his first ASL title in 1922 with Philadelphia FC, the transplanted Bethlehem Steel team, and also was the ASL’s league scorer that season with 27 goals. Later that year, he signed with the Fall River Marksmen and won ASL titles with Fall River in 1924, 1925 and 1926, and U.S. Open Cup victories in 1924 and 1927. Inducted in 1951.

David “Davey” Brown. Forward who was one of the greatest goalscorers of the original American Soccer League. Brown, who lived his entire life in Kearny, N.J., scored 189 goals during his 11 ASL seasons. His best was the 1926-27 season, when he scored 21 goals in October and finished the season with 52 goals in 38 games, the highest season total in the league’s history. Brown played for four ASL teams, primarily the New York Giants, and also scored three goals in his three U.S. National Team games. Inducted in 1951.

George Brown. Forward who played in both the American Soccer League and the German-American Soccer League before his career was slowed by a knee injury suffered in his early 20s. He won GASL titles in three consecutive seasons with the German-Hungarians of Brooklyn and then played several seasons for Elizabeth Polish Falcons of the ASL, winning the league scoring title in 1957. He was a member of the United States squad that won a bronze medal at the 1959 Pan-American Games. Inducted in 1995.

James “Jim” Brown. Forward who starred in the United States team at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Brown, who was playing for the New York Giants of the American Soccer League at the time, played all three games for the United States at that World Cup and scored the only goal of the United States’ semifinal defeat against Argentina. Brown, who was born in Scotland and was the father of fellow Hall of Famer George Brown, later played several seasons for Tottenham and Brentford in England. Inducted in 1986.

Paul Caligiuri. Defender and midfielder who scored the winning goal of the United States’ landmark victory over Trinidad in a World Cup qualifier in 1989. The 110 full internationals that Caligiuri played for the U.S. included two World Cups, and he was a key player in the USA’s successes at the 1991 CONCACAF Gold Cup and the 1995 Copa America. Caligiuri, one of the first Americans to play professionally in Europe, spent five seasons in Germany before ending his career with six seasons in MLS. Inducted in 2004.

Joseph S. Carenza. Midfielder who was a member of the St. Louis Kutis team that won both the U.S. Open Cup and the National Amateur Cup in 1957. Carenza, who also played for other St. Louis clubs that included Steamfitters, Zenthoefer and Simpkins, was selected to numerous St. Louis all-star teams over the years. After retiring as a player, he became executive sports director of the Catholic Youth Council, a significant organization in St. Louis soccer. Inducted in 1982.

Ralph Carrafi. Midfielder who played for assorted clubs in Western Pennsylvania, New England and Ohio during his career. Carrafi played in the 1930 U.S. Open Cup final for Bruell Insurance of Cleveland, a club he starred in from 1926, when it was called Cleveland Magyar, until 1934. He had earlier played for Vestaburg near Pittsburgh and for Fall River Rovers and Fall River United from 1919 to 1922. Inducted in 1959.

Efrain “Chico” Chacurian. Forward who played in both the American Soccer League and the German-American Soccer League, including eight seasons with New York Swiss of the GASL. Chacurian, who emigrated to the United States from Argentina in 1947, played four games in the U.S. Men’s National Team, including three World Cup qualifiers against Mexico and Haiti in 1954. Inducted in 1992.

Stanley Chesney. Goalkeeper who played 17 seasons in the American Soccer League for the New York Americans. He won an ASL championship with the Americans in 1936 and the U.S. Open Cup in 1937. Although he never played for the full U.S. National Team, he gained the nickname “The International Man” for his frequent appearance for ASL selections against foreign teams, including three games against the touring Scottish all-stars in 1935 and 1939. Inducted in 1966.

Paul Child. Forward who played 10 seasons in the North American Soccer League and was among the league’s leading scorers. Child played 245 games for five different NASL teams. Six of those seasons were with the San Jose Earthquakes, for whom he played 149 games. Child’s 102 NASL goals ranked him fifth all-time in the NASL. He was chosen as a first-team NASL all-star in 1974, a season when he led the league with 15 goals. Inducted in 2003.

Giorgio Chinaglia. Forward who was the leading goalscorer in the history of the North American Soccer League, with 262 goals in his eight seasons for the New York Cosmos. Chinaglia was the NASL’s leading goalscorer five seasons in a row, topped by his 50 goals in the 1980 season, and was chosen as the NASL’s most valuable player in 1981. He won NASL titles with the Cosmos in 1977, 1978, 1980 and 1982 and was a first-time all-star in six of his eight NASL seasons. Inducted in 2000.

Fernando Clavijo. Defender who played a key role for the United States in the 1994 World Cup. Clavijo, who emigrated from Uruguay in 1979, played in the American Soccer League, the North American Soccer League and the Major Indoor Soccer League before making his debut in the U.S. Men’s National Team in 1990 at the age of 33, three years after becoming an American citizen. He eventually won 61 caps for the United States, including three games at the 1994 World Cup. Inducted in 2005.

Charles Colombo. Midfielder who was one of the leading members of the United States team in the 1950 World Cup. Colombo, who was known for always wearing gloves when he played, regardless of the weather, also won U.S. Open Cup titles in 1949 and 1950 with Simpkins of St. Louis. He played 10 full internationals for the United States, including three at the 1950 World Cup and four in World Cup qualifying, and represented the United States in the 1948 and 1952 Olympic Games. Inducted in 1976.

Geoff Coombes. Forward who played for teams in Detroit and Chicago from the 1930s through the 1950s and was a member of the United States squad at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. Coombes, who was born in England, was a member of the Chicago Vikings team that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1946. That same year, he played the first of his two seasons for Detroit in the North American Soccer Football League. Inducted in 1976.

Robert W. Craddock. Forward who was a member of the United States squad at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. Craddock played most of his career for Pittsburgh clubs Castle Shannon and Harmarville, and he won U.S. Open Cup titles in 1952 and 1956 with Harmarville. Although he didn’t get into a game in the 1950 World Cup, he later played for the United States in a World Cup qualifier against Haiti in 1952. Inducted in 1997.

Paul “Duts” Danilo. Forward who played for a series of outstanding Pittsburgh teams from the 1930s through the 1950s. Danilo was a member of the Pittsburgh Indians team that won the North American Soccer Football League title in 1947 and also had played for the same team in 1946. Earlier, he had played a number of seasons for Morgan and Heidelberg in Pittsburgh-area leagues, and scored the winning goal for Morgan in the 1940 National Amateur Cup final. Inducted in 1997.

Rick Davis. Midfielder who was captain of the U.S. Men’s National Team for much of the 1980s and was one of the few Americans in the New York Cosmos’ galaxy of international stars. Davis played 36 full internationals for the United States, including World Cup qualifiers in 1980, 1984, 1985 and 1988, and he also represented the United States in the 1984 and 1988 Olympic Games. He played seven seasons for the Cosmos, and was a member of the Cosmos NASL champion teams in 1978, 1980 and 1982. Inducted in 2001.

Walter Dick. Forward who played for the United States in the 1934 World Cup. Dick played only one full international for the United States, but he also played for the ASL selection that faced a Scottish all-star team in 1935. He started his career with the Providence and Fall River teams of the original ASL. He later was a member of the Pawtucket Rangers teams that reached the U.S. Open Cup final in 1934, 1935 and 1941 and the Kearny Scots teams that won ASL titles in 1937 and 1938. Inducted in 1989.

Nick DiOrio. Forward who played for a string of champion teams in the Pittsburgh area and was a member of the United States squad at the 1950 World Cup. DiOrio starred in the Morgan-Strasser team that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1949 and the Harmarville team that won it in 1952. His teams won titles in the Keystone League of Western Pennsylvania five times, and he played in the North American Soccer Football League in 1946 and 1947 for Pittsburgh and Chicago. Inducted in 1974.

Aldo “Buff” Donelli. Forward who was the surprise star of the United States team at the 1934 World Cup in Italy. The four goals that he scored in a World Cup qualifier against Mexico in 1934 still share the record as the most ever in the U.S. Men’s National Team. Donelli had led the Pittsburgh league in scoring every season from 1922 to 1928 and then played for Heidelberg and Curry in the early 1930s. He briefly came out of retirement to play for Morgan in the 1944 U.S. Open Cup final. Inducted in 1954.

Thomas Dooley. Defender and midfielder who played in two World Cups for the United States and was captain of the U.S. team at the 1998 World Cup. Dooley, who was the son of an American serviceman and had lived his entire life in Germany, did not play the first of his 81 games for the United States until the age of 31. He had played 11 pro seasons in Germany and ended his career with four seasons in MLS, three with Columbus and one with the MetroStars. Inducted in 2010.

James E. “Jimmy” Douglas. Goalkeeper who played for the United States in both the 1924 Olympic Games and the 1930 World Cup. Douglas also played nine seasons in the original American Soccer League, for eight different teams. He played nine full internationals for the United States between 1924 and 1930, including both of the U.S. games at the 1924 Olympics in Paris and all three of the U.S. games at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Inducted in 1953.

Thomas Duggan. Forward who played eight seasons in the original American Soccer League of the 1920s for five different clubs. The English-born star scored 54 goals in 172 ASL games, with his best season being 1923-24, when he scored 14 goals in 27 games for the New York Football Club. He was a member of the Paterson FC team that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1923, and he scored one of the Paterson goals against Scullin Steel in the final. Inducted in 1955.

James “Jimmy” Dunn. Forward who was the star of the Ben Millers team that in 1920 became the first St. Louis team to win the U.S. Open Cup. Dunn joined Ben Millers in 1916 and, except for the two years he spent in the navy in World War I, played for them until 1927. In addition to the 1920 U.S. Open Cup, in which he scored the winning goal, he was a member of the team that was runner-up in the 1926 U.S. Open Cup, although he didn’t play in the final. Inducted in 1974.

Alexandre Ely. Midfielder who starred for the Philadelphia Ukrainian Nationals from 1959 to 1965 through most of their reign as the top team in American soccer. He was a member of the Uke Nats teams that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1960 and 1963 and the American Soccer League championship in 1961, 1962, 1963 and 1964. Ely played three full internationals for the United States, a World Cup qualifier against Mexico in 1960 and two more qualifiers, both against Mexico, in 1965. Inducted in 1997.

Joy Fawcett. Defender who played for the United States in four Women’s World Cups, winning two of those, and three Olympic Games, winning two. Fawcett played in the U.S. Women’s National Team from 1987 to 2004, accumulating a total of 239 caps. She started 39 of the 40 games that the United States played in her four World Cups and three Olympics. She also played three seasons in the Women’s United Soccer Association, and was a Women’s United Soccer Association all-star in 2003. Inducted in 2009.

John “Jock” Ferguson. Defender who starred for the greatest Bethlehem Steel teams prior to 1920, winning the U.S. Open cup four times with Bethlehem Steel, and the American Football Association Cup five times. With the exception of one season, Ferguson played for Bethlehem Steel from 1914 to 1928. He won American Soccer League championships in 1922 and 1927 with Bethlehem Steel (which played as Philadelphia FC in 1922) and 1923 with J&P Coats of Pawtucket. Inducted in 1950.

Thomas “Whitey” Fleming. Forward for Bethlehem Steel in its glory years of 1915-1919. Fleming was a mainstay of the Bethlehem Steel team throughout its string of U.S. Open Cup, AFA Cup and league championships. In addition to his four U.S. Open Cup titles and five AFA Cup titles, Fleming played for three ASL champion teams, Bethlehem Steel in 1922, J&P Coats in 1923 and Boston Wonder Workers in 1928. Inducted in 2005.

Thomas Florie. Forward who was captain of the United States team at the first World Cup in 1930. Florie played 10 seasons in the American Soccer League for Harrison, Providence, Fall River and New Bedford, scoring 126 goals in his 317 ASL games. He played eight full internationals for the United States, including all four United States games at the 1930 and 1934 World Cups. After the end of the original ASL, he won two U.S. Open Cup titles, for New Bedford in 1932 and Pawtucket in 1941. Inducted in 1986.

Julie Foudy. Midfielder who played 272 full internationals for the United States in a Women’s National Team career that lasted from 1988 to 2004. Foudy played in all 40 of the United States’ games in the 1991, 1995, 1999 and 2003 Women’s World Cup and the 1996, 2000 and 2004 Olympic Games, winning two World Cups and two Olympic titles. She was captain of the U.S. team at the 2000 and 2004 Olympics and the 2003 World Cup. Inducted in 2007.

Werner Fricker. The U.S. Soccer Federation president who headed the effort that won for the United States the right to host the 1994 World Cup. Fricker was president of the U.S. Soccer Federation from 1984 to 1990 and played a great role in improving the U.S. Soccer Federation’s financial situation, but is best known for the successful World Cup bid. It also was on Fricker’s watch, in 1989, that the United States qualified for the World Cup for the first time in 40 years. Had earlier been an outstanding amateur player and captain of the United German-Hungarians from 1958 to 1969, including the National Amateur Cup winning team of 1965. Inducted in 1992.

William J. Fryer. Midfielder who played in the Fall River Marksmen’s powerful teams of the 1920s. Fryer, who emigrated from England in 1921, played for Fall River for only four of his 10 American Soccer League seasons, from 1924 to 1927, but he won three ASL titles and two U.S. Open Cups in those four seasons. He also played for Todd Shipyards, Paterson, New York Giants, Brooklyn Wanderers and Newark Skeeters during his ASL career. Inducted in 1952.

Carin (Jennings) Gabarra. Forward who was part of the United States’ “Triple-Edged Sword” of attackers in its victory at the 1991 Women’s World Cup. Jennings scored six goals in six games in that World Cup. She finished her national team career five years later with 53 goals in 117 games. In addition to that World Cup, she also played for the United States in the 1995 Women’s World Cup and the 1996 Olympic Games, winning a gold medal in the latter. Inducted in 2000.

Joseph “Joe” Gaetjens. Forward who scored the goal that gave the United States its 1-0 upset win against England in the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. That goal was the only one Gaetjens ever scored for the U.S. National Team, but he led the American Soccer League with 18 goals for Brookhattan in the 1949-50 ASL season. Gaetjens, who was born in Haiti, returned to Haiti in 1953 and disappeared there in 1964, apparently a victim of the secret police. Inducted in 1976.

James “Jimmy” Gallagher. Midfielder who was one of the stars of the United States team at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Gallagher, who also played for the United States in the 1934 World Cup, had emigrated from Scotland in 1913 at the age of 12. Gallager played 12 seasons in the original American Soccer League, appearing in 349 games in that league and winning ASL titles with J&P Coats in 1923 and New York Giants in 1932. He scored a key goal in New York’s dramatic second leg comeback in the 1932 final. Inducted in 1986.

Gino Gard. Goalkeeper who was a member of the United States squad at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. Gard, who was born in Italy and whose name was Gardassanich before he moved to the United States, played from 1949 to 1959 for Slovak of the National Soccer League of Chicago. He reached the National Amateur Cup final in 1953 with Slovak. Inducted in 1976.

James “Jim” Gentle. Forward who was a member of the United States squad at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Gentle played for the Boston Wonder Workers in the 1925-26 American Soccer League season, and was playing for Philadelphia Field Club at the time of his selection to the World Cup squad in 1930. Later won a bronze medal in field hockey at the 1932 Olympic Games. Inducted in 1986.

Rudy Getzinger. Midfielder who played for Chicago clubs in both the National Soccer League of Chicago and the North American Soccer League. Getzinger played eight full internationals for the United States, including three World Cup qualifiers in 1972. He played in two Olympic qualifiers in 1964 and 1967 and won a National Amateur Cup with Schwaben of Chicago in 1964. Inducted in 1991.

Edward “Teddy” Glover. Defender who starred in both the original American Soccer League and the re-formed version in the 1930s. After emigrating from England in 1928, Glover was a member of the New York Giants team that won the 1931 ASL championship and the New York Americans team that reached the U.S. Open Cup final in 1933. He finished his ASL career with six seasons for Brookhattan beginning in 1934. Inducted in 1965.

Adelino “Billy” Gonsalves. Forward and midfielder who was one of the most storied players in American soccer history, starring in two World Cups and winning the U.S. Open Cup eight times. Gonsalves played in the American Soccer League, the St. Louis Soccer League and the National Soccer League of Chicago during a career that lasted from 1927 to 1947. He won the cup three times with the Fall River Marksmen, twice with Stix, Baer & Fuller of St. Louis, once with Central Breweries of St. Louis and twice with Brooklyn Hispano. Inducted in 1950.

Robert “Bob” Gormley. Forward who played 17 seasons for the Philadelphia Americans of the American Soccer League, serving as captain of the team in 12 of those seasons. Gormley played for the Americans from 1937 to 1954 and won ASL titles in 1942, 1944, 1947, 1948 and 1952. Played one full international for the United States, a World Cup qualifier against Haiti in 1954. Inducted in 1989.

Sheldon “Ben” Govier. Midfielder who played for a string of Chicago and St. Louis teams in the early years of the 20th century. Govier spent his longest stretch with Pullman A.C. of Chicago, but he also played for Wanderers, Woodlawn and Buxton Red Sox in Chicago and Cycling Club in St. Louis. Govier, who had emigrated from Scotland at the age of 8 in 1891, was a member of the Chicago all-star team that upset the touring English Pilgrims in 1905. Inducted in 1950.

Karl-Heinz Granitza. Forward who was the No. 3 all-time goalscorer in the North American Soccer League, with 141 goals in his 225 games for the Chicago Sting. Granitza was unusual among the NASL’s biggest names in that he had not been a major star in his native country, West Germany, before starting his seven-season NASL career in 1978. Granitza, who scored seven goals in 10 games during the 1981 NASL playoffs, won NASL titles with the Sting in 1981 and 1984. Inducted in 2003.

Joseph Gryzik. Forward who played for the Polish-American Eagles of the National Soccer League of Chicago from 1949, when he emigrated from Poland, until he retired in 1965. Gryzik captained the Eagles teams that won the Illinois state cup in 1950, 1954, 1955, 1957 and 1963 and reached the National Amateur Cup final in 1955. Played for Chicago and NSL all-star selections in a number of games against touring European and Latin America clubs. Inducted in 1973.

Mia Hamm. Forward who was the greatest goalscorer in women’s international soccer history, with 158 goals in the 275 games she played for the U.S. Women’s National Team between 1987 and 2004. Hamm played in four World Cup and three Olympic Games, winning World Cup titles in 1991 and 1999 and Olympic gold medals in 1996 and 2004. She was a Women’s United Soccer Association champion with Washington in 2003, the FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year in 2001 and 2002 and the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year five times. Inducted in 2007.

Albert Harker. Defender who starred for the Philadelphia Americans team that won a string of national honors in the 1930s and ’40s. Harker, who was a member of the United States team at the 1934 World Cup in Italy, played for the Americans, who originally were named the German-Americans, from 1932 to 1948, winning American Soccer League titles in 1935, 1942, 1944 and 1947, the U.S. Open Cup in 1936 and the National Amateur Cup in 1933 and 1934. Inducted in 1979.

John Harkes. Midfielder who played in the 1990 and 1994 World Cups and was one of the stars of the D.C. United team that won MLS championships in three of that league’s first four seasons. Harkes played 90 full internationals for the United States and was chosen as co-MVP of the 1995 Copa America in Uruguay. He was among the first Americans to succeed at a high level in Europe, playing for Sheffield Wednesday in the first division in England in the early 1990s. Inducted in 2005.

April Heinrichs. Forward who was captain of the United States team that won the first Women’s World Cup in 1991. Heinrichs, who later was coach of the U.S. Women’s National Team for five years, played 47 full internationals for the United States between 1986 and 1991, scoring 37 goals. Four of those goals came in the 1991 Women’s World Cup and another eight in the four qualifiers she played that year. She was chosen as the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year in 1986 and 1989. Inducted in 1998.

Shannon Higgins-Cirovski. Midfielder who was the creative schemer of the U.S. team that won the Women’s World Cup in 1991. Higgins played 51 full internationals for the United States between 1987 and 1991, and was one of the stars of the 1991 team despite the fact that she was still recovering from a broken foot during that World Cup. Her free kick set up the opening goal of the United States’ win over Norway in the final. Inducted in 2002.

John “Jack” Hynes. Forward who played in the top levels of American soccer from 1938 to 1960. Hynes played the largest part of his professional career, 12 seasons, for New York Americans of the American Soccer League, but he won his greatest honors with other clubs, taking ASL titles with Hakoah of New York in 1957 and Colombo of New York in 1960, and a U.S. Open Cup with St. Mary’s Celtic of Brooklyn in 1939. He played four full internationals for the United States, all World Cup qualifiers in 1949. Inducted in 1977.

John Jaap. Forward who was a mainstay of the Bethlehem Steel team in the 1920s. Jaap, who was born in Scotland and grew up near Pittsburgh, played for several outstanding Pittsburgh-area teams before joining Bethlehem Steel in 1921. He won American Soccer League championships with the Steelworkers in 1922 and 1927 and a U.S. Open Cup in 1926, when he scored one of Bethlehem’s goals in the final against Ben Millers of St. Louis. Inducted in 1953.

Cobi Jones. Midfielder who played a record 164 games for the U.S. Men’s National Team between 1992 and 2004. Jones’ caps included 11 games at the 1994, 1998 and 2002 World Cups and 30 World Cup qualifiers in other years. Jones played for the LA Galaxy in MLS from 1996 to 2007, appearing in 351 MLS games, winning MLS titles in 2002 and 2005 and U.S. Open Cups in 2001 and 2005. Inducted in 2011.

Harry Keough. Defender who was one of the stars of the U.S. Men’s National Team in the 1940s and ’50s and of the Kutis powerhouse from St. Louis. Keough’s 19 games for the United States were highlighted by the 1-0 victory over England in the 1950 World Cup, a game in which he was the star of the American backline. Keough, the captain of the Kutis team that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1957 and the National Amateur Cup six times in a row between 1956 and 1961, played in the 1952 and 1956 Olympics. Inducted in 1976.

Nicholas Kropfelder. Forward who was one of the stars of the Philadelphia Nationals teams that won the American Soccer League title three times in four years between 1949 and 1952. Kropfelder had won an ASL title in 1946 with Baltimore Americans and then was one of several players who moved to Philadelphia after the Baltimore team folded in 1948. In addition to his ASL titles, he won the Lewis Cup with Philadelphia Nationals three times and reached the U.S. Open Cup final in 1949 and 1952. Inducted in 1996.

Rudolph “Rudy” Kuntner. Forward who played in the Olympics and won a U.S. Open Cup title 17 years apart. Kuntner, who was born in Austria and grew up in New York, was the star of the U.S. team at the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam. He then played for New York clubs in the American Soccer League for years and was a mainstay in the Brookhattan team that won the ASL-U.S. Open Cup-Lewis Cup triple in 1945. Inducted in 1963.

Alexi Lalas. Defender whose on-field success and red-bearded appearance made him the most recognizable face of American soccer in the 1990s. Lalas played for the United States in events that included the 1992 Olympics, the 1993 CONCACAF Gold Cup, the 1994 World Cup, the 1995 Copa America and the 1996 Olympics. He played two seasons for Padova in the Italian first division before returning home to finish his career with seven Major League Soccer seasons, winning an MLS title in 2002 with the LA Galaxy. Inducted in 2006.

Millard Lang. Forward who played for leading teams in the American Soccer League, the Cleveland League and the National Soccer League of Chicago. Lang began his pro career with Canton of Baltimore in 1934 and finished it with Baltimore Americans in 1945. In between, he played one season in Cleveland and five in Chicago, winning a U.S. Open Cup title in 1938 with Sparta of Chicago. Led the ASL with 18 goals for Canton in the 1934-35 season. Inducted in 1950.

Bob Lenarduzzi. Defender and midfielder who played 11 seasons in the North American Soccer League, all of them for the Vancouver Whitecaps, and was the NASL leader in all-time appearances with 312. Lenarduzzi, who played 47 full internationals for Canada, including playing in the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, won one NASL championship, in 1979. He was coach of the Canadian national team from 1992 to 1997. Inducted in 2003.

William “Bill” Looby. Forward who was the goalscoring star of the Kutis powerhouse in the 1950s and a key member of the U.S. National Team. Looby played eight full internationals for the United States between 1954 and 1959, but his greatest exploits were at the amateur level. He scored six goals in six games at the 1959 Pan-American Games and played for Kutis in the six consecutive National Amateur Cups that it won between 1956 and 1961. Inducted in 2001.

Jospeh Maca. Defender who played in the U.S. team that upset England in the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. Maca, who had emigrated from Belgium a few years before, played for Brooklyn Hispano in the American Soccer League in the late 1940s and early 1950s. He represented the ASL in games against touring European teams several times and was chosen as the ASL’s most valuable player in the 1949-50 season. Inducted in 1976.

Arnie Mausser. Goalkeeper who played 10 seasons in the North American Soccer League and was the first-choice ’keeper for the U.S. Men’s National Team through most of the NASL era. Mausser played 35 full internationals for the United States between 1975 and 1985, including 11 World Cup qualifiers. He played for seven different NASL teams and was the only American chosen as a first-team NASL all-star in that league’s last nine seasons. Inducted in 2003.

Pat McBride. Midfielder who played nine seasons in the North American Soccer League and captained the U.S. Men’s National Team in World Cup qualifying. McBride played five full internationals for the United States, three of which were World Cup qualifiers in 1972. He was the first American-born player to sign with the NASL and played his entire NASL career for the St. Louis Stars, appearing in 175 games. Inducted in 1994.

Bart McGhee. Forward who played for the United States in the 1930 World Cup and scored the first goal of the United States’ opening game in that inaugural World Cup. McGhee, who was born in Scotland and came to America as a child, played 10 seasons in the American Soccer League, appearing in 352 games and scoring 138 goals. He won a U.S. Open Cup in 1928 with New York Nationals and scored one of the goals of the New York Giants’ dramatic comeback in the 1932 ASL final. Inducted in 1986.

John “Jack” McGuire. Forward who played five seasons in the original American Soccer League of the 1920s and won two U.S. Open Cup titles. McGuire got his Open Cup victories with Robins Dry Dock in 1921 and Paterson FC in 1923. In his ASL career, he appeared in 108 games for Todd Shipyards, Paterson, New York FC, New Bedford Whalers and Brooklyn Wanderers. He played one full international for the United States, against Canada in 1925. Inducted in 1951.

Edward “Ed” McIlvenny. Midfielder who captained the United States in its upset win against England at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil. McIlvenny had emigrated from Scotland in 1949. He won an American Soccer League championship with Philadelphia Nationals in 1950 but after the World Cup, signed with Manchester United and played in England and Ireland through most of the 1950s. Played in all three of the United States’ games at the 1950 World Cup. Inducted in 1976.

Bernard “Benny” McLaughlin. Forward who starred in the U.S. Men’s National Team for several years but missed the 1950 World Cup because of work commitments. McLaughlin played in the American Soccer League from 1945 to 1961, primarily with the Philadelphia Nationals, where he won ASL titles in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953. Played for the United States in World Cup qualifiers in 1949 and 1954, in the game against Scotland in 1952 that drew a crowd of 107,765 and in the 1948 Olympic Games. Inducted in 1977.

Alex McNab. Forward who played for several famous teams in Fall River and St. Louis in the 1920s and ’30s, winning six U.S. Open Cups in a row from 1930 to 1935. McNab had played 190 games in the Scottish first division and was a regular in the Scottish national team before moving to America in 1924. He played in the ASL for Boston, Fall River and New Bedford from 1924 to 1932 and the St. Louis league for Stix, Baer & Fuller, Central Breweries and Shamrocks from 1932 to 1936, winning seven league titles. Inducted in 2005.

Tony Meola. Goalkeeper who was captain of the United States team in the 1994 World Cup. Meola played 100 full internationals for the United States between 1988 and 2000, including seven games at the 1990 and 1994 World Cups and five World Cup qualifiers in 1989 and 2000. Meola played 11 seasons in MLS, winning both a league title and the MLS most valuable player award with the Kansas City Wizards in 2000. Inducted in 2012.

Werner Mieth. Midfielder who played in the ASL from 1933 to 1962 and won five league championships with the Philadelphia Americans in the 1940s and ’50s. Mieth, who emigrated from Germany in 1925, moved into the ASL when the Newark Germans team he was playing for joined the league in 1933. He eventually also played for Kearny Irish, Trenton Highlanders, Paterson Dovers, Philadelphia Americans and Elizabeth Falcons, winning titles with Philadelphia in 1942, 1944, 1947, 1948 and 1952. Inducted in 1974.

Robert “Bob” Millar. Forward who won the U.S. Open Cup four times and later coached the U.S. team in the inaugural World Cup in 1930. Millar, who played for nine different teams during his pro playing career, won U.S. Open Cup titles with Brooklyn Field Club in 1914, Bethlehem Steel in 1915 and 1919, and New York Nationals in 1928. In Bethlehem’s 1914-15 season, he scored a team record 59 goals in 34 games. Inducted in 1950.

Lloyd Monsen. Forward who was captain of the New York Americans team that won the American Soccer League-U.S. Open Cup double in 1954. Monsen played nine seasons in the ASL, all of them for New York Americans and the team that it merged with, Hakoah, with whom he won ASL titles in 1957, 1958 and 1959. Played five full internationals for the United States between 1952 and 1957, including one in front of a crowd of 107,765 in Scotland. Inducted in 1994.

Johnny Moore. Forward who played 11 full internationals for the United States, including four World Cup qualifiers in 1972. Moore, who had emigrated from Scotland years before, played five seasons in the North American Soccer League between 1974 and 1978, four for the San Jose Earthquakes and one for the Oakland Stompers. Later was general manager of the San Jose Earthquakes of Major League Soccer. Inducted in 1997.

George Moorhouse. Defender and midfielder who played for the United States in both the 1930 and 1934 World Cups, serving as captain in 1934, and had a long career in both the original and second American Soccer League. Moorhouse played seven full internationals for the United States between 1926 and 1934 and played 13 seasons in the American Soccer League. He won his only U.S. Open Cup title in his final pro season, with the New York Americans in 1937. Inducted in 1986.

Robert Morrison. Midfielder who was one of the early stars of the Bethlehem Steel team. Morrison, who emigrated from Scotland in 1910, played for Bethlehem from 1913 to 1918, during the years when it was rising from local to national prominence. He was a member of the Bethlehem teams that won U.S. Open Cup titles in 1915 and 1916 and American Football Association Cup titles in 1914, 1916 and 1917. Inducted in 1951.

Ed Murphy. Forward who was one of the leading stars of the U.S. Men’s National Team in the 1950s and ’60s. Murphy, who was born in Scotland, played 18 full internationals for the United States between 1955 and 1969, including 13 World Cup qualifiers in 1957, 1960, 1965 and 1969. He also scored eight goals in six games for the U.S. team that finished third in the 1959 Pan-American Games, and played his entire club career for Chicago teams, including Maroon, Slovak and Norwegian-Americans. Inducted in 1998.

Bruce Murray. Forward who played 85 full internationals for the United States between 1986 and 1993. When he retired from the national team, he was its all-time leader in both caps and goals, with 21. Murray played in all three of the United States’ games at the 1990 World Cup, scoring a goal against Austria, and all five of the United States’ games in winning the 1991 CONCACAF Gold Cup, scoring two goals in that tournament. Inducted in 2011.

John “Jukey” Nanoski. Forward who was one of the stars of the Philadelphia Americans teams of the 1940s. Nanoski played for the Americans from 1943 to 1950, winning American Soccer League titles with them in 1944, 1947 and 1948. He had begun his ASL career with St. Mary’s Celtic of Brooklyn in 1938, and won a U.S. Open Cup title with that team in 1939, scoring goals in both legs of the final. ASL goalscoring leader in both 1942 and 1945. Inducted in 1993.

John “Johnny” Nelson. Forward who was the No. 2 all-time goalscorer in the original American Soccer League. Nelson scored 223 goals in his 250 ASL games, second only to Archie Stark among the league’s scorers. Nelson played eight seasons in the ASL, for Brooklyn Wanderers, Fall River Marksmen, J&P Coats, New York Nationals and New York Giants before his career was ended by a knee injury in 1931 at the age of 26. Inducted in 2005.

Werner “Scotty” Nilsen. Forward who played for the United States in the 1934 World Cup. Nilsen, who emigrated from Norway in 1923, played six seasons in the original American Soccer League, primarily for Boston and Fall River, before continuing his career in St. Louis after the end of the original ASL. He won U.S. Open Cup titles in 1930 and 1931 with Fall River, in 1932 with New Bedford and in 1933 and 1934 with Stix, Baer & Fuller of St. Louis. He scored 131 goals in his 239 games in the original ASL. Inducted in 2005.

Patrick “Ace” Ntsoelengoe. Midfielder who was one of the greatest stars of the North American Soccer League. Ntsoelengoe played 11 seasons in the NASL, being named as a first-team all-star in 1979, when he was playing for the Minnesota Kicks, and 1982, when he was with the Toronto Blizzard. Ntsoelengoe, who was South African, played in the NASL offseason for Kaiser Chiefs in South Africa. Inducted in 2003.

William “Shamus” O’Brien. Forward who played in the American Soccer League from 1925 to 1938, winning two league championships. O’Brien, who was born in Scotland and came to America at the age of 11, scored two key goals for the New York Giants in their comeback from a seven-goal deficit in the two-leg ASL final in January 1932. In 1934, the first season of the reformed ASL, he won a second title playing for the Kearny Irish in his adopted hometown. Inducted in 1990.

Gene Olaff. Goalkeeper who played for the Brooklyn Hispano team that won the American Soccer League-U.S. Open Cup double in 1943 and took the Open Cup again a year later. Olaff, who played for Hispano from 1941 to 1953, was the premier American goalkeeper of the 1940s but played only one game for the U.S. Men’s National Team, which went 10 years without a game because of World War II. Inducted in 1971.

Arnold “Arnie” Oliver. Forward who was a member of the United States squad at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Oliver, who won a National Amateur Cup title in 1926 with New Bedford Defenders from his Massachusetts hometown, played in the original American Soccer League from 1925 to 1931 with teams that included J&P Coats, the Providence Gold Bugs and the New Bedford Whalers. Inducted in 1968.

Len Oliver. Midfielder who played in the American Soccer League and for first-division teams in San Francisco in the 1950s and ’60s. Oliver, who won an ASL championship in 1956 with Uhrik Truckers, was hampered by injuries and illnesses at inopportune times through most of his career, but he finally broke into national amateur teams for the 1963 Pan-American Games and 1964 Olympic qualifiers. Inducted in 1996.

Carla Overbeck. Defender who was captain of the United States team at the 1999 Women’s World Cup. That was one of two World Cups that Overbeck won. Her first, as Carla Werden, was in 1991. During her 13 years in the national team, which began in 1988, she played 168 full internationals for the United States. Those included 18 games in her three World Cups and eight in World Cup qualifying. Overbeck also won an Olympic gold medal, a Women’s United Soccer Association title, a W-League title and four NCAA titles during her career. Inducted in 2006.

Gino Pariani. Forward who played in the United States team that beat England in the 1950 World Cup. Pariani, who had scored a goal against Spain in the United States’ previous game, played five full internationals for the United States and also was a member of the U.S. squad at the 1948 Olympic Games in London. He played for various St. Louis teams from the 1940s to the 1960s, including the Simpkins teams that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1948 and 1950. Inducted in 1976.

Bertram Patenaude. Forward who played for the United States in the 1930 World Cup and scored the first hat trick in World Cup history with his three goals against Paraguay. At the time, Patenaude was playing for the Fall River Marksmen of the American Soccer League, with whom he had just won an ASL-U.S. Open Cup-Lewis Cup triple. He won another Open Cup title in 1931 with Fall River and a third in 1935 with Central Breweries of St. Louis. Inducted in 1971.

Pele. Forward who sparked a great upsurge in American soccer when he signed with the New York Cosmos of the North American Soccer League in 1975. Pele, who had won three World Cups with Brazil and was considered the greatest player of all-time, played three seasons with the Cosmos, winning an NASL championship in 1977 and being named as a first-team NASL all-star in all three seasons. Inducted in 1992.

Hugo Perez. Midfielder who played 73 full internationals and scored 13 goals for the United States during a 10-year career in the national team. Perez, who was born in El Salvador and came to the United States as a child, played in the final three seasons of the North American Soccer League and made his national-team debut in 1984. He played several World Cup qualifiers in 1988 and 1989, although he missed the 1990 World Cup itself because of injury, and then was a reserve in the 1994 World Cup, playing one of the four U.S. games. Inducted in 2008.

Eddie Pope. Defender who played for the United States in three World Cups and scored one of the most dramatic goals in American soccer history. Pope played 82 full internationals for the United States between 1996 and 2006, including nine in the World Cup and 31 in World Cup qualifying. During his 12 seasons in Major League Soccer, he won three league titles, and scored the overtime goal that decided the first MLS championship in 1996. Inducted in 2011.

Predrag “Preki” Radosavljevic. Midfielder who broke into the national team after becoming an American citizen in 1996 and was the first man to win the Major League Soccer most valuable player award twice. Preki, who emigrated from Yugoslavia in 1984, played 28 full internationals for the United States between 1996 and 2001, including 10 World Cup qualifiers and two games at the 1998 World Cup. During his 10 seasons in MLS, he was named to the postseason Best XI four times and won one league title, in 2000. Inducted in 2010.

Tab Ramos. Midfielder who played in three World Cups for the United States. Ramos appeared in 81 full internationals for the United States during a national team career that lasted from 1988 to 2000. Those caps included 15 in World Cup qualifiers and nine in the 1990, 1994 and 1998 World Cups. Ramos, who was born in Uruguay and came to the United States as a child, was one of the pioneering American pros in Europe, playing several seasons in Spain in the early 1990s. Inducted in 2005.

Harry Ratican. Forward who was the first major star from St. Louis on the national scene. Ratican, who had played in St. Louis for Ben Millers, moved east in 1915 and played for several eastern teams. He won three U.S. Open Cup titles, with Bethlehem Steel in 1918 and 1919 and Robins Dry Dock in 1921. Ratican twice made Scandinavian tours with American teams, with Bethlehem Steel in 1919 and with a team of St. Louis all-stars in 1920. Inducted in 1950.

Peter “Pete” Renzulli. Goalkeeper who played for a string of American Soccer League clubs in the 1920s and won three U.S. Open Cup titles. Renzulli played in the original ASL from 1922 to 1930, for Todd Shipyards, Paterson, Indiana Flooring, New York Nationals and New York Giants. He won Open Cup titles with Robins Dry Dock in 1921, Paterson in 1923 and New York Nationals in 1928. Inducted in 1951.

Claudio Reyna. Midfielder who was captain of the United States teams in the 2002 and 2006 World Cups. Reyna played 112 full internationals for the United States between 1994 and 2006, including 10 games at the 1998, 2002 and 2006 World Cups and 31 World Cup qualifiers. During his club career, he played for Wolfsburg in Germany, Rangers in Scotland, Sunderland and Manchester City in England, and the MetroStars in MLS. At Rangers, he became the first American to win a first-division title in Europe. Inducted in 2012.

Jimmy Roe. Forward who starred in the Stix-Breweries-Shamrocks dynasty that dominated St. Louis soccer in the 1930s. Roe won three U.S. Open Cup titles, with Stix, Baer & Fuller in 1933 and 1934 and Central Breweries in 1935. Roe, who joined Stix in 1930, played in the Open Cup final in six consecutive years and won St. Louis league championships in 1933, 1934 and 1935. Inducted in 1997.

Kyle Rote Jr. Forward who was one of the leading American players in the North American Soccer League, drawing considerable attention to the sport. Rote, the son of an American football icon, played six seasons in the NASL and led it in scoring in his rookie year, 1973. During his NASL career, he scored 44 goals in 150 games. He played five full internationals for the United States between 1973 and 1975. Inducted in 2010.

Werner Roth. Defender who was captain of the New York Cosmos team that won the NASL championship in 1977. Roth, who played for the Cosmos from 1972 to 1979, was one of the few Americans who was able to maintain his regular place in the team after the Cosmos began signing large numbers of major foreign stars in the mid-1970s. He played 15 full internationals for the United States between 1972 and 1975, including two World Cup qualifiers in 1972. Inducted in 1989.

Willy Roy. Forward who scored nine goals in the 20 full internationals that he played for the United States in the 1960s and ’70s. Roy, who played five seasons in the NASL for Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago, had been one of the leading stars of the National Soccer League of Chicago in the 1960s, playing primarily for Hansa. His 20 U.S. caps included 11 World Cup qualifiers between 1965 and 1972. Inducted in 1989.

Francis “Hun” Ryan. Midfielder who played for the United States at the 1934 World Cup in Italy and the 1936 Olympic Games in Germany. Ryan was a star of the Philadelphia German-Americans team from 1931 to 1937, winning the National Amateur Cup in 1933 and 1934, the American Soccer League championship in 1935 and the U.S. Open Cup in 1936, and he played for other Philadelphia clubs for several more ASL seasons. Inducted in 1958.

Fabri Salcedo. Forward who was a prolific goalscorer for New York, Chicago and Philadelphia teams from 1934 to 1948. Salcedo spent most of his career playing for Brooklyn Hispano of the American Soccer League, winning an ASL title with Hispano in 1943 and U.S. Open Cups in 1943 and 1944. He also reached the cup final in 1939 with Manhattan Beer of Chicago and won a second ASL title in 1948 with the Philadelphia Nationals. Salcedo won the ASL scoring title three times, in 1938, 1941 and 1946. Inducted in 2005.

Willy Schaller. Defender who represented the United States in the 1952 Olympic Games in Finland and the 1959 Pan-American Games in Chicago, where the United States achieved a surprise third place. Schaller, who was born in Germany and came to America as a child, played most of his career in the German-American Soccer League of New York, particularly with Blau-Weiss Gottschee, and appeared in many GASL selections against touring foreign teams. Inducted in 1995.

Philip Slone. Midfielder who was a member of the United States squad at the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Slone had begun his American Soccer League career in 1929 with New York Giants, and after the end of the original ASL, played for Brookhattan in the second ASL throughout the 1930s. Played one full international for the United States, a friendly against Brazil in 1930. Inducted in 1986.

Bobby Smith. Defender who played in the North American Soccer League and the U.S. Men’s National Team in the 1970s. Smith was a member of the Philadelphia Atoms team that won the NASL title as an expansion team in 1973. He eventually played nine NASL seasons for five different clubs, and was a member of the New York Cosmos teams that won NASL titles in 1977 and 1978. Smith played 18 full internationals for the United States, including four World Cup qualifiers in 1976. Inducted in 2007.

Ed Souza. Forward who played in the United States’ victory over England in the 1950 World Cup. That game was among six full internationals that Souza played for the United States between 1947 and 1954. He won a U.S. Open Cup title in 1947 with Ponta Delgada of Fall River and captured the National Amateur Cup three times, with Ponta Delgada in 1947 and 1950 and with German-Hungarians of Brooklyn in 1951. Inducted in 1976.

John “Clarkie” Souza. Forward who played alongside Ed Souza, to whom he was not related, in the victory over England in the 1950 World Cup. Souza played 16 full internationals for the United States, including the game against Scotland before a crowd of 107,765 in 1952. He represented the United States in the 1948 and 1952 Olympic Games, and he won a U.S. Open Cup title in 1947 and National Amateur Cup titles in 1946, 1947, 1948 and 1951. Inducted in 1976.

Charles “Dick” Spalding. Defender who scored the first goal ever for the United States in a full international, against Sweden in 1916. Spalding, who was playing for Disston AA in Philadelphia at the time, later played two seasons in the original American Soccer League for Harrison AA and Fleischer Yarn and eventually became a Major League Baseball player for the Philadelphia Phillies and Washington Senators. Inducted in 1950.

Archie Stark. Forward who was the greatest first-division goalscorer in U.S. Soccer history, setting records that stand more than 80 years later for goals in a first-division season (67) and a first-division career (260). Stark had his greatest years with Bethlehem Steel of the American Soccer League in the late 1920s, although he had already been a pro for nearly a decade before he joined Bethlehem in 1924. Played only two full internationals for the United States, both in 1925, scoring four goals in one of those games. Inducted in 1950.

Earnie Stewart. Forward who played in three World Cups. Stewart played 101 full internationals for the U.S. between 1990 and 2004, including 30 World Cup qualifiers and deep runs in the 1995 Copa America, the 1999 Confederations Cup and the 2002 World Cup. He scored the winning goal against Colombia in the 1994 World Cup and captained the U.S. to its win over Portugal in the 2002 World Cup. He spent most of his club career in his native Holland but won an MLS title with D.C. United in 2004. Inducted in 2011.

Thomas Swords. Forward who was captain of the first U.S. Men’s National Team, the squad that made a Scandinavian tour in the summer of 1916. Swords played the largest part of his career for the Fall River Rovers, from 1904 to 1909 and 1914 to 1920. He scored the only goal of Fall River’s 1-0 victory over Bethlehem Steel in the 1917 U.S. Open Cup final and also played in the cup final in 1916 and 1918. Inducted in 1951.

George Tintle. Goalkeeper who was the first famous goalie in American soccer history, making Scandinavian tours with the U.S. National Team in 1916, Bethlehem Steel in 1919 and a St. Louis all-star team in 1920. Tintle played for a string of different teams during his career, including Harrison AA in the first two seasons of the original American Soccer League. Inducted in 1952.

Raphael “Ralph” Tracey. Midfielder who played for the United States in the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Tracey played all three United States games in that World Cup but was unable to play the second half of the semifinal against Argentina after suffering a knee injury 20 minutes into the game. Played for several St. Louis clubs and reached the final of the U.S. Open Cup in 1926 with Ben Millers. Inducted in 1986.

Al Trost. Midfielder who played in the North American Soccer League and was captain of the U.S. team in World Cup qualifying in 1976. Trost played five of his seven NASL seasons with the St. Louis Stars in his hometown, appearing in 151 NASL games and scoring 38 goals. He played 14 full internationals for the United States between 1973 and 1978 and captained the U.S. through its five-game qualifying series against Canada and Mexico in 1976. Inducted in 2006.

Frank Vaughn. Defender who was a member of the United States squad at the inaugural World Cup in Uruguay in 1930. At the time of his selection to that World Cup team, Vaughn was playing for Ben Millers of the St. Louis Soccer League, one of several outstanding St. Louis teams he played for during his long and successful career. Along with his club teammate Ralph Tracey, started the tradition of St. Louis players on U.S. World Cup rosters. Inducted in 1986.

Frank “Pee Wee” Wallace. Forward who played in the United States team that upset England in the 1950 World Cup. Wallace played for several St. Louis teams, including Rafertys and Simpkins, winning U.S. Open Cup titles with Simpkins in 1948 and 1950. He played seven full internationals for the United States in 1949 and 1950, including four World Cup qualifiers in 1949. Inducted in 1976.

Alex Weir. Defender who played in the American Soccer League from 1936 to 1949. Weir, who emigrated from Scotland at the age of 19, played for St. Mary’s Celtic of Brooklyn, New York Americans, Brooklyn Wanderers and Brookhattan Galicia during his ASL career. He was captain of the St. Mary’s Celtic team that reached the final of the U.S. Open Cup in 1938. Inducted in 1975.

Alan Willey. Forward who was the No. 2 goalscorer in North American Soccer League history, surpassed only by Giorgio Chinaglia. Willey played nine seasons in the NASL, for the Minnesota Kicks, Montreal Manic and Minnesota Strikers. He appeared in 264 NASL games and scored 142 goals in those games. Before moving to the NASL in 1976, Willey had played several seasons for Middlesborough in the English first division. Inducted in 2003.

Bruce Wilson. Defender who played 11 seasons in the North American Soccer League. Wilson played a total of 299 NASL games for the Vancouver Whitecaps, Chicago Sting, New York Cosmos and Toronto Blizzard. He was chosen as a first-team NASL all-star three times, in 1977, 1979 and 1984, and won an NASL championship in 1980 with New York. Wilson played 57 full internationals for Canada and captained Canada in its three games in the 1986 World Cup. Inducted in 2003.

Peter Wilson. Defender who played for several strong American teams after emigrating from Scotland in 1898. Wilson played for Scots-Americans of Kearny, N.J., Paterson Rangers, Pawtucket Rangers and Philadelphia Hibernians. Counting the two seasons he had played for St. Johnstone in Scotland, he was a professional soccer player for 25 years. Inducted in 1950.

Mike Windischmann. Defender who was captain of the United States team in the 1990 World Cup in Italy. Windischmann played 51 full internationals for the United States between 1984 and 1990. In addition to the three games at the 1990 World Cup, those caps included 13 World Cup qualifiers in 1985, 1988 and 1989. He was captain of the team that beat Trinidad in a crucial 1989 qualifier. Windischmann played most of his club career for the Brooklyn Italians of New York’s Cosmopolitan League. Inducted in 2004.

Adam Wolanin. Forward who played for the United States in the 1950 World Cup in Brazil, appearing in the United States’ game against Spain in that World Cup. Wolanin, who was born in Poland, played for several teams in the National Soccer League of Chicago, including Maroons, Eagles and Falcons. He played for the Falcons team that won the 1953 U.S. Open Cup. Inducted in 1976.

Alexander Wood. Defender who played for the United States in the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Wood, who was born in Scotland and emigrated to the United States as a teenager in 1921, played four full internationals for the United States, three at the 1930 World Cup and one during the trip home from that World Cup. Before 1930, he had played for midwestern teams like Chicago Bricklayers and Holley Carburetor of Detroit and then played several seasons for English pro teams in the 1930s. Inducted in 1986.

Eric Wynalda. Forward who scored 34 goals for the U.S. Men’s National Team, a record at the time that he retired. Wynalda played 106 full internationals for the United States. In addition to the 1990, 1994 and 1998 World Cups, Wynalda played in a number of other major events, including the 1995 Copa America, where he scored three goals in five games and was named to the all-tournament team. Wynalda, who played several seasons in Germany in the early 1990s, finished his career with six Major League Soccer seasons. Inducted in 2004.

Al Zerhusen. Midfielder who played for the United States in World Cup qualifiers in 1957, 1960 and 1965. Zerhusen played nine full internationals for the United States, but his greatest days in a U.S. uniform may have been at the 1959 Pan-American Games, where he scored 10 goals in the United States’ six games. He was captain of the Los Angeles Kickers for 10 years, including the teams that won the U.S. Open Cup in 1958 and 1964. Inducted in 1978.

×