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U.S. WNT Defeats Mexico 4-0 in Final Tune-Up for CONCACAF Women's Championship

Amy Rodriguez, Megan Rapinoe, Tobin Heath and Alex Morgan Tally Goals;
USA Eyes 2014 CONCACAF Women’s Championship Starting Oct. 15 vs. Trinidad & Tobago at Sporting Park in Kansas City

  • DateThursday, September 18, 2014
  • VenueSahlen's Stadium; Rochester, N.Y.
  • Kickoff7:00 PM ET
  • Attendance5,680
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#USAvMEX

-U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report- 

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Mexico
Date: Sept. 18, 2014
Competition: International Friendly
Venue: Sahlen’s Stadium; Rochester, New York
Kickoff: 7 p.m. ET
Attendance: 5,680
Weather: 54 degrees, partly cloudy 

Scoring Summary:       1      2      F
USA                                 3      1      4
MEX                                0      0      0 

USA – Amy Rodriguez (Megan Rapinoe)                          9th minute
USA – Megan Rapinoe                                                        37
USA – Tobin Heath (Amy Rodriguez)                                44
USA – Alex Morgan (Heather O’Reilly)                            79 

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo (capt.); 5-Kelley O’Hara, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 3-Christie Rampone, 25-Meghan Klingenberg (19-Crystal Dunn, 61); 12-Lauren Holiday (16-Julie Johnston, 46), 10-Carli Lloyd, 15-Megan Rapinoe (20-Abby Wambach, 46); 2-Sydney Leroux (23-Christen Press, 67), 8-Amy Rodriguez (13-Alex Morgan, 46), 17-Tobin Heath (9-Heather O’Reilly, 46)
Substitutions Not Used: 24-Ashlyn Harris
Head Coach: Jill Ellis 

MEX: 1-Cecilia Santiago; 2-Arianna Romero, 3-Monica Alvarado, 5-Paulina Solis, 13-Bianca Sierra; 6-Liliana Mercado (11-Kenti Robles, 57), 7-Nayeli Rangel, 10-Stephany Mayor, 17-Veronica Perez (capt.) (14-Christina Murillo, 90+2); 9-Tanya Samarzich (8-Teresa Noyola, 67), 20-Charlyn Corral (19-Luz Duarte, 87)
Substitutions Not Used: 12-Brissa Rangel, 15-Guadalupe Cruzaley, 16-Jazmine Ponce, 18-Jackie Acevedo, 21-Lizbeth Angeles
Head coach: Leonardo Cuellar 

Stats Summary: USA / MEX
Shots:  16 / 4
Shots on Goal: 7 / 1
Saves: 1 / 3
Corner Kicks: 8 / 1
Fouls: 16 / 14
Offside: 3 / 2 

Misconduct Summary:
MEX – Stephany Mayor (caution)                     72nd minute 

Officials:
Referee: Marie-Soleil Beauboin (CAN)
Assistant Referee 1: Marie Charbonneau (CAN)
Assistant Referee 2: Suzanne Morisset (CAN)
Fourth Official: Michelle Pye (CAN) 

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Carli Lloyd

U.S. Soccer to Offer Premium Hospitality for WNT Send-Off Series Matches in San Jose and Carson

CHICAGO (April 20, 2015) – U.S. Soccer invites fans to enjoy pre-game Premium Hospitality ahead of the U.S. Women’s National Team Send-Off Series matches in California this May.

Premium Hospitality will be available on Sunday, May 10, at Avaya Stadium in San Jose, and on Sunday, May 17, at StubHub Center in Carson.

Premium Hospitality is an official U.S. Soccer fundraiser and includes:

  • Premium match ticket
  • Meet and greet, autographs and photos with former Women’s National Team players
  • Access to U.S. Soccer leadership at this private event
  • Superb cuisine and complimentary bar
  • Game-day parking pass
  • Commemorative U.S. Soccer gift

U.S. Soccer is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Proceeds from these events will support important soccer development initiatives, including need-based scholarships for talented young players, high-performance National Team programming and coaching education.

Premium Hospitality is available for individuals and corporate groups. Fans can purchase Premium Hospitality for $400 per person or $1,500 for a group of four (4). Part of your pass is tax-deductible and will be formally recognized by U.S. Soccer after the event.

Fans already holding game tickets may purchase their hospitality pass for $300 per person.

Space is limited for these special VIP events. Contact vip@ussoccer.org to learn more and reserve your spot today. 

Ellis' Chosen 23

On the tough decision she faced selecting the 23 players:
“I think it was narrowing down the last two spots. I feel we have great balance at positions, so it was a bit of a luxury for players that can help us. I think both players I let go, both did tremendously and it was a tough decision for me.”

On her decision to select U.S. WNT midfielder Shannon Boxx:
“She’s been remarkable, from where we were in last October when she came for qualifying to now. Physically she’s been tremendous and she’s turned it around. She played 90 minutes against New Zealand in our closed-door game and did very, very well. I think the experience, the coverage in the center of the midfield, and knowing what kind of role I would use her in, I think for me it just made sense.”

On the confidence this talented field of forwards provides:
“Extremely confident, we’re so diverse. We can play behind, we can play in front and they all got tremendous assets and great experience. We’re stacked at the position; I feel really good. We have proven goal scorers, great options and it’s certainly one of our strengths.”

On what makes this team a success:
“It’s a combination of things. The pure talent on this team, we’re very talented and technical with great athleticism, so I think there’s balance there. It’s always the intangibles with the U.S. I think our mentality, our determination. There’s certainly a tremendous amount of desire in this group. I think just how we play and the tools and the depth we have in our positions. We’re going to need a lot of bodies in Canada with the heat and I think over the past six, seven months, we’ve been able to play a lot of players and give the players experience. I truly feel we’ve vetted the players and I feel confident and excited about the group we have.”

On managing Abby Wambach, whether she would be a starter or come in as a sub:
“We’ve used her in both capacities. It’s pretty formidable to bring Abby into our game. She’s a proven entity in a starting role. Having that luxury and knowing that Abby is a complete professional who always puts the team first gives me confidence that she’ll be there for us on the field, off the field, starting, coming in; she’s a proven winner and a clutch player and I won’t lose sight of that.”

Canada, Here We Come: U.S. WNT Players React on Making U.S. Women's World Cup Roster

U.S. WNT Goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher

On making the Women’s World Cup Team:

“I am incredibly excited about being named to the roster and going to my first World Cup this summer. This is such an amazing opportunity and something I have been working toward for a long time. It is always an honor to represent the U.S., and to be able to do that with my teammates at a World Cup is a blessing and an experience I will never forget. It has been quite a journey already, and I am looking forward to the next chapter.”

U.S. WNT Midfielder Carli Lloyd

On making her third Women’s World Cup roster:
“It’s definitely always an honor to make any roster. Nothing is a guarantee at this level. I’m thankful that I can be participating and we can be competing in my third World Cup. I think this World Cup is different than my previous two in the sense that obviously your first World Cup you’re getting your feet wet, second World Cup we fell short and there was some unfinished business. Now, I see myself as a role model, a leader and there’s a lot on the line. That’s what I live for, those pressure situations. I thrive under those pressure situations. I’m just ready it, I’m anxious. I’m thinking about it already at night, before I go to bed; I’m so anticipating that opening game.”

U.S. WNT Defender Meghan Klingenberg

On getting the call to make it official:
“Getting a call to go to the World Cup is the biggest honor I have ever received in my life. I cannot wait to represent my country to the best of my ability on and off the field. We’re excited to really go after it and hopefully bring the World Cup home to the U.S.”

On nerves heading into her World Cup:
“Having nerves going to the World Cup just shows how much you care about being there, representing your country and doing well. As long as you’re able to manage those in a positive way, I think it can only be helpful going into the tournament.”

U.S. WNT Midfielder Morgan Brian

On getting the call from Jill Ellis:
“I think we all knew we were going to find out on the same day, so we were a little bit nervous looking at our phones and waiting for the call. It’s a true honor to represent my country and play at a World Cup, especially at such a young age. I’m really looking forward to the experience and think it will be something I remember for the rest of my life.”

On if the news of making the roster has sunk in yet:
“I don’t think I’ve let it sink in, but at the same time I’ve dreamed about this since I was a little girl and for it to finally be official and for the dream to come true is surreal. For me it’s just been a whirlwind. I don’t think it’s going to sink in because you just think to yourself ‘I’m on the United States Women’s National Team playing in a World Cup’ and that’s insane to me. It’s cool to finally have that dream come true.”

U.S. WNT Defender Becky Sauerbrunn

On making her second Women’s World Cup roster:
“It’s an honor to represent our country at an event like the World Cup. I am thrilled to be on the roster and I hope to make our nation proud.”

U.S. WNT Midfielder Heather O’Reilly

On making her third Women’s World Cup Team:
“There are many talented players in our country and I am honored to represent the United States in our quest for the third star.”

U.S. WNT Forward Amy Rodriguez

On making her second Women’s World Cup Team:
“I’m very excited to be named to the World Cup roster. There were times that I didn’t think I would make it, so I am truly honored and grateful to represent the U.S. this summer.”

U.S. WNT Midfielder Lauren Holiday:

On making her second Women’s World Cup Team:
“I feel extremely blessed to be a part of a team as special as this one. There is no better feeling than putting on that U.S. jersey and representing your country.”

U.S. WNT Midfielder Megan Rapinoe

On being named to the Women’s World Cup roster:
“It’s so exciting. The World Cup is everything. To be able to say that in my career this will be the second one is really special. It definitely doesn’t get old by any means. I am thrilled and I can’t wait. It feels like it’s getting to the time and the energy is really rising. Everyone is really excited.”

On her big week:
“It’s really exciting. It’s all happening at one time; getting named to the World Cup roster, getting 100 caps, and getting my first-ever official hat trick in the season opener with Seattle Reign. It’s exciting. I am buzzing right now.”

U.S. WNT Goalkeeper Hope Solo

On being named to the Women’s World Cup roster:
“It’s funny, because I am a veteran now and it’s my third World Cup, but still, when the roster was set, when Jill called me up and said ‘Congratulations, you’ve made the World Cup roster,’ I still felt emotional, happy, filled with joy and proud. Anything can happen. You work for four years to make another roster and another roster and so it was just a nice dose of reality to know that I officially made the roster.”

U.S. WNT Defender Ali Krieger

On making the Women’s World Cup roster:
“Firstly, I’m very honored and privileged to represent my country as a member of this incredible group of Footballers. Second, I am extremely excited for another opportunity to win the World Cup! Having thought about our 2011 World Cup Final against Japan for the past four years, it has driven me to continue to get better every day to make sure we get back to the Final again this summer. This is something we have been working our entire lives for and therefore I feel very fortunate to be able to play on one of football’s biggest stages. We are well-prepared, motivated, determined and ready to succeed and I can’t wait!”

U.S. WNT Goalkeeper Ashlyn Harris

On making her first Women’s World Cup roster:
"I'm overwhelmed with emotion at this point. Words can't explain how honored I am to represent my country on the highest stage. I've worked my whole life for this moment. I want to thank my family, friends, and my club for the constant support and encouragement to get me where I am today. However, there is no time to celebrate or rest at this point. My dream is to win a World Cup and I will do everything in my power to bring that home to our country."

The WNT 23: Depth, Versatility and Balance

Through the first six FIFA Women’s World Cups, 61 American players saw action in the tournament while representing the USA on the grandest stage of the sport. The seventh Women’s World Cup roster in U.S. history has now been set, and we can add eight new names who are hoping to join that elite club.

The eight Women’s World Cup debutantes -- Ashlyn Harris, Alyssa Naeher, Whitney Engen, Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Morgan Brian, Sydney Leroux and Christen Press – represent the main strengths of this roster: depth, versatility and a blend of tremendous experience with some extremely gifted young talent.

These young guns not only give U.S. head coach Jill Ellis options in the starting lineup (they have been in the first XI for 26 games combined this year) but like many of their teammates, several can contribute at multiple positions. And of course, they provide some remarkably important ingredients to any successful team; young legs and an influx of youthful energy and wonder.

Depth

This Women’s World Cup roster may be the deepest ever assembled for a U.S. team, with almost every player having shown she can start and produce in an important match. It’s no secret that depth will be a key component for the teams that find success this summer, as the tournament now requires seven games to lift the trophy.

It will take seven of the most pressure-packed and competitive matches of a player’s career over a 30-day span to win the Women’s World Cup, and it’s a big ask for any player to play every minute. Ellis and her staff will be able to navigate those difficulties with 20 field players who are all confident and ready for the challenge.

“The past six months we’ve absorbed some injuries, but that’s helped improve our depth, and I feel confident that any one of our 23 players can start a game in the World Cup if needed,” said Ellis. “We’ve been able to play challenging teams and that has allowed us to vet our younger players and get them some great experience.”

Although Hope Solo will likely play every minute in goal for the second Women’s World Cup tournament in a row, Harris has done well in her starts this year and Ellis’ stated goal of having at least two starters at every position seems to have come to fruition.

At center back, the USA has four legitimate starters, including of course captain Christie Rampone, who has played the lion’s share of her 304 caps in the middle. Becky Sauerbrunn has become the USA’s most consistent presence in the middle of the defense, bolstered by Whitney Engen and Julie Johnston, the latter of whom has recently shown her international chops with a tremendous performance in three games at the Algarve Cup. She has already captained a U.S. team to a World Cup title, leading the U-20s in 2012 in Japan.

The USA also has four outside backs ready for selection, three of whom – Meghan Klingenberg, Kelley O’Hara and Lori Chalupny – can play on both flanks. Ali Krieger, who was one of the USA’s best players at the 2011 Women’s World Cup, is solidly entrenched on the right side, but has played in the middle extensively with her club.

The USA could play any of several combinations of central midfielders with veteran Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday and 22-year-old Morgan Brian likely to see the most minutes. Thirty-eight-year-old Shannon Boxx makes her fourth and final World Cup team and could provide valuable minutes to lock down a match.

On the flanks, the USA’s experience is vast, with Heather O’Reilly, Tobin Heath, Megan Rapinoe, and recently, Christen Press, adding many valuable dimensions from both sides of the field.

Of course, the USA’s five forwards bring an array of strengths, all of them sure to cause trouble for opponents. The lethal finishing abilities of Abby Wambach inside the penalty box, the breakaway speed of Alex Morgan and Amy Rodriguez, the scoring guile and final third explosiveness of Christen Press and the tenacity and bravery of Sydney Leroux are all difficult for opposing defenses to deal with.

Versatility

Having depth is one thing, but having depth AND versatility among those players is another thing entirely. The combination of the two gives the coaching staff the ability to line up in different starting formations and to change tactics during the course of the game, with substitutions, with the players already on the field, or both.

As mentioned above, the USA has outside backs who can play on both sides as well as several other players who can play flank midfield or push more forward, most notably Press, who has 20 goals in her first 41 games, and wingers Heath and O’Reilly. Lloyd, who has also played a few games in a wider role, Brian and Holiday are equally comfortable in defensive and attacking roles in the midfield while the offensive chops of Boxx, long more of a defensive-minded player, have never been questioned. She has 27 international goals and 24 assists in her long career.

Ellis has often spoken of the importance of relationships on the field, and who plays where and with whom will of course be a key to the USA’s success this summer.

“We’ve had several players over the past six months who have familiarized themselves with different roles within the team,” said Ellis. “The players have a really good understanding of their role, but if needed, can play another one as well.”

Balance

Any successful team has a blend of veteran leadership, young pros with plenty of experience and wide-eyed twenty-somethings who are itching to make an impact while pushing the veterans. This U.S. roster seems to have that mix.

History has shown that older teams tend to more often win world championships, but dependence on just experience is a gamble, as a team never wants to have too many players with too many miles on their odometers. Although the U.S. Women’s World Cup roster averages a remarkable 101 caps per player (with Rampone’s 304, Wambach’s 238 and O’Reilly’s 217 skewing that figure a bit), the average age is 28 years old, seemingly a perfect number. That’s how a team can combine talent with experience and fitness, as the majority of the roster is in their prime for international players.

“With only three subs in a match, having good cover in positions in all major lines and being able to have flexibility in the lineup allows you to adjust and adapt,” said Ellis. “Having players with that versatility allows us to do that within a match. With the potential of several games in heat and all of them on turf, having a good balance at goalkeeper, defense, midfield and at forward allows us to potentially rest players or have fresh legs when we need them.”

Any successful team has players who not only know their roles and embrace their roles but also execute their roles to the overall benefit of the team. With tremendous depth, versatility and balance to the 2015 U.S. Women’s World Cup Team, the squad seems poised for another deep run in this tournament.

2015 U.S. Women’s FIFA World Cup Team: By the Numbers

By the Numbers…

2          Number of players in U.S. history to be named to Women’s World Cup rosters for non-consecutive tournaments: Brandi Chastain (1991, 1999) and Lori Chalupny (2007, 2015)

4          Number of players to have previously played in five Women’s World Cups: Kristine Lilly of the USA (1991-2007), Formiga of Brazil (1995-2011), Birgit Prinz of Germany (1995-2011) and Homare Sawa of Japan (1995-2011). Christie Rampone could join that group in Canada. Formiga and Sawa have a chance to play in their sixth tournaments this summer. Bente Nordby of Norway (1991-2007) was on five Women’s World Cup rosters but played in four tournaments.

4          Number of players on the WWC roster from the Chicago Red Stars and FC Kansas City, most of any NWSL teams.

6          Players on the roster who hail from California. Four are from New Jersey, two are from Georgia and two are from St. Louis, Mo.

7          Number of games it will take to win the 2015 Women’s World Cup, up from six in the previous six editions of the tournament.

8          U.S. players making their first Women’s World Cup roster: Ashlyn Harris, Alyssa Naeher, Whitney Engen, Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Morgan Brian, Sydney Leroux and Christen Press.

8          Number of players on the U.S. roster who have scored in a WWC tournament.

9          Former FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup champions on the 2015 WWC roster: Harris (2002), Naeher (2008), Lori Chalupny (2002), Johnston (2012), Klingenberg (2008), Brian (2012), Heather O’Reilly (2002), Leroux (2008), Alex Morgan (2008)

9          Caps for Johnston, the least of any of the field players to make the WWC team.

11        Number of players, out of 13, who played in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game who made this WWC roster.

13        Goals by Abby Wambach in Women’s World Cup play, a U.S. record.

15        Players on the roster have played for the USA in a FIFA Women’s World Cup at the         youth level.

18        Women’s World Cup matches played by Wambach, the most on the 2015 WWC roster. Rampone has played in 17 Women’s World Cup games while Boxx has 15. Other players in double figures in Women’s World Cup matches are Carli Lloyd (11), O’Reilly (11) and Hope Solo (10).

22        Age of Brian, the youngest player on the WWC roster. Johnston is 23.

23        Number of players on Women’s World Cup rosters, up from 21 for the 2011 tournament.

24        Number of nations that will participate, for the first time, in the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams.

27        Total Women’s World Cup goals scored by the USA’s WWC roster.

28        Average age of the USA’s WWC roster.

32        Goals allowed by the U.S. Women in WWC play.

36        Number of matches played by the USA in the WWC (27-4-5), most by any team.

39        Age of Rampone, the oldest player on the WWC roster. Boxx is 38.

98        Goals scored by the U.S. Women in WWC play.

101      Average caps per player on the WWC roster.

122      Number of Women’s World Cup matches combined played by the WWC roster.

304      Caps for Rampone, most of the Women’s World Cup roster, most of any active player in the world, and second most in soccer history.

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