U.S. Soccer

WNT Downs Brazil 3-1 in Front of Record-Crowd in Orlando as Holiday, Chalupny Play Final International Game

ORLANDO (Oct. 25, 2015) – The World Cup Champion U.S. Women’s National Team continued its Victory Tour with a  3-1 victory against Brazil at the Orlando Citrus Bowl in front of 32, 869 fans, the largest stand-alone crowd to watch the USA friendly in the state of Florida.

Defender Lori Chalupny and midfielder Lauren Holiday played in their final match for the USWNT and were honored before the game. Both are World Cup and Olympic champions and retire as two of the most successful players to put on the USA jersey, earning 106 and 133 caps, respectively.

It was a fast-paced, end-to-end match that saw Brazil control the play for significant parts of the game, but the Americans finished their chances to defeat Brazil for the first time in the last four meetings (one loss, two ties and a win). Both teams created early chances, but unlike their last meeting four days ago – a 1-1 tie in Seattle - it was the United States that got on the scoreboard first. In the ninth minute, Alex Morgan received a perfect through pass from Tobin Heath on the left side, ran past the defense, rounded the goalkeeper and slotted it home.

Nearing the end of the first half regulation time, Brazil got its equalizer when Cristiane received a nice slip pass from Marta in the right side of the penalty box. She cut back inside to beat a defender and hit a powerful left-footed shot from just inside the penalty box that flew straight to the left corner.

The USA mounted an immediate response and went ahead three minutes later when a point-blank header from Lindsey Horan was blocked by Brazil goalkeeper Luciana but rebounded to Crystal Dunn, finished through traffic with her right foot to regain the lead just before halftime.

Stephanie McCaffrey, who was making her USWNT debut, added another score in the fourth minute of second-half stoppage, volleying home a perfect Megan Rapinoe cross from the left side for the final score line. Hope Solo was once again solid in goal for the USA, making two saves while dominating the penalty box against a talented Brazilian attack.

With the win, the WNT extended its unbeaten home streak to 102 games (89-0-13). The last loss at home came to Denmark on Nov. 6, 2004, in Philadelphia.

The USWNT will resume its Victory Tour in December when it takes on Trinidad & Tobago on Dec. 6 in Hawaii and on Dec. 10 in San Antonio, Texas. The team will then face China PR in Glendale, Arizona on Dec. 13 and again in New Orleans on Dec. 16.  

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Alex Morgan (Tobin Heath), 9th minute.
Tobin Heath found some space down the left sideline and timed her pass perfectly to Alex Morgan, who made a precisely timed run to beat the Brazil back line. Morgan outran her defenders and then beat Brazil goalkeeper Luciana to the left before rolling the ball into and open net for her 55th career goal. USA 1, BRA 0. (SEE GOAL)

BRA – Cristiane (Marta), 45th minute: Marta found Cristiane with a nice slip pass into the box on the left side and Cristiane did the rest, cutting back to lose a U.S. defender before ripping a left-footed shot into the left corner. USA 1, BRA 1.

USA – Crystal Dunn (Lindsey Horan), 45+3: After Brazil had found the equalizer right before the 45-minute mark the USA answered back three minutes into stoppage as Meghan Klingenberg crossed a ball to the far post where Lindsey Horan headed it on goal. Luciana was able to block the point-blank attempt, but it rebounded back Crystal Dunn who finished with a right-footed strike from close range. USA 2, BRA 1. (SEE GOAL)

USA – Stephanie McCaffrey (Megan Rapinoe), 90+4: Just before the final whistle blew as the USA was killing off the game, Megan Rapinoe worked her way free on the left flank and crossed it to Stephanie McCaffrey who was able to re-direct the ball into the net at the back post to make it 3-1. It was McCaffrey’s first career goal on her debut with the USWNT. USA 3, BRA 1, FINAL. (SEE GOAL)

Key Saves and Defensive Stops:
USA – Becky Sauerbrunn, 24th minute:
Brazil’s counterattacked down the left side and crossed to the far post where Cristiane had an open shot from close range, but somehow Becky Sauerbrunn recovered to clear the ball away just inches from it crossing the line.

Next on the Schedule: The WNT will continue its Victory Tour with the final four games in December, making stops in Hawaii on Dec. 6, and San Antonio, Texas on Dec. 10. The team will then face Trinidad & Tobago in Glendale, Arizona on Dec. 13, and New Orleans on Dec. 16 to face China PR.
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Milestone Watch:

  • Lauren Holiday, who left the game in the 56th minute to a rousing ovation and was replaced by Carli Lloyd, ends her career with 133 caps and 24 goals.
  • Lori Chalupny, who left the game in the 21st minute to a rousing ovation and was replaced by Meghan Klingenberg, ends her career with 106 caps and 10 goals.
  • Holiday started the game wearing the captain’s armband.
  • Forward Stephanie McCaffrey and defender Gina Lewandowski earned their first caps as substitutes. McCaffrey came on at halftime for Tobin Heath. The 30-year-old Lewandowski came on in the 74th minute for Ali Krieger, a teammate on FFC Frankfurt when they won the UEFA Champions League in 2008.
  • With her goal against Brazil, McCaffrey became the 18th USWNT player to score in her first cap. The last player to do it was Christen Press on Feb. 9, 2013, against Scotland.
  • University of Virginia senior Emily Sonnett started in her first cap and played the entire 90 minutes next to Becky Sauerbrunn.
  • Lindsey Horan got her first start for the USA and earned her fourth cap.
  • With the win the USA’s all-time record against Brazil improved to 26-3-5.

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Brazil
Date: Oct. 25, 2015
Competition: International Friendly; Victory Tour
Venue: Orlando Citrus Bowl; Orlando, Florida
Kickoff: 3 p.m. ET
Attendance: 32,869
Weather: 80 degrees; sunny

Scoring Summary:       1          2          F
USA                               2          1          3
BRA                               1          0          1

USA – Alex Morgan (Tobin Heath)                                  9th minute
BRA – Cristiane (Marta)                                                   45
USA – Crystal Dunn (Lindsey Horan)                              45+3
USA – Stephanie McCaffrey (Megan Rapinoe)                94

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger (30-Gina Lewandowski, 74), 27-Emily Sonnett, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 16-Lori Chalupny (22-Meghan Klingenberg, 21); 25-Crystal Dunn (15-Megan Rapinoe, 60), 12-Lauren Holiday (capt.) (10-Carli Lloyd, 56), 14-Morgan Brian, 17-Tobin Heath (28-Stephanie McCaffrey, 46); 31-Lindsey Horan (8-Amy Rodriguez, 80), 13-Alex Morgan
Subs Not Used: 2-Sydney Leroux, 3-Christie Rampone, 5-Kelley O’Hara, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 18-Ashlyn Harris, 19-Julie Johnston, 20-Abby Wambach, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press, 29-Samantha Mewis
Head coach: Jill Ellis

BRA: 1-Luciana; 2-Fabiana, 4-Rafaelle, 5-Andressinha, 6-Tamires (7-Beatriz, 71), 8-Thaisa, 9-Andressa Alves, 10-Marta (capt.), 11-Cristiane, 14-Erika, 20-Formiga (17-Gabi Zanotti, 63)
Subs Not Used: 3-Monica, 12-Andreia, 13-Poliana, 15-Rilany, 16-Rafaela, 18-Bia Vaz, 19-Raquel
Head coach: Oswaldo Alvarez

Stats Summary: USA / BRA
Shots: 8 / 13
Shots on Goal: 5 / 4
Saves:  2 / 2
Corner Kicks: 2 / 6
Fouls: 11 / 5
Offside: 4 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
USA – Crystal Dunn (caution)   14th minute
BRA – Cristiane (caution)          37
USA – Lindsey Horan (caution) 66

Officials:
Referee: Margaret Domka (USA)
Assistant Referee 1: Felisha Mariscal (USA)
Assistant Referee 2: Marie-Josée Charbonneau (CAN)
4th Official: Katja Koroleva (USA)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Lauren Holiday

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WNT Oct 25, 2015
- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Brazil
Date: Oct. 25, 2015
Competition: International Friendly; Victory Tour
Venue: Orlando Citrus Bowl; Orlando, Florida
Kickoff: 3 p.m. ET
Attendance: 32,869
Weather: 80 degrees; sunny

Scoring Summary: 1    2    F
USA                       2    1    3
BRA                       1    0    1

USA – Alex Morgan (Tobin Heath) 9th minute
BRA – Cristiane (Marta) 45
USA – Crystal Dunn (Lindsey Horan) 45+3
USA – Stephanie McCaffrey (Megan Rapinoe) 94

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger (30-Gina Lewandowski, 74), 27-Emily Sonnett, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 16-Lori Chalupny (22-Meghan Klingenberg, 21); 25-Crystal Dunn (15-Megan Rapinoe, 60), 12-Lauren Holiday (capt.) (10-Carli Lloyd, 56), 14-Morgan Brian, 17-Tobin Heath (28-Stephanie McCaffrey, 46); 31-Lindsey Horan (8-Amy Rodriguez, 80), 13-Alex Morgan
Subs Not Used: 2-Sydney Leroux, 3-Christie Rampone, 5-Kelley O’Hara, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 18-Ashlyn Harris, 19-Julie Johnston, 20-Abby Wambach, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press, 29-Samantha Mewis
Head coach: Jill Ellis


BRA: 1-Luciana; 2-Fabiana, 4-Rafaelle, 5-Andressinha, 6-Tamires (7-Beatriz, 71), 8-Thaisa, 9-Andressa Alves, 10-Marta (capt.), 11-Cristiane, 14-Erika, 20-Formiga (17-Gabi Zanotti, 63)
Subs Not Used: 3-Monica, 12-Andreia, 13-Poliana, 15-Rilany, 16-Rafaela, 18-Bia Vaz, 19-Raquel
Head coach: Oswaldo Alvarez


Stats Summary: USA / BRA
Shots: 8 / 13
Shots on Goal: 5 / 4
Saves: 2 / 2
Corner Kicks: 2 / 6
Fouls: 11 / 5
Offside: 4 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
USA – Crystal Dunn (caution) 14th minute
BRA – Cristiane (caution) 37
USA – Lindsey Horan (caution) 66

Officials:
Referee: Margaret Domka (USA)
Assistant Referee 1: Felisha Mariscal (USA)
Assistant Referee 2: Marie-Josée Charbonneau (CAN)
4th Official: Katja Koroleva (USA)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Lauren Holiday

By The Numbers: MNT March World Cup Qualifying

With a 6-0 win against Honduras and 1-1 draw on the road in Panama, the U.S. Men’s National Team got back on track in its quest to qualify for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.

Here’s a look by the numbers at the MNT’s successful run through March:

56 – The number of goals Clint Dempsey has scored all-time for the U.S., placing him just one behind Landon Donovan for the MNT’s all-time lead.

38 – The number of clean sheets Tim Howard has kept during his record-setting 113 international matches. Howard sits second all-time behind Kasey Keller (47).

24 – The number of fouls that the USA and Panama combined for March 28 without a single card shown in the 1-1 draw.

23 – The number of defensive clearances that Tim Ream (14) and Omar Gonzalez (9) combined for against Panama.

21 – The number of World Cup Qualifying wins Bruce Arena has now collected with the 6-0 victory vs. Honduras.

18 – The number of all-time World Cup Qualifying goals Clint Dempsey has scored, retaking the lead in that category from teammate Jozy Altidore during the course of two matches.

USA All-Time World Cup Qualifying Goals Leaderboard

Player

Goals

WCQ Caps

Clint Dempsey

18

38

Jozy Altidore

16

36

Landon Donovan

13

40

Eddie Johnson

12

19

Brian McBride

10

25

17 – The number of players that logged minutes during the MNT’s two March World Cup Qualifiers.

12 - The number of seconds it took from the second half kickoff to Christian Pulisic finding the back of the net against Honduras.

7 – The number of career goals Clint Dempsey now has against Honduras, his most against any international opponent.

6 – The margin of victory in the MNT’s 6-0 win against Honduras, setting a record for largest margin in Final Round World Cup Qualifying since CONCACAF switched to the current format for France ’98.

6 (again) – The number of goals captain Michael Bradley has all-time in World Cup Qualifying.

6 (and again) – The number of players that went the full 90 minutes in both games: Michael Bradley, Clint Dempsey, Omar Gonzalez, Tim Howard, Christian Pulisic, Jorge Villafaña.

5 – Christian Pulisic’s team-leading assist total in 2018 FIFA World Cup Qualifying after adding three combined against Honduras and Panama.

Christian Pulisic’s 2018 FIFA World Cup Qualifying Assists

Number

Date/Result

Goal Scorer (Minute)

1

Sept. 2, 2016; 6-0 W at St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Kljestan (71’)

2

Sept. 9, 2016; 4-0 W vs. Trinidad & Tobago

Altidore (62’)

3

March 24, 2016; 6-0 W vs. Honduras

Dempsey (32’)

4

March 24, 2016; 6-0 W vs. Honduras

Dempsey (49’)

5

March 28, 2016; 1-1 D at Panama

Dempsey (39’)

4 – The number of career goals Clint Dempsey has scored all-time against Panama, as well as the number the veteran striker tallied during the pair of March qualifiers.

3 – The number of players that have scored in their World Cup Qualifying debuts this cycle after Sebastian Lletget found the back of the net in the fifth minute against Honduras. Paul Arriola (Sept. 6, 2016 vs. Trinidad & Tobago) and Bobby Wood (Nov. 13, 2015 vs. St. Vincent & the Grenadines) are the others.

1 – The number of goals the U.S. conceded during the four matches Bruce Arena has been back in charge of the Men’s National Team. 

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MNT Mar 30, 2017

Tobin Heath Ruled Out of April WNT Matches Against Russia

CHICAGO (March 30, 2017) – U.S. Women’s National Team midfielder Tobin Heath has been ruled out of the upcoming training camp and matches against Russia due to a minor back injury. 

Without Heath, the USA will head to training camp today with 22 players. U.S. head coach Jill Ellis will name 18 to suit up for each of the matches against Russia, taking place on April 6 at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas (7:30 p.m. CT on FS1 with the pre-game show starting at 7 p.m.) and in Houston on April 9 at BBVA Compass Stadium (1 p.m. CT on ESPN). 

U.S. Women’s National Team Roster – April Friendlies vs. Russia
GOALKEEPERS (3): Jane Campbell (Houston Dash), Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars)

DEFENDERS (6): Meghan Klingenberg (Portland Thorns FC), Ali Krieger (Orlando Pride), Kelley O’Hara (Sky Blue FC), Megan Oyster (Boston Breakers), Becky Sauerbrunn (FC Kansas City), Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars)

MIDFIELDERS (6): Jaelin Howell (Real Colorado), Rose Lavelle (Boston Breakers), Carli Lloyd (Houston Dash/Manchester City), Allie Long (Portland Thorns FC), Samantha Mewis (NC Courage), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC)

FORWARDS (7): Crystal Dunn (Chelsea FC), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride/Olympique Lyonnais, FRA), Kealia Ohai (Houston Dash), Christen Press (Chicago Red Stars), Mallory Pugh (UCLA), Amy Rodriguez (FC Kansas City), Lynn Williams (NC Courage)

The USA will also be without midfielders Morgan Brian and Lindsey Horan who had to withdraw from the training camp roster due to injuries.

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WNT Mar 30, 2017

Q&A: Getting Started with New Boys' Development Academy Director, Aloys Wijnker

With the 11th season of the U.S. Soccer Development Academy on the horizon this August, ussoccer.com sat down with new Boys' Development Academy Director, Aloys Wijnker, who will oversee all technical aspects of the Boys’ DA after transitioning from his role as a U.S. Soccer Coach Educator. Before working in U.S. Soccer’s coaching education department, Wijnker served as the Academy Director for Dutch club AZ Alkmaar, which was twice named the KNVB's Academy of the Year in 2015 and 2016.

ussoccer.com: How would you evaluate where the Development Academy is at now versus where you would like to see it in the future?

Aloys Wijnker: “A few weeks ago, I read an article about the M.L.S. They are now in their 22nd season and are more mature. When I compare M.L.S. with the Development Academy, which is currently in its 10th season, I see two programs that continue to evolve and build for the future. Like the way we develop as people, 11-year-old kids tend to start thinking on their own and wanting to make their own decisions. As the support system for the clubs, the Development Academy is like the parental figure who wants to provide guidance to their kid’s decision making. For me, the big thing I would most like to see is Academy clubs taking initiative and being confident making technical decisions. We, as U.S. Soccer, will continue to guide them and help them with our back-office support, but we need the people involved with the day-to-day operations of the clubs to make the right decisions, for the future of player development.”

ussoccer.com: Tell us about your background and how that will help you make an impact on the continued growth of the Development Academy?

AW: “Most of my experience comes from working in and with youth academies. I was first a coach, but I have mostly worked as a Director, where I was heavily involved in the development process of players. In my role, not only did I oversee many teams, but I also focused on building the right environment.

“In my 10 years as an Academy Director, I had the opportunity to see the development and what is going on overseas, specifically in the Netherlands. I expect that with my experience, knowledge and what I built there, that I can share it with clubs over here. This last year, as an instructor for the U.S. Soccer Academy Director course, my experience allowed me to get to know the soccer landscape of the U.S. much better. With all of this combined, I think I can have an impact on the clubs and on individual persons related to improving the development of players.”

ussoccer.com: How did your role as a coach educator prepare you for the Academy Director role?

AW: “By leading the Academy Director's Course in 2016, I established great relationships with many of the Boys’ Development Academy Directors. These relationships have allowed me to continue to understand the landscape. I am still gaining experience and I am lucky to have guys around me like Tony Lepore, Jared Micklos and the rest of the Development Academy staff. The TA’s have and will continue to elevate our knowledge and understanding of the U.S. Soccer landscape. This will allow us to know what is happening and what we can change, together. It's a collaborative effort.”

ussoccer.com: In collaboration with the Academy clubs, how can you influence or improve the level of coaching?

AW: “Our task is to influence the clubs, and more specifically, the leadership of the clubs. In most cases, that means the Academy Director because, in the end, he or she is responsible for developing the coaches in their club. We will continue to help create plans for that. One of the main areas of responsibility for a Director is to create, implement and execute the personal development plans for each coach in the club. By creating that plan, we improve the level of coaching. My goal is to influence the Directors, who will in turn influence their own coaches.”

ussoccer.com: What are the next steps for the Development Academy?

AW: “There are a few steps. One of them is that clubs must create their own identity. The identity may already be there, but they need to put it on paper. What is the club’s philosophy? What kind of club are they? What kind of club do they want to be? How do they want to play? What kind of players do they want to develop? These answers, are part of the philosophy that each club needs to build out. Because of this practice, clubs will better know who they are and who they want to be.

“The next step is then to create a talent development plan. How are you going to execute it? How are you going to get there? So again, step one is for every Development Academy club in the U.S. to establish their own philosophy. After that, they have to create and execute a plan to develop that philosophy. We (Technical Advisors and Academy staff) are there to support them, and advise them, but they have to create their own philosophy.”

ussoccer.com: Why is it important that clubs develop their own identities, philosophies and plans?

AW: “It's important because we need to create ownership in the clubs. By ownership I mean that they make the decisions, they create their philosophy and they make their plan, instead of us. As a club, when you can create your own plan and own philosophy, your motivation is 100 percent better than when someone else is telling you what to do. That is why it is so important that the clubs, and the people in the clubs, are responsible for that process. We are there to guide them and to help them, but they must develop that themselves. It's like coaching. Instead of a coach telling players exactly what to do, we believe that we have to develop players who make their own decisions on the field.”

ussoccer.com: How do you plan to help clubs achieve this?

AW: “Together, with each of our Technical Advisors (TA’s), we will provide guidance and support to share our ideas. We will do that by not only conducting sessions where we bring all the Academy Directors together, but also through individual contact between Technical Advisors and the clubs.

“First, we will collaborate on next steps, through communication and presentations. We’ll also do this around each of the Development Academy showcase events, where we will bring in all the Directors and then we will explain our plans. The next step is for TA's to visit clubs and support them in creating their plan and in creating their philosophy. We have created a timeline of what we want to achieve every year, in collaboration with the clubs.”

ussoccer.com: What are the key components of Academy environments that lead to developing players?

AW: “First, you need to have a philosophy. Getting back to the talent development plans, each club must answer the critical questions, “How do you want to play?,” “What kind of players do you want to develop?” Each club needs to have an identity. When you work in an organization, in an Academy, you need to have a plan on paper. Once you have the plan laid out, you have to share it with the coaches and support staff.

“The second step is that you need to have good, qualified coaches with a lot of knowledge, understanding and experience. You need proper resources. This includes fields, lights and opportunities to train when weather conditions are poor. This means having indoor facilities to be able to train when necessary. For those clubs reaching the U-19 level, they must have a full pathway plan for their players. What is the plan and strategy for players to progress to Zone 3* after U-19? Is there a relationship with a professional domestic team? Clubs need to have a next step in the pathway after the Academy for their players. It is not over once they reach the U-19 level. The relationship between an Academy and a pro team is really important. The final goal is to develop world class players who can compete at the highest levels.”

* Zone 1 (age 6-11), Zone 2 (age 12-17), and Zone 3 (age 18 and above).

ussoccer.com: The Development Academy recently announced plans to expand by 165 teams and one new age group (U-15). What’s the benefit of this?

AW: “When you have an Academy Club with teams in Zone 2 (U-13 to U-19) with only the U-17 and the U-19 divisions as the two combined age groups (U-16/17, U-18/19), it is a better player pathway. When you have players in a single age group who are, at a maximum, one year in age difference, it is a more consistent pathway. You also must account for relative age effect, where there can be a difference of more than two years in the biological age. When you bring players together who are in the same growth period, it is better for the development of the player. Instead of having two birth years in one age group, it is more logical to have single age groups, especially at the base of the pyramid (Ages 12-14).

“With 165 Clubs in the Development Academy, it's a lot, but if you look at the size of the country, it is still a relatively small amount. The larger objective is to see Development Academy clubs have a positive impact on their communities and local environments for affiliate clubs and non-Academy clubs in their areas.”

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ACADEMY Mar 30, 2017

KSYSA and NSCAA Team Up for 2017 C Course Opportunity

CHICAGO (March 30, 2017) – U.S. Soccer recently announced 24 new opportunities to register for the C Course that will take place between April 2017 and March 2018. Among these educational opportunities will be a co-hosted C Course organized by the Kansas State Youth Soccer Association (KSYSA) and the National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA).

“U.S. Soccer is committed to engaging, educating and empowering our members,” said U.S. Soccer Director of Coaching Nico Romeijn. “KSYSA and the NSCAA are key members within the soccer community. It’s vital that U.S. Soccer and its members are sharing the same philosophy when it comes to coach education and working together to serve the multitude of coaches and playing environments in the United States. Our collective goal is to create the best learning environment for the development of players at all levels.”

The partnership represents a joint venture to educate and license coaches by two U.S. Soccer member organizations. Established in 1948 and based in Kansas City, the NSCAA serves as the world’s largest coaches organization and serves members at every level of the game. KSYSA serves as one of U.S. Soccer’s fifty-five sanctioned youth soccer associations and oversees 26,000 players, 1,600 coaches and 1,600 referees. As part of U.S. Soccer’s mission to develop world class players, coaches, and referees at all levels, these organizations will team up with local M.L.S. team, Sporting Kansas City, to deliver one of the 2017 C Course opportunities.

“It was an easy to decision to co-host the C Course with NSCAA,” KSYSA Director of Coaching Nathan Hunt said. “They are a great organization that work to help coaches of all levels continue to grow both on and off the field. Kansas State Youth Soccer has a similar, if not congruent mission to help coaches. We have begun a partnership with NSCAA and this is what we believe will be the first of many courses and projects we will collaborate with them on.”

Per U.S. Soccer policies, member organizations may be allowed to run C, D and E Course opportunities with approval and oversight from U.S. Soccer. These courses are run under the instruction and guidance of U.S. Soccer instructional staff based on structured methodology. Aligned with U.S. Soccer’s mission to improve the game at all levels, KSYSA and the NSCAA will collaborate and host U.S. Soccer staff and C Course candidates as they undergo this educational journey.

NSCAA Director of Coaching Ian Barker stressed the importance of collaboration between U.S. Soccer member organizations. “U.S. Soccer is the leader for the development of the game in the United States. The collaboration of member organizations under the umbrella of U.S. Soccer is so important to the success of soccer at the grassroots level all the way to the men’s and women’s National Teams. Where the members of U.S. Soccer can find common ground and forge collaborations, such as the one between the NSCAA and KYSA, the beneficiaries will be the coaches, the players and the game as a whole.”

Meeting 1 for the Kansas City C Course runs July 18-25 with Meeting 2 taking place from October 27-29. Eligible coaches may attempt to register through the U.S. Soccer Digital Coaching Center. Please contact Nathan Hunt or Allison Pronske with any questions specifically related to this opportunity.
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MNT Mar 30, 2017
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