U.S. Soccer

Solo Records Historic 100th International Shutout In 1-0 Win Against South Africa

CHICAGO (July 9, 2016) – Hope Solo became the first goalkeeper in international history to earn 100 international shutouts as the U.S. Women’s National Team defeated South Africa, 1-0 in the first meeting between the two teams.

The crowd of 19,272 fans at Soldier Field also saw Solo earn her 150th career win and Crystal Dunn bag the game-winner in the 35th minute.

The USA had far more possession on the day and numerous quality scoring chances, but the South Africans certainly distinguished themselves with some organized defense, hard running and a few dangerous attacks.

The USA finally broke through 10 minutes before halftime when 18-year-old Mallory Pugh set up Dunn for a close-range finish. Pugh dribbled with pace down the left side of the box and sent a bouncing ball across the face of the goal. Dunn was unmarked at the far post and sent a first-time shot past the goalkeeper for her ninth tally of the year. Pugh earned her team-leading seventh assist through 13 games in her debut year.

Solo had a fine performance, stopping both of South Africa’s shots on goal and dominating her penalty box to reach 100 shutouts in her 197th cap. Her 150th career win extended her record for a goalkeeper.

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Crystal Dunn (Mallory Pugh), 35th minute:
Mallory Pugh carried the ball down the left flank and into the penalty area to the end line. Her left-footed cross bounced through traffic and across the face of the goal to a patient Dunn at the far post. Dunn finished with confidence from four yards out for her ninth goal of the year. Pugh’s assist marks her team-leading seventh in her debut year. USA 1, RSA 0 (SEE GOAL). FINAL

Key Saves and Defensive Stops:
RSA – Nothando Vilakazi, 48th minute:
Kelley O’Hara got forward down the right wing and sent a terrific cross to Allie Long in the middle of the box. Long sent a headed attempt on goal and past goalkeeper Roxanne Barker, but Nothando Vilakazi was in prime position to clear the ball off the goal line with her chest.

Next on the Schedule: The U.S. WNT returns to action for its final Olympic send-off game against Costa Rica on July 22 at Children’s Mercy Park in Kansas City, Kansas (8 p.m. CT: ESPN).

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Additional Notes:

  • The USA improved to 13-0-1 on the year, including 12 shutouts while allowing just four goals.
  • Today’s game marked the first meeting between the U.S. WNT and South Africa in the history of the programs at any level of women’s soccer.
  • Carli Lloyd came on for Lindsey Horan at halftime, marking her first appearance since April 10 after suffering a sprained MCL with the NWSL’s Houston Dash on April 23.
  • Ali Krieger subbed in for Alex Morgan in the 68th minute, Whitney Engen replaced Julie Johnston in the 81st minute, Heather O’Reilly came in for Kelley O’Hara in the 83rd minute and Samantha Mewis subbed in for Mallory Pugh in the 87th minute.
  • Morgan Brian, Megan Rapinoe, Tobin Heath, Gina Lewandowski and Ashlyn Harris did not suit up for the match.
  • Dunn’s ninth goal of 2016 trails only Alex Morgan (11) for the team lead.
  • Heather O’Reilly earned her 230th cap for the USA. Lloyd earned her 223rd.
  • Ali Krieger earned her 90th cap. 

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. South Africa
Date: July 9, 2016
Competition: International Friendly
Venue: Soldier Field; Chicago, Illinois
Kickoff: 12:30 p.m. CT
Attendance: 19,272
Weather: 75 degrees, sunny

Scoring Summary:   1          2          F
USA                            1          0          1
RSA                            0          0          0

USA – Crystal Dunn (Mallory Pugh)  35th minute

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 5-Kelley O’Hara (9-Heather O’Reilly, 83), 8-Julie Johnston (6-Whitney Engen, 81), 4-Becky Sauerbrunn (capt.), 7-Meghan Klingenberg; 23-Allie Long, 12-Christen Press, 20-Lindsey Horan (10-Carli Lloyd, 46); 16-Crystal Dunn, 13-Alex Morgan (11-Ali Krieger, 68), 2-Mallory Pugh (3-Samantha Mewis, 87)
Subs not used: 21-Alyssa Naeher, 22-Emily Sonnett
Head Coach: Jill Ellis

RSA: 1-Roxanne Barker; 15-Refiloe Jane, 4-Noko Matlou, 5-Janine Van Wyk (capt.), 3-Nothando Vilakazi (19-Bambanani Mbane, 87); 20-Stephanie Malherbe, 21-Robyn Moodaly (18-Nompumelelo Nyandeni, 46), 2- Lebohang Ramalepe (17-Leandra Smeda, 56), 12-Jermaine Seoposenwe (11-Chrestinah Kgatlana, 80); 8-Linda Mothlalo (9-Amanda Dlamini, 61), 13-Octovia Nogwanya (14-Sanah Mollo, 24)
Subs not used:
16-Andile Dlamini, 23-Kaylin Swart, 6-Mamello Makhabane, 7-Nomathemba Ntsibande, 10-Silindile Ngubane, 22-Lebogang Mabatle
Head Coach:
Vera Pauw 

Stats Summary: USA / RSA
Shots: 18 / 4
Shots on Goal: 6 / 2
Saves: 2 / 4
Corner Kicks: 10 / 2
Fouls: 11 / 10
Offside: 2 / 2 

Misconduct Summary:
USAMeghan Klingenberg (caution)           84th minute
RSA – Nompumelelo Nyandeni (caution)      90+2

Officials:
Referee: Maria Serpas (SLV)
Assistant Referee 1: Elizabeth Aguilar (SLV)
Assistant Referee 2: Emperatriz Ayala (SLV)
4th Official: Sandra Arteaga (SLV) 

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Hope Solo

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WNT Jul 9, 2016

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. South Africa
Date: July 9, 2016
Competition: International Friendly
Venue: Soldier Field; Chicago, Illinois
Kickoff: 12:30 p.m. CT
Attendance: 19,272
Weather: 75 degrees, sunny

Scoring Summary:       1          2          F
USA                             1          0          1
RSA                             0          0          0

USA – Crystal Dunn (Mallory Pugh)        35th minute

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 5-Kelley O’Hara (9-Heather O’Reilly, 83), 8-Julie Johnston (6-Whitney Engen, 81), 4-Becky Sauerbrunn (capt.), 7-Meghan Klingenberg; 23-Allie Long, 12-Christen Press, 20-Lindsey Horan (10-Carli Lloyd, 46); 16-Crystal Dunn, 13-Alex Morgan (11-Ali Krieger, 68), 2-Mallory Pugh (3-Samantha Mewis, 87)
Subs not used: 21-Alyssa Naeher, 22-Emily Sonnett
Head Coach: Jill Ellis

RSA: 1-Roxanne Barker; 15-Refiloe Jane, 4-Noko Matlou, 5-Janine Van Wyk (capt.), 3-Nothando Vilakazi (19-Bambanani Mbane, 87); 20-Stephanie Malherbe, 21-Robyn Moodaly (18-Nompumelelo Nyandeni, 46), 2- Lebohang Ramalepe (17-Leandra Smeda, 56), 12-Jermaine Seoposenwe (11-Chrestinah Kgatlana, 80); 8-Linda Mothlalo (9-Amanda Dlamini, 61), 13-Octovia Nogwanya (14-Sanah Mollo, 24)
Subs not used:
16-Andile Dlamini, 23-Kaylin Swart, 6-Mamello Makhabane, 7-Nomathemba Ntsibande, 10-Silindile Ngubane, 22-Lebogang Mabatle
Head Coach:
Vera Pauw 

Stats Summary: USA / RSA
Shots: 18 / 4
Shots on Goal: 6 / 2
Saves: 2 / 4
Corner Kicks: 10 / 2
Fouls: 11 / 10
Offside: 2 / 2 

Misconduct Summary:
USA Meghan Klingenberg (caution)           84th minute
RSA – Nompumelelo Nyandeni (caution)       90+2

Officials:
Referee: Maria Serpas (SLV)
Assistant Referee 1: Elizabeth Aguilar (SLV)
Assistant Referee 2: Emperatriz Ayala (SLV)
4th Official: Sandra Arteaga (SLV) 

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Hope Solo

TRIVIA: How Well Do You Know Your WNT History vs. Australia?

As the U.S. Women’s National Team kicks off the U.S. Soccer Tournament of Nations against Australia on July 27 at CenturyLink Field in Seattle (7p.m. PT; ESPN), take our 8-question quiz centering around the WNT's extensive history against The Matildas:

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WNT Jul 25, 2017

THREE VIEWS: Howard, Altidore and Acosta Discuss Their Championship Experience

Playing in a Final is something special, and in soccer most players never even get the opportunity.

The current U.S. Men’s National Team roster that heads into Wednesday’s CONCACAF Gold Cup Final against Jamaica has a wide variety of experience in championship matches, and all have slightly different outlooks on what’s ahead against the Reggae Boyz.

One of the youngest members on the U.S. Gold Cup roster, Kellyn Acosta has played a big role in getting the MNT to Wednesday’s finale. The recently turned 22-year-old has appeared in four of the five matches and led all U.S. midfielders with 256 minutes played. Though he admitted to struggling early on in the tournament, Acosta’s performances have grown with every match, with his best coming in the USA’s 2-0 Semifinal win against Costa Rica.

“To be a part of this team going into the Gold Cup Final means everything,” he told ussoccer.com. “We put in a lot of work. We’ve been with each other for over a month, a ton of practices, traveling throughout the cities and we’ve just put a lot of effort into this. I know the guys and myself are excited for the opportunity. We’re going to give it our all and hopefully we can get the result.

While Wednesday’s game will be his first final with the U.S. Men’s National Team, Acosta has tasted victory in a championship match before, with the young midfielder anchoring the FC Dallas midfield in the club’s 4-2 win against New England Revolution to win the 2016 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. 

Experiencing his first professional final as a 21-year-old, Acosta recalled the mentality he took going into that match.

“It was to be just 100 percent concentrated. It’s a game where a lot of emotions can run around you. I’ve only played in so many finals in my career, so just to be a part of that was definitely chilling, but I was glad to be a part of it. I didn’t want to let the emotions overwhelm me. When I got in the game, I was a little nervous at first, a little anxious, and there was a lot of adrenaline. Once the game kicked off, I just eased my way into it and thought of it as another game. I think that’s the best approach. Obviously it’s a game with a lot of magnitude, but if you go out there and stick to things you know, do what you’ve been doing, then great things will happen.”

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With 38 goals, Jozy Altidore is the U.S. MNT’s third all-time leading scorer and his 16 goals in World Cup Qualifying place him second behind only Clint Dempsey. But when it’s come to featuring for the U.S. in tournaments, the striker has been marred by a series of hamstring injuries.

Since coming onto the National Team scene in late 2007, Altidore has missed out on playing a full tournament - due to injury or recovery - on four occasions. The list includes the hamstring ailment that occurred 19 minutes into the 2014 FIFA World Cup, leaving the 2011 and 2015 CONCACAF Gold Cups early and missing out all together on the USA’s run to the Semifinals of last summer’s Copa America Centenario.

While he’s appeared in a few club Finals – notably scoring in AZ Alkmaar’s 2-1 Dutch Cup win vs. PSV Eindhoven in 2013 and winning back-to-back Canadian Cups – Altidore has played in only one championship match all-time for the U.S. Men’s National Team: the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup Final, a difficult 3-2 defeat to Brazil.

“I’ve been unlucky with injuries, them being untimely, and so for me it means a lot to make it here,” Altidore told ussoccer.com. “I’ve had this tournament circled on my calendar for a lot of reasons, to get back playing with the National Team in a tournament and obviously to win something. It doesn’t come around often that you get these opportunities to win a trophy, so I’m really excited to be a part of the team. I think we have all the attributes, all the tools to make history.”

Altidore has enough experience playing against the Reggae Boyz to know they’re a team that can’t be taken lightly. The veteran forward was on the field for the USA’s first-ever defeat to Jamaica, a 2-1 World Cup Qualifying loss on Sept. 7, 2012 in Kingston. With Wednesday’s opponent already out of contention for next summer’s World Cup, Altidore believes the back-to-back Gold Cup Finalists will be as dangerous as ever.

“Jamaica, as well as in the last Gold Cup, did a good job in making the Final. I expect a tough team, a tough game – a hungry team. They’re not in the Hex, they can’t qualify for the World Cup, so this is essentially a World Cup game for them. It’s a huge game, a huge opportunity for them and their Federation to make strides, so we have to be ready for a really physical team, a fast team, one that’s athletic and a team that’s going to be playing with a chip on their shoulders.”

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At 38 years old, goalkeeper Tim Howard is the eldest member of the U.S. MNT’s Gold Cup roster and overall player pool. With 117 caps since 2002, Howard is as well-seasoned on the international scene as he is at the club level, having spent 13 combined seasons with Manchester United and Everton before returning to M.L.S. with Colorado Rapids last season.

“Any time you get an opportunity to play in a Final, you have to grab it with both hands,” Howard said. “You have to get that trophy because it will stick with you for a long, long time if you don’t. I’ve played in a lot of Finals in my career and haven’t won as many as I would have liked, so these moments don’t come very often – they’re important.”

Success in a final came early during his stay in England, backstopping Manchester United to a 3-0 win against Millwall in the 2003-04 FA Cup. He returned to the same match five years later with Everton, but the Blues fell 2-1 to Chelsea at Wembley Stadium.

Internationally, Howard tasted victory in one of the U.S. MNT’s biggest championship victories, defeating Mexico 2-1 in the 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup at Chicago’s Soldier Field.

“That’s the icing on the cake. Any time you win a Final, the rest of it is just pure elation. You get to celebrate with your teammates and coaching staff, your loyal, dedicated fans, family and friends – it’s just the ultimate. You put so much into the tournament and it’s just this sense of relief – you’ve got all this pent up energy and anxiety and you get an opportunity to express yourself finally and lift a trophy. You realize there is no more – it’s done, it’s finished. It’s a beautiful moment.”

He’s also faced bitter defeat in a U.S. shirt, serving as the goalkeeper in the 2009 Confederations Cup loss to Brazil and 2011 Gold Cup defeat to Mexico.

That 4-2 loss to El Trí was Howard’s last appearance in a Final at any level, and looking back he pulled no punches about the disappointment.

“Disappointing is an understatement,” Howard said about the 2011 defeat. “We got our butt kicked that day and it’s never easy. You work hard for something, you put in all your effort and you come out on the losing end, it’s a tough pill to swallow. I’ve never claimed to be a good loser, I hope I never am, but those days are tough.”

As the elder statesman on the U.S. team, Howard has plenty of advice for some of the younger players that may be experiencing their first championship match on Wednesday.

“I think it has to be a fine balance when you go into a Final. Mentally you have to be focused and understand what’s at stake. I think it’s important to have that heightened sense of anxiety and knowing what that moment means, but leaning on your experience to calm the nerves if that’s possible, play within yourself and not try and do too many crazy things individually. You have to collectively be a solid group and be focused.”

Given all that the U.S. team has been through since two defeats to start Final Round FIFA World Cup Qualifying last November and the return of Bruce Arena as U.S. MNT head coach, what would a win against Jamaica on Wednesday mean?

“It would be a feather in all our caps,” Howard said. “You want to be remembered as a winner, and you can only do that by producing the goods in the big moments. I think this team is ready for it.

“A few months ago we weren’t at this point. Teams go through ups and downs and changes ultimately have to be made, but it’s good to see that not only are we playing good football, which is clearly the most important thing, but it’s also that the camaraderie in this group is very good. There’s a big mix of old – very old in my case – and some good young guys. For us to all get along together and have one vision is a testament to not only the players, but Bruce Arena and his coaching staff.”

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MNT Jul 25, 2017

GALLERY: WNT Prepares for Tournament of Nations Opener in Seattle

The 2017 Tournament of Nations kicks off Thursday, July 27 as Australia, Brazil and Japan come to the United States for a competition that features four of the top teams in the world. The U.S. Women’s National Team will begin play against Australia at CenturyLink Field in Seattle (7p.m. PT; ESPN).


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WNT Jul 25, 2017

Cinco Cosas Sobre Jamaica

La Selección Masculina de Estados Unidos irá por su sexto campeonato regional cuando se enfrente a Jamaica en la Final de la Copa Oro CONCACAF 2017 el miércoles, 26 de julio en Levi's Stadium en Santa Clara, Calif.

Aquí hay cinco cosas que debes saber sobre el rival del miércoles.

El País, la Bandera y el Nombre del Equipo

Ubicado en el oeste del Mar Caribe, Jamaica está situado al sur de Cuba, oeste de Haití y sureste de las Islas Caimán. Con 2.7 millones de habitantes, es la quinta isla más poblada de la región.

La bandera de Jamaica fue adoptada el 6 de agosto, 1962, cuando la nación declaró su independencia de la Federación de las Indias Occidentales, protegida por el Reino Unido. Cada color tiene un significado. El negro representa la fuerza y creatividad de la gente que los ha permitido sobrepasar los obstáculos, el amarillo simboliza la riqueza del país y lo dorado de la luz del sol, y el verde por la vegetación de la isla.

El nombre de la selección es los "Reggae Boyz" en honor a que la isla es el lugar de nacimiento del género musical popular y a su artista más conocido Bob Marley, al quien también le gustaba jugar fútbol recreativamente. 

Historia Futbolística

Ahora un poder en la región caribeña de CONCACAF, el crecimiento de Jamaica empezó a finales de los años 1980, lo cual culminó con el primer campeonato mayor del país cuando elevó la Copa del Caribe 1991, un torneo que desde entonces ha ganado en seis ocasiones.

Hasta la fecha el mayor logro de los Reggae Boyz ha sido terminar en tercer lugar de la Ronda Final de Eliminatoria para la Copa Mundial de la FIFA Francia 1998, con el cual participaron por primera vez en el escenario más grande a nivel mundial. Mientras que cayoo en sus primeros dos partidos contra Croacia y Argentina, el conjunto que contaba con el actual director técnico de Jamaica, Theodore Whitmore, ganó su primer partido mundialista, derrotando a Japón 2-1 en su final de grupo.

No han clasificado a la Copa Mundial desde entonces y su suerte dentro de CONCACAF ha sido variada, con los Reggae Boyz solamente avanzando a la Ronda Final en el 2002 y el 2014.

A pesar de haber sido eliminado en la ronda semifinal durante este ciclo, Jamaica ha demostrado ser un rival capaz en la Copa Oro. En el 2015, vencoo a EE.UU. 2-1 camino a su primera Final del torneo y el domingo en la noche derrotaron a México 1-0, convirtiéndose en el primer país fuera de los dos poderes de CONCACAF en avanzar a finales consecutivas. 

Cómo Llegaron

Jamaica clasificó a su décima Copa Oro CONCACAF por la avanzar a las semifinales de la Copa del Caribe 2017, en donde terminó en segundo lugar detrás de Curaçao el mes pasado.

En la Copa Oro, Jamaica se vengó de Curaçao al derrotarlos 2-0 (9 de julio). Los Reggae Boyz luego pusieron a los demás en aviso con un empate de 0-0 contra México (13 de julio) antes de empatar 1-1 con El Salvador (16 de julio). En los cuartos de final, Jamaica venció a Canadá 2-1 (20 de julio), antes de su revancha contra México, en donde el gol de Kemar Lawrence en el minuto 88 en una jugada de balón parado mandó a los Reggae Boyz a la Final.

Historia vs. U.S. MNT

Desde su primer encuentro en 1988, la U.S. MNT mantiene un registro impresionante de 14-2-8 en 24 partidos contra Jamaica, con 11-1-3 en suelo estadounidense y 3-1-0 en la Copa Oro CONCACAF. La única derrota obviamente fue en la semifinal de la Copa Oro CONCACAF 2015, cuando Jamaica derrotó a Estados Unidos 2-1 para llegar a la Final del torneo por primera vez.

Así han terminado los últimos cuatro encuentros entre EE.UU. y Jamaica en Copas Oro.

Resultados de EE.UU. vs. Jamaica en Copas Oro

Fecha

Resultado

Goleadores de EE.UU.

Ronda

10 de julio, 1993

1-0 W

Wynalda

Etapa de Grupos

16 de julio, 2005

3-1 W

Beasley (2), Wolff

Cuartos de Final

19 de junio, 2011

2-0 W

J. Jones, Dempsey

Cuartos de Final

22 de julio, 2015

1-2 L

Bradley

Semifinal


La Nómina

Nueve jugadores en la nómina de Jamaica militan en la liga nacional, mientras que ocho juegan en la MLS y cuatro más en la United Soccer League de la Segunda División. Jamaica también tiene un jugador cada uno en Suecia y Serbia.

Hay muchas conexiones de compañeros entre los equipos. El mediocampista Darlington Nagbe juega con Darren Mattocks y Alvas Powell en los Portland Timbers, Chris Pontius juega con el portero Andrew Blake en el Philadelphia Union, los delanteros Clint Dempsey y Jordan Morris juegan a un lado de Oniel Fisher en Seattle Sounders FC, mientras que Juan Agudelo es compañero de Je-Vaughn Watson en el New England Revolution.

ARQUEROS (3): Andre Blake (Philadelphia Union/USA); Damion Hyatt (Arnett Gardens FC); Dwayne Miller (Valsta Syrianska IK/SWE)

DEFENSAS (9): Sergio Campbell (Pittsburgh Riverhounds/USA); Oniel Fisher (Seattle Sounders FC/USA); Shaun Francis (Montreal Impact/CAN), Rosario Harriott (Harbour View FC); Kemar Lawrence (New York Red Bulls/USA); Damion Lowe (Tampa Bay Rowdies/USA); Alvas Powell (Portland Timbers/USA); Ladale Richie (Montego Bay United FC); Jermaine Taylor (Minnesota United FC/USA)

MEDIOCAMPISTAS (5): Michael Binns (Portmore United FC); Ewan Grandison (Portmore United FC); Kevon Lambert (FK Vojvodina/SRB); Ricardo Morris (Portmore United FC); Je-Vaughn Watson (New England Revolution/USA)

DELANTEROS (6): Cory Burke (Bethlehem Steel FC/USA); Owayne Gordon (Montego Bay United FC); Jermaine Johnson (Tivoli Gardens FC); Darren Mattocks (Portland Timbers/USA); Shamar Nicholson (Boys' Town FC); Romario Williams (Charleston Battery/USA)

 

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Espanol Jul 25, 2017
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