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Christie Rampone

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Christie Rampone's Story - One Nation. One Team. 23 Stories.

Through eighteen years on the U.S. Women’s National Team, defender Christie Rampone has grown from a tremendously shy dual-sport athlete out of a small New Jersey school to the long-time captain of her country. Along the way she has learned from the many players and coaches who have graced the U.S. team over the past two decades. Rampone earned the monikers of Captain America and America’s #1 Soccer Mom while raising two daughters who have grown up around the team. She feels incredibly fortunate to have had so many great role models for Rylie and Reece, who are anything but shy.

Behind The Crest. Ep. 8 - #USWNT in Canada

The U.S. WNT wins the World Cup and celebrates with fans in this final episode of Behind the Crest from Canada. After a great win against Japan in Vancouver, the team goes on set at FOX, heads back to the USA to present the trophy to fans in Los Angeles and caps it off with a historic ticker tape parade in New York City.

Quotes: Ellis, Holiday, Heath, Lloyd, O'Reilly, Rapinoe and Rampone Exuberant About Fans at NYC Parade

U.S. Women’s National Team Head Coach JILL ELLIS

On the Ticker Tape Parade:
“I actually googled a ticker tape because I had never really seen one but today was unbelievable. I mean, I thought winning a World Cup was special but this was, it was mind-blowing today.”

On the experience of this week - winning a World Cup and going to New York:
“I’d say it’s top right now. I mean this and the World Cup together, hand-in-hand, what a week. It’s unbelievable. I can’t even say I’ve dreamed about it because there’s nothing like this I could have ever imagined.”

On being the first female team honored with a Ticker Tape Parade:
“I think it’s huge. I know that not many teams get honored this way and to be the first female team is very significant and very important for us and for females in sport.”

On her favorite part of the day:
“Just being on the float and actually looking into people’s faces and seeing how happy they were. It was unbelievable.”

WNT Celebrates World Cup Title in Los Angeles

The U.S. Women’s National Team celebrated its historic World Cup victory with 10,000 fans at LA LIVE in Los Angeles. Fresh from their 5-2 win against Japan on Sunday in Vancouver, the WNT landed in the USA and promptly shared the triumph with some of the #BestFansintheWorld. Now onto NYC for a ticker tape parade!

World Champions: USA Wins 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup

VANCOUVER, Canada (July 5, 2015) – The U.S. Women’s National Team defeated Japan 5-2 at BC Place on Sunday night to become the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Champion and the first three-time FIFA Women’s World Cup winner. 

In the first 16 minutes of play the USA took a 4-0 lead over Japan after Carli Lloyd netted the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history and Lauren Holiday added a goal to put the USA up by a wide margin. 

Japan ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak at 540 minutes by scoring in the 28th minute. The Asian nation built a bit of momentum early in the second half as Julie Johnston’s defensive clearance instead sent the ball into the USA’s net. However, Tobin Heath responded two minutes later to make it 5-2 and complete the highest scoring Final (seven goals) in FIFA Women’s World Cup history.

Loyd and goalkeeper Hope Solo were awarded the Golden Ball and Golden Glove, as the best player and the best goalkeeper at the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, respectively. It was the second straight Golden Glove award for Solo (she also won it in 2011) and the first for Lloyd. Lloyd became the second American to win the award, joining Carin Jennings, who won it in 1991. 

The USA is now the only country to win three Women’s World Cup and the country to score the most goals (five) in a WWC Final – no other team has scored more than two. 

The WNT will return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, respectively, before embarking on their nationwide celebration tour (details to be announced). 

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe), 3rd minute:
Playing a short corner kick on the ground, Megan Rapinoe sent a ball straight through several Japanese defenders to the middle of the six yard box. Carli Lloyd stormed from the back of the box to time her arrival with the ball perfectly and finished with a left-footed strike to score the fastest goal in FIFA Women’s World Cup Final history. USA 1, JPN 0 

USA – Carli Lloyd, 5th minute: Two minutes later, another set piece play led to a U.S. goal. Lauren Holiday stepped up to take the free kick from the right side of the box and sent a shot to the middle of the box that was flicked on by Julie Johnston through a forest of players before Carli Lloyd found it right in front of the net and tapped it in with the inside of her right foot for the second goal of the game and he fifth of the tournament. USA 2, JPN 0 

USA – Lauren Holiday, 14th minute: The sequence began with Tobin Heath, who sent a pass from the midfield intended for Alex Morgan but had the ball intercepted by Japanese defender Azusa Iwashimizu. Iwashimizu tried to head it out of danger but instead directed the ball up in the air. It came down right in front of Lauren Holiday, who volleyed it in stride with her right foot to net her first goal of the tournament. USA 3, JPN 0

USA – Carli Lloyd, 16th minute: Carli Lloyd intercepted the ball in midfield and touched it past a Japan player. Crossing the midfield line, she launched a shot that caught Japan goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori out of her net. While Kaihori got a hand to the ball, she could not keep it from bouncing off the post and into the back of the net, thus completing the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history. USA 4, JPN 0 

JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi), 28th minute: Nahomi Kawasumi played a great ball from the right channel, spotting teammate Yuki Ogimi inside the box. Ogimi evaded a challenge from Julie Johnston, swiveled around and sent a curling shot beyond the reach of Hope Solo for the Japan’s first goal of the match that ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak. USA 4, JPN 1

JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal), 52nd: Julie Johnston tried to clear a free kick attempt with a header that bounced across the face of goal and nestled inside the far post of Hope Solo’s net for Japan’s second score of the game. USA 4, JPN 2

USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian), 54th: Japan’s goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori  punched a Lauren Holiday corner kick clear to the right side. Kaihori’s punch wasn’t strong enough and the ball landed at Morgan Brian’s feet. Brian cut the ball back into the middle where Tobin Heath used the inside of her foot to one-time Brian’s perfect ball into the back of the net for the final score line. USA 5, JPN 2 (FINAL)

Next on the Schedule: The WNT return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Chattanooga, Tenn., respectively.
Broadcast information: FOX Sports 1 (Aug. 16), ESPN2 (Aug. 19)
Social: Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt@ussoccer_esp); FacebookInstagram

Milestone Watch:

  • The USA becomes the first country to win three FIFA Women’s World Cup titles.
  • Carli Lloyd is the first U.S. WNT player to score in four straight games in a World Cup. She netted a goal against China, Colombia and Germany and three against Japan.
  • Lloyd also became the first woman in a FIFA WWC to score a hat trick in a Final match and scored the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history.
  • Lloyd also became the third U.S. Woman to score a hat trick in WWC play: Carin Jennings Gabarra netted three goals against Germany in 1991 and Akers scored five against Chinese Taipei that same year.
  • Lloyd’s goal in the third minute was the fastest goal scored in a WWC Final game.
  • Lloyd scored both U.S. goals in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game (a 2-1 win over Japan), and the sole goal in the 2008 gold-medal game (1-0 over Brazil). With her three goals against Japan tonight, she became the first American to score in three major-tournament finals.
  • Midfielders Lauren Holiday and Tobin Heath each score their first goals of the tournament. It was Heath’s first goal in a Women’s World Cup.
  • The U.S. WNT finished this year’s tournament with a 34-4-5 all-time in Women’s World Cup play, outscoring its opponents 112-35 in 43 games. The 34 wins, 112 goals scored and the 43 games played are FIFA Women’s World Cup records.
  • With its five goals against Japan, the USA now holds the record for most goals scored in WWC play with 112 – the team scored 14 throughout the tournament. Germany scored 20 in Canada to finish in second with 111.
  • The USA’s five goals were the most any team has scored in a WWC Final. No other team has scored more than two.
  • The USA’s two goals in the first five minutes of the match against Japan was the first time any team scored twice in that span in a WWC game. 

Additional Notes:

  • The game was the third meeting between the USA and Japan in a major tournament Final. The USA now has a 2-0-1 record in those meetings: Wins in 2015 WWC and 2012 Olympics. Tie in 2011 WWC (1-3 PKs).
  • Lloyd leads the U.S. with eight goals in 2015.
  • While Wambach is the USA’s top scorer on the roster with 183 goals, Lloyd is next with 69 career international goals and Morgan has 52. Heather O’Reilly has scored 41.
  • Defender Becky Sauerbrunn is the only player on the roster to start and play every game for the USA in 2015. She has played the most minutes (1,509) of anyone on the team.
  • Five U.S. players played all 630 minutes of the tournament: defenders Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Sauerbrunn, midfielder Carli Lloyd, and goalkeeper Hope Solo.
  • In its last 17 games, the U.S. has surrendered just five goals and has scored 34.
  • Nineteen of the 20 field players on the World Cup roster saw action in the tournament.
  • Coming on as a sub in the second half, Wambach played in her 25th career WWC game, tied for second most all-time with Julie Foudy, Brigit Prinz and Formiga. Only Kristine Lilly has more (30).
  • Lloyd has sole possession of seventh place on the U.S. WNT’s all-time goal scoring list, passing Shannon MacMillan who scored 60 goals in her career. Lloyd, now with 69 goals, is the highest-scoring player in U.S. history who has played exclusively as a midfielder.
  • Hope Solo finished with 10 clean sheets in Women’s World Cup play, tying the record for most by a U.S. goalkeeper and most in World Cup play with Brianna Scurry.
  • Solo now has 136 goalkeeper wins and is the all-time leader in wins for a goalkeeper in U.S. history. Brian Scurry had 133 during her career (1994-2008).
  • Eleven players on the current USA roster have scored in a Women’s World Cup tournament: Tobin Heath, Wambach, Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday, Heather O’Reilly, Lori Chalupny, Shannon Boxx, Christen Press and Kelley O’Hara.
  • For the first time in FIFA WWC history, 24 nations participated at this year’s event, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams. 
  • Fourteen different players have scored for the USA in 2015: Tobin Heath, Lauren Holiday, Kelley O’Hara, Morgan, Wambach, Rodriguez, Press, Johnston, Klingenberg, Megan Rapinoe, Brian, Chalupny, Leroux and Lloyd. 

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
Date: July 5, 2015
Competition: 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Final
Venue: BC Place; Vancouver, Canada
Kickoff: 4 p.m. PT
Attendance: 53,341
Weather: Indoor Stadium

Scoring Summary:   1          2          F
USA                            4          1          5
JPN                             1          1          2

USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe)              3rd minute
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           5
USA – Lauren Holiday                                    14
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           16
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi)         27
JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal)                    52
USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian)               54

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (5-Kelley O’Hara, 61), 13-Alex Morgan (3-Christie Rampone, 86), 17-Tobin Heath (20-Abby Wambach, 79)
Subs Not Used: 2-Sydney Leroux, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny,18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press
Head coach: Jill Ellis
 

JPN: 18-Ayumi Kaihori; 3-Azusa Iwashimizu (10-Homare Sawa, 33), 4-Saki Kumagai, 5-Aya Sameshima, 6-Mizuho Sakaguchi, 8-aya Miyama (C), 9-Nahomi Kawasumi (15-Yuika Sugasawa, 39), 11-Shinobu Ohno (16-Mana Iwabuchi, 60), 13-Rumi Utsugi, 17-Yuki Ogimi, 19-Saori Ariyoshi
Subs Not Used: 1-Miho Fukumoto, 2-Yukari Kinga, 12-Megumi Kamionobe, 14-Asuna Tanaka, 20-Yuri Kawamura, 21-Erina Yamane, 22-Asano Nagasato, 23-Kana Kitahara, 7-Kozue Ando
Head Coach: Norio Sasaki

Stats Summary: USA / JPN
Shots: 15 / 12
Shots on Goal: 7 / 4
Saves: 3 / 2
Corner Kicks: 7 / 3
Fouls: 14 / 10
Offside: 1 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
JPN – Homare Sawa (caution)                      82nd minute
JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (caution)                     85

Officials:
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (UKR)
Assistant Referee 1: Natalia Rachynska (UKR)
Assistant Referee 2: Yolanda Parga (ESP)
Fourth Official: Claudia Umpierrez (URU)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Carli Lloyd

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SHY

Christie was shy; luckily, her sister Wendy was not. The two played together on the same high school soccer and basketball teams, and when reporters would come to talk to the team post-game, Wendy fielded the questions while Christy took off to hide on the bus. “When I did talk to them, I just said, ‘Mmm, yes,’ one word answers, and figured they’d stop asking me,” says Rampone. “I thought I expressed myself on the field. I didn’t know how to express myself verbally.”

Rampone (née Christie Pearce) stayed close to home for college, playing both basketball and soccer at Monmouth University, where her sister went to school. Rampone’s senior year soccer season had just ended, and she was on the bus to an away basketball game when her coach handed her a fax – an invite to the Women’s National Team.

Her shyness reached a whole new level when she arrived at her first camp, “Here I am with these people I’d only seen in commercials and in highlights,” says Rampone. She barely spoke. “It took me months before I could even say ‘Hi.’”

Christie Rampone

THE QUIET LEADER

When Pia Sundhage told Rampone that she had what it took to be the captain, her initial reaction was, ‘Me?!’ But then she took some time to digest it and decided she liked the challenge of leadership. 

Somewhat ironically, shyness has helped her be a better captain. “My personality is one that I listen, take it in, before I deliver,” says Rampone. “I’m not the one who’s going to blurt out what I think. And I got the chance to listen to Julie [Foudy], and Carla [Overbeck], to see them as captains and learn from them. That process – you watch, you observe. You learn about timing, approach and tone; knowing who you are talking to. Some people you can approach when you’re angry, some you can’t; you have to know the team.”

THE USWNT IMPACT

Christie Rampone

Rampone brings along her two kids – Rylie and Reece –on road trips, “They’ve seen the world, they get to see different personalities, and they connect with different personalities. They know how go to the meal room, pick out their own food, say hi to everyone. They learn how to adjust to a team,” says Rampone. “I love seeing how independent and vocal they are. They’re both so outgoing, whereas I was so shy, and I think this lifestyle has forced them to be more independent. I think Reece is naturally more like me, more shy, but she’s starting to become more outgoing, better at four than at 21 like her mom.”

Christie Rampone


U.S. National Team: A high-scoring forward in college, she converted to defender for the USA when she made her debut in 1997 ... Named captain of the U.S. Women’s National Team in 2008 … Is one of two players from a small soccer school ever to make an impact on the National Team ... Formerly Christie Pearce, she switched the back of her jersey to her married name in 2004 … After the retirement of Kristine Lilly in 2010, she became the most capped player on the U.S. team and the only active player remaining from the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup championship team … Currently the most capped active player in the world and during 2014, she became the second player in world history – joining Kristine Lilly – to reach 300 caps … Could pass 25,000 minutes played in a U.S. uniform in 2015.

2015: 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Champion... Named to the 2015 U.S. FIFA Women's World Cup roster, her fifth World Cup selection (1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)... Became the oldest player to appear in a World Cup match when she entered the final group stage game against Nigeria on June 16... Saw her first bit of action of 2015 coming in as a second half sub during the USA's 5-1 against Mexico on May 17 in the second game of the Send-Off Series...Suffered a back injury in January camp that sidelined her for the beginning of the year... Added to the Algarve Cup roster on March 8 after teammate Whitney Engen suffered a hamstring injury during training in Portugal... Part of the team that defeated France 2-0 on March 11 to win the USA's 10th Algarve Cup title... 2014: Played in 17 games, starting 14 and logged the fifth-most minutes on the team with 1,328 while captaining the team for the seventh year … Played every minute of four matches as she helped the USA qualify for the 2015 FIFA World Cup as the USA won the 2014 CONCACAF Women’s Championship …  Earned her 300th cap during a 3-0 semifinal victory against Mexico on Oct. 24 to help the team advance to the championship game and earn a berth to the Women’s World Cup … 2013: Played in 11 games, starting 10 … Had one assist to up her career total to 12 … 2012: One of three U.S. players to play in all 32 matches, starting 31 … Has two assists during the year … Captained the USA to its third consecutive Olympic gold medal … Played in her fourth Olympics, most of any U.S. player … One of three U.S. players to play every minute of all six games at the Olympics … Also played every minute of all five games at the CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying tournament as the USA won the regional title in Vancouver, Canada … During 2012, she passed Julie Foudy and Mia Hamm to become the second most-capped player in U.S. and world history … 2011: Once again anchored the U.S. back line from her center back position, starting all 18 games she played while finishing third on the team in minutes played with 1,590 … Played in her fourth Women’s World Cup, joining just four other U.S. players to have accomplished that feat … She was the most capped player in the Women’s World Cup and ended the year with 244 games played, good for fourth all-time in U.S. history … Started all six games in Germany and was one of four players to play every minute … The Women’s World Cup was her seventh world championship for the USA …2010: Gave birth to her second child, Reece, on March 6 and played her first club match exactly three months later on June 6 … Made her return to the U.S. lineup July 17, coming off the bench against Sweden in East Hartford, Conn., and slotted back into the starting lineup after that … Played 10 total games for the USA, starting nine, including all five at the CONCACAF Women’s World Cup Qualifying tournament, where she played every minute … Also played every minute of both legs of the Women’s World Cup playoff against Italy …. 2009: Played every minute of all five matches she started before taking a break at the end of the summer due to her pregnancy … 2008: Earned her 200th cap against New Zealand in the final first-round match at the 2008 Olympics, becoming the sixth U.S. player to hit the 200-cap mark … Had a stellar year at center back captaining the National Team, starting all 35 matches in which she played and setting a U.S. record for minutes played in a calendar year at 3,066 … She was the first player ever to play more than 3,000 minutes in a year … Missed some training time after recovering from surgery to remove her gall bladder in May but did not miss any game action … Started all six games at the 2008 Olympics, playing every minute, to help the USA to the gold medal … 2007: Started all 20 games in which she played, playing all but 59 minutes of those games … Was the most-capped defender and second most-capped player on the 2007 Women’s World Cup team … Started all six games of the Women’s World Cup, her third WWC tournament, but the first time she had played in every match of the competition … 2006: Made her return to the National Team and played against Norway at the Four Nations Tournament in China just 112 days after having a baby … Played in 20 games, starting 17 … 2005: Took the year off to have her first child, Rylie Rampone, who was born Sept. 29 … 2004: Had a stellar year for the USA, starting 26 of the 28 matches she played, including every minute of the five matches in which she appeared at the 2004 Olympics ... 2003: Continued her steady play after making a complete comeback from ACL surgery, starting 15 of the 17 games in which she played … Started all four Women’s World Cup matches in which she played, playing every minute of those games … Became the 15th U.S. player to earn 100 caps when she played against Brazil on July 13 in New Orleans … She captained the USA for the first time in that match … 2002: Called into two training camps but did not play for the USA while recovering from ACL surgery … 2001: Played in four matches for the USA during a limited schedule, starting two … Missed the 2001 Nike U.S. Women’s Cup after tearing her right ACL while playing for the New York Power … 2000: Was one of the USA’s most consistent players, earning the starting spot at right back … In a breakout year, she started 30 of the 33 matches in which she played, including all five games at the Olympics and played 2,540 minutes … Scored two of her four career goals, both against Iceland on April 5, in Davidson, N.C. … 1999: A member of the 1999 Women’s World Cup championship team, she played in one match against Korea DPR ... The versatile defender played in 18 matches for the USA in 1999, starting eight ... 1998: Solidified her position as a solid starter in the defense, starting 14 of her 19 matches ... Started both matches as the USA took the gold medal at the 1998 Goodwill Games ... 1997: Started 16 of 18 games for the USA in 1997, her first year with the National Team, finishing third on the team in minutes played ... First trained with the USA at training camp in San Diego in January ... Traveled with the USA to Australia in February of 1997, making her debut against the Matildas on Feb. 28 in Melbourne ... Played the second half in Melbourne, then all 180 minutes of matches in Bathurst and Canberra, and her international career was off and running ... Played right midfield in all three games at Nike U.S. Cup 1997, scoring the 100th U.S. Women’s Cup goal against Australia in Ambler, Pa. ... First Appearance: Feb. 28, 1997, vs. Australia ... First Goal: May 2, 1997, vs. Korea Rep.

Professional / Club – 2014: Played 1,165 minutes in 19 games for Sky Blue FC, starting 18 … Scored a goal and had two assists … Was named to the NWSL Best XI First Team at the age of 39 … 2013: Allocated to her home state Sky Blue FC for the inaugural NWSL season and played every minute of the 20 games she started while leading the club to a playoff berth … At the age of 38, she was named to the NWSL Best XI … 2011: Signed with magicJack for the 2011 WPS season and played every minute of all 11 games she played in helping the club to a playoff berth … Had one assist … 2010: Played in 16 matches for Sky Blue, starting 14 … Named as a WPS All-Star Game reserve … 2009: Allocated to Sky Blue in her home state of New Jersey for the inaugural WPS season in 2009 … She helped lead underdog Sky Blue to the inaugural WPS championship, taking over as head coach with two games left during what was a tumultuous regular season and leading the team to one regular season win, the final playoff berth and three dramatic road wins in the playoffs to claim the title … Missed a few games early in the WPS season due to injury but ended up starting 14 games and was a WPS All-Star, starting in the All-Star Game … Named the WPS Sportswoman of the Year … Played a key role in shutting out a powerful Los Angeles Sol attack in the 1-0 WPS title game victory, all while almost three months pregnant … 2003:With the New York Power of the WUSA, started and played every minute of 18 matches, recording one assist … 2002: Recovered from ACL surgery at the end of the 2001 season to play 1,699 minutes over 19 matches, all of which she started … 2001: Was a founding player in the WUSA for the New York Power … Helped lead the Power to the WUSA playoffs before tearing her ACL just two minutes into the third to last match of the regular season … Started 18 matches for the Power and played every minute until her injury … 1998: Played several matches for the New Jersey Stallions of the W-League during the summer of 1998 … Youth club: Played youth club with the Twin County Saints.


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