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Sermanni Names U.S. WNT Roster for Matches Against Canada and Russia

CHICAGO (Jan. 24, 2014) – U.S. Women’s National Team head coach Tom Sermanni has named a roster of 24 players for a three-game, three-week road trip as the USA opens its 2014 schedule.

The USA will play its first match of year on Jan. 31 against Canada at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas (8 p.m. CT on FOX Sports 1). The team then travels to Florida to face Russia on Feb. 8 at FAU Stadium in Boca Raton (3:30 p.m. ET on ussoccer.com web stream), followed by a quick trip to Atlanta to play Russia again on Feb. 12 at the Georgia Dome (7:30 p.m. ET on ussoccer.com web stream). Sermanni will name 18 players to suit up for each of the matches.

“The players and staff are looking forward to playing matches,” said Sermanni. “We had productive training camps in December and January, but having three games in less than two weeks is a great opportunity for these players to continue to show their growth as individuals and as a team. This is the start of a year in which competition for places becomes much more critical, as does team performance and results.”

All the players named to this roster participated in the USA’s early January camp at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson, Calif. With the exceptions of forward Alex Morgan and midfielder Tobin Heath, both of whom are still recovering from injuries, the USA will bring its full complement of regulars into these first matches of the year.

The roster includes the first and third overall picks in the 2014 NWSL College Draft with defender Crystal Dunn going No. 1 to the Washington Freedom and midfielder Julie Johnston at No. 3 to the Chicago Red Stars.

Sermanni also gave a first roster spot to rising UCLA senior Samantha Mewis, who helped the Bruins to the NCAA title last fall. The 6-foot-tall Samantha is the younger sister of current U.S. WNT defender Kristie Mewis.

The Mewis sisters played together on both the 2008 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup Team and the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup Team, but this is first time they are on a full U.S. Women’s National Team roster together. The younger Mewis trained with the USA for a few days at the end of the January camp in Los Angeles.

The series of matches also marks the first that will see defender Rachel Buehler switch to her married name on the back of her jersey. Buehler, who was married in November of 2012, will now go by Rachel Van Hollebeke (pronounced “van HALL-ah-beck”).

U.S. Women's National Team Roster By Position – Detailed Roster
GOALKEEPERS (3): Nicole Barnhart (FC Kansas City), Jill Loyden (Sky Blue FC), Hope Solo (Seattle Reign FC)
DEFENDERS (9): Stephanie Cox (Seattle Reign FC), Crystal Dunn (Washington Spirit), Whitney Engen (Tyresö), Ali Krieger (Washington Spirit), Kristie Mewis (Boston Breakers), Kelley O’Hara (Sky Blue FC), Christie Rampone (Sky Blue FC), Becky Sauerbrunn (FC Kansas City), Rachel Van Hollebeke (Portland Thorns FC)
MIDFIELDERS (8): Morgan Brian (Virginia), Lauren Holiday (FC Kansas City), Julie Johnston (Chicago Red Stars), Carli Lloyd (WNY Flash), Samantha Mewis (UCLA), Heather O’Reilly (Boston Breakers), Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign FC), Erika Tymrak (FC Kansas City)
FORWARDS (4): Sydney Leroux (Seattle Reign FC), Christen Press (Tyresö), Amy Rodriguez (FC Kansas City), Abby Wambach (WNY Flash)

Additional Notes:

  • The 2014 schedule begins with the 51st meeting between the USA and Canada. The USA is 42-3-5 all-time against the host of the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup.
  • Seventeen players on the training camp roster played in the NWSL last season. Twenty-two of the 24 players have committed to play in the league during its second season in 2014.
  • It was announced this week that Megan Rapinoe has ended her tenure with French club Lyon and will be available to play for Seattle Reign FC for the entire NWSL season.
  • Three players on the roster were new allocations to NWSL clubs for the upcoming season: Stephanie Cox (Seattle Reign FC), Whitney Engen (Houston Dash) and Christen Press (Chicago Red Stars).
  • All nine NWSL clubs are represented on the roster. FC Kansas City has the most players with five.
  • Since taking over as the U.S. Women’s National Team head coach in January of 2013, Tom Sermanni has seen 44 players called in to at least one training camp. Of those 44 players, 32 have earned at least one cap.
  • Sermanni has thus far also given 10 players their first caps.
  • After Abby Wambach, who has 163 career goals, midfielder Carli Lloyd is the top scorer on the roster with 46 career international goals, followed by Heather O’Reilly with 37.
  • Wambach finished second in the voting for the 2013 FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year after winning the award for 2012.
  • 2012 Olympic gold medalist Kelley O’Hara, who was a late addition to the January camp roster, could return to game action for the first time since April 9, 2013, when she started against the Netherlands in The Hague.
  • The call-up of both Mewis sisters – Kristie and Samantha – marks the first time sisters have played together on the full U.S. Women’s National Team since 1998, when identical twins Lorrie (120 career caps) and Ronnie Fair (3 caps) played together.
  • Alex Morgan will be with the U.S. team for a few days during the middle of the trip, but only for rehabilitation and evaluation purposes as she continues to come back from her ankle injury.
  • Tobin Heath, who is currently in France with her club Paris Saint-Germain, is progressing well with her recovery from a foot injury but is not ready yet for National Team action.
  • The roster also includes the winner of the 2013 MAC Hermann Trophy as college soccer’s top player in University of Virginia senior Morgan Brian.


2013 Athlete of the Year Voting Kicks off U.S. Soccer Awards Season

CHICAGO (Nov. 19, 2013) – U.S. Soccer has announced the opening of polls for the 2013 Athlete of the Year awards. Fans can vote for the finalists in five categories – Male, Female, Young Male, Young Female and Disabled Athletes of the Year – on ussoccer.com throughout the week. The winners will be announced Tuesday, Nov. 26.

The opening of the Athlete of the Year ballot kicks off a busy awards season for U.S. Soccer. In December, the Best of U.S. Soccer: #100Years Edition will ask fans to select their favorite moment from the past 100 years in a fun, bracket-style competition. U.S. Soccer will also name an All-Time Best XI for the Men’s and Women’s National Teams as the Centennial year draws to a close.

The U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year awards are the oldest and most prestigious awards of their kind, dating back to 1984 for the men and 1985 for the women, while the Young Male and Young Female awards were added in 1998. This is the second year U.S. Soccer will name a Disabled Athlete of the Year.

Two previous winners are included in the Male Athlete of the Year finalists: goalkeeper Tim Howard (2008) and forward Clint Dempsey (2007, 2011 and 2012). This is Michael Bradley’s fifth nomination for the award and Jozy Altidore’s second. Both are former winners of the Young Male Athlete of the Year Award (Altidore in 2006, Bradley in 2007). This is the first nomination for defender DaMarcus Beasley since 2007, when he was nominated as a midfielder.

The list of Female Athlete of the Year finalists features three previous winners: midfielder Carli Lloyd (2008), forward Abby Wambach (2003, 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2011) and last year’s winner Alex Morgan. These past winners are joined by first-time nominees, forwards Christen Press and Sydney Leroux, and NWSL MVP Lauren Holiday, who was also nominated in 2011.

Previous Young Female Athlete of the Year nominees Morgan Brian (2010 and 2011) and Crystal Dunn (2010 and 2012), both of whom debuted for the full WNT this year, are joined by first-time nominees Cari Roccaro, a defender for the U.S. U-20 WNT, U-20 and full WNT forward Lindsey Horan and 15-year-old Mallory Pugh.

Defender Shaquell Moore earns his second straight Young Male Athlete of the Year nomination. Midfielder Wil Trapp and defenders Kellyn Acosta, Shane O’Neill and Erik Palmer-Brown all earn their first nominations for the award. Nominees must be age eligible for any of the Youth National Teams and can only win the award once in his career. Forward Rubio Rubin was the 2012 U.S. Soccer Young Male Athlete of the Year.

U.S. Soccer will also name a Disabled Athlete of the Year, which honors the achievement of disabled soccer players in the United States. This is the second year for the award, which began in 2012.

Online votes for the Athlete of the Year awards are equivalent to 50 percent of the total votes. As in years past, the other 50 percent will be represented by votes compiled from members of the national media and U.S. Soccer representatives (from National Team coaches to the National Board of Directors).

U.S. Soccer Male Athlete of the Year Finalists
Jozy Altidore, Forward
DaMarcus Beasley, Defender
Michael Bradley, Midfielder
Clint Dempsey, Forward
Tim Howard, Goalkeeper

U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year Finalists
Lauren Holiday, Midfielder
Sydney Leroux, Forward
Carli Lloyd, Midfielder
Alex Morgan, Forward
Christen Press, Forward
Abby Wambach, Forward

U.S. Soccer Young Male Athlete of the Year Finalists
Kellyn Acosta, Defender
Shaquell Moore, Defender
Shane O’Neill, Defender
Erik Palmer-Brown, Defender
Wil Trapp, Midfielder

U.S. Soccer Young Female Athlete of the Year Finalists
Morgan Brian, Midfielder
Crystal Dunn, Defender
Lindsey Horan, Forward
Mallory Pugh, Midfielder
Cari Roccaro, Defender

U.S. Soccer Disabled Athlete of the Year Finalists
Lexi Heer, Power Soccer
Meghan Maiwald, Deaf Soccer
Rene Renteria, Paralympic Soccer

U.S. WNT Players Abby Wambach, Alex Morgan and Crystal Dunn Up for 2013 ESPY Awards

CHICAGO (July 15, 2013) – Three U.S. Women’s National Team players are up for 2013 ESPY Awards, which will be given out on Wednesday night in Los Angeles during a star-studded event at Nokia Theatre L.A. LIVE.

Fans can vote for Abby Wambach, Alex Morgan and Crystal Dunn at http://espn.go.com/espys/2013/. Voting is open until 9 p.m. ET on Wednesday, July 17.

U.S. forward Abby Wambach, who broke Mia Hamm’s all-time international scoring record on June 20 when she found the net four times against the Korea Republic at Red Bull Arena in Harrison, N.J., is appropriately up for Best Record-Breaking Performance. Heading into the match needing two goals to tie Hamm’s career mark at 158 and three goals to beat it, Wambach scored four times before halftime and currently sits as the top scorer in the history of international soccer with 160 goals.

Wambach will be in some distinguished company. Also up for the award are New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, who set the NFL record for consecutive games with a touchdown pass, Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson, who set the NFL record for receiving yards in a season and the most decorated athlete in Olympic history in swimmer Michael Phelps.

U.S. forward Alex Morgan is up for Best Moment for her stunning 123rd minute game-winning header against Canada in the semifinal of the 2012 Olympics. Morgan scored off a cross from Heather O’Reilly, giving the USA a 4-3 victory in a match in which it had trailed three times and tallying the latest goal ever scored in a FIFA competition. It came just seconds before the final whistle and sent the Americans to the gold medal game, where they defeated Japan 2-1 in front of more than 80,000 fans at London’s Wembley Stadium on two goals from Carli Lloyd.

Morgan was nominated last year for Best Breakthrough Athlete for her performance at the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup in which she became the first U.S. player to score in the semifinal and final.

Also in Morgan’s category this year are Jack Hoffman, a seven-year-old cancer survivor who ran for a touchdown in the Nebraska football spring game, tennis star Andy Murray, who delighted all of Great Britain by becoming the first British man in 77 years to win Wimbledon and Indianapolis Colts head coach Bruce Pagano, who returned the NFL sideline after undergoing treatment for cancer. Morgan will also be a presenter during the awards ceremony.

Young U.S. defender Crystal Dunn is up for Best Female College Athlete. It’s been quite a year for Dunn, who played a key role in helping the USA win the 2012 FIFA Under-20 Women’s World Cup in Japan last fall – assisting on the winning goal in the quarterfinal and final -- then helped the University of North Carolina win the NCAA title and won the Hermann Trophy as college soccer’s best player. She made her full Women’s National Team debut in February against Scotland in Nashville, Tenn. and has since earned six total caps with four starts.

Dunn is up against her classmate Kara Cannizzaro, who led UNC to the 2013 NCAA lacrosse title, as well as Baylor basketball legend Brittney Griner and Oklahoma softball pitcher Keilani Ricketts.

2013 ESPY Awards Nominations
Best Record-Breaking Performance – Abby Wambach
Best Moment – Alex Morgan
Best Female College Athlete – Crystal Dunn

U.S. WNT vs. Korea Republic: Post-Match Quotes - June 20, 2013

U.S. Women's National Team vs. Korea Republic: Quote Sheet
International Friendly
June 20, 2013

U.S. Women’s National Team Head Coach TOM SERMANNI
On the match versus Korea Republic:
“I am delighted for the performance tonight because I thought we worked on some stuff from the last game that we felt we didn’t do that well and we immediately rectified that tonight. I thought we pressured Korea exceptionally well and kept the ball in their half. I thought some of our combination play was outstanding, but overall, tonight was the kind of performance that I expect from a U.S. National Team. I was really delighted.”

On Abby Wambach’s record breaking night:
“It was a fairy tale night. She couldn’t have done it any better, just fantastic. You know she’s a great professional, she’s in great shape and you know, she was really determined tonight to go out there and break that record and she did it in great style.”

U.S. WNT forward ABBY WAMBACH

On her record setting performance:
“It’s special, not only because I could tell my teammates were trying to get me those goals in the first half, but my family was here, it was a great crowd, and a great team performance. I can’t say how much I look up to Mia [Hamm] and how amazing the record that she set was. My teammates have put me in all different kinds of positions to score goals, and I can’t say it enough, and I really through and through believe it in my heart that I’m only as good as my teammates allow me to be. And yes, I score a lot of goals, and yes, I put myself in position to score goals, but they do, too. I can’t thank my teammates enough. It’s a special night.”

On the future:
“Well, I’ve never really been focused on breaking the record, truthfully. For me, it’s getting my body to 100 percent physical health and fitness so I can be performing at my peak in 2015 for Canada. Of course we have to qualify to get to Canada first. For me, my focus and my goal is winning that World Cup.”

On Alex Morgan and her own role on the team:
“Alex is going to score tons of goals in the next few years and I think we have such a different kind of strength. When I’m having a great game she’s probably going to be on the assisting end of things. But I want to be putting her in position to score goals because my legs can’t move like hers and she can score goals in such random positions like she did in the Canada game. She’s going to be a threat for us; she’s going to be scoring the bulk of the goals for our team over the next couple of years. So, if my role becomes the assister, great. If I’m the set piece threat, fine. Whatever my role is to help this team win a World Cup title that’s all I care about.”

U.S. WNT midfielder MEGAN RAPINOE
On Abby Wambach breaking Mia Hamm’s record:
“Wow. I can’t even believe it. I didn’t think that she was going to have a hat trick tonight, to be honest and to do it sort of close to her home with all of her family here and everything, unbelievable. Four goals in the first half is ridiculous.”

On her assisting on Abby Wambach’s third and record-breaking goal:
“Well she was on two (goals) at that point so obviously ‘score’ went through my head. I just put in a good cross and let her get up there and try to do something…I think Abby is more of a focal point on set pieces anyway, so definitely on that one I was just trying to put something in the area and she loves to go get it.”

U.S. WNT forward ALEX MORGAN
On Abby Wambach’s record breaking night:
“Scoring with her head, with her feet, it doesn’t matter what it is. We definitely thought that this could be the game or it could be in five games, who knows, but we were ready for it and once she got that first goal we knew it was her game. We knew this was going to be the one.”

On Abby Wambach’s fourth goal, which she assisted:
“On that goal, Abby was feeling it. It was on my right foot and I knew that if I passed it, it was either going in off of her or off of a defender. So, knowing that that was the best scoring chance, I laid it off for her. I’m just so happy for her because she’s just been saying to everyone that she wants it to be done and over with and she scores four goals to [break] Mia’s record.”

U.S. WNT defender CHRISTIE RAMPONE
On Abby Wambach’s performance:
“I think she had her mind set that she wanted to do it tonight. She had three goals in less than 30 minutes. It was an amazing performance by her. It’s the best of both worlds, to score four goals and to watch the rest of the game and enjoy the day.”

On being a part of both Mia Hamm’s and Abby Wambach’s record breaking nights:
“I just remember us rushing the field for Mia and it was amazing to do that for Abby as well. I’m very lucky to be a part of both. They are both special and amazing people in my career. I’m just lucky to have been around both of them.”

U.S. WNT defender CRYSTAL DUNN
Her reaction to the night:
“I felt like I was a part of history tonight. Abby’s four goals, that was amazing to be on the field with her. She’s been so supportive of me coming into this camp and training with these girls who I’ve looked up to for so long. I feel like it’s been an amazing night. The crowd was amazing and just being on the field was great.”

On the celebration after the record-breaking goal:
“All of a sudden she started running and we started running; all of the emotions were just there. It’s just awesome being on the field with her. I look up to her as a player and just as a person, too. I think she’s amazing in every aspect.”

On Wambach as a leader:
“She has a positive tone. Just her being an amazing player she can easily be cocky or conceited but she’s not like that at all. She’s very supportive. If I make a mistake in training, she’s right there to pick me up and make me feel good about myself being in this camp. It’s very stressful obviously playing with the best players in the world and if you make a mistake on the field, she’s always the first one picking me up, making me feel better. I look up to her.”

What's In A Name?

In soccer, everyone’s got a nickname, right? It’s just that the game happens so fast. As a player, you need a name that all your teammates can get out quickly and easily. Some nicknames are used only within the confines of the team while others have been adopted by fans and media.

On the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team, the nicknames fall into many different categories.

Some players rarely, if ever, hear their given names. We can’t remember the last time someone used Nicole Barnhart’s first name. She’s always “Barnie.” (Unless an occasion arises when someone pulls out “Barnyard” or “Barnacles,” which actually happens more than you might think).

Likewise for Shannon Boxx as 99.9 percent of the time it’s just “Boxxy.” We’re pretty sure she might not even respond to Shannon. Kristie Mewis is “Mew” or “Mewie” and Meghan Klingenberg is of course “Klingy.”

But nicknames are not just adding about adding a “y” or an “ie” to someone’s name. Sometimes it’s initials. Heather Ann O’Reilly has long been known as “HAO” (pronounced hey-oh). Sometime “HAO” calls Kelley O’Hara “KO.” Christen Press is sometimes “CP.” Young goalkeeper Adrianna Franch is “AD.”

(Side note: New U.S. head coach Tom Sermanni did call O’Reilly “Hailey” a few times in his first week of camp -- a combination of HAO and O’Reilly -- but that doesn’t really count as a nickname. He quickly corrected himself.)

Nicknames can be maiden names as well. Christie Rampone hasn’t been Christie Pearce for years, but her teammates still often call her “Pearcie,” proving that nicknames can stick around a while.

Some nicknames are more connected to a style of play. One of the best ever is “The Buehldozer” for Rachel Buehler (sometimes shortened to just “‘Dozer”), whose propensity for plowing through opponents earned her that moniker. Alex Morgan rose to international soccer fame with a nickname that seemed a perfect fit for her galloping running style and youthful exuberance: “Baby Horse.” While it’s still a popular nickname with the fans and on Twitter, her teammates rarely use it nowadays. As Megan Rapinoe said during the 2012 Olympics, “I think she’s definitely a stallion now.”

Many times, you just shorten it up. Carli Lloyd is “Car.” Megan Rapinoe is “Pinoe.” Ashlyn Harris is “Ash.” Crystal Dunn is “Cris” and Sydney Leroux is “Syd” (you can add “the Kid” if you like). Becky Sauerbrunn is “Becks,” or one that has become very popular on the U.S. team: “Reba.” (Yes, her real name is Rebecca).

Julie Johnston is “Jules” or “JJ,” and Lauren Cheney is “Chens” (pronounced Chains). Whitney Engen is “Whit,” Tobin Heath is “Tobes” and Ali Krieger is “Kriegs.” Her club teammates in Germany called her “Warrior Princess” (Krieger means warrior in German), but that’s a whole other story.

Yael Averbuch has one of the most fun nicknames on the team. You can call her “Ya-Ya.”

However, some players just don’t have nicknames. While in reality Jill is a nickname for Jillian, don’t call Jill Loyden “Jilly” (although U.S. goalkeeper coach Paul Rogers sometimes does).

Hope Solo is usually just Hope. Both her names are so cool that she doesn’t need a nickname.

And Abby Wambach is almost always Abby. Of course, when you’ve scored 154 career goals, you can go by one name. There is that rare occasion -- and this does happen -- that someone decides to use her real name: Mary Abigail. We’re not sure why it’s always funny when someone calls her “Mary” or “Abigail,” but it just is.

Voting Begins for 2012 Female and Young Female Athlete of the Year Awards

CHICAGO (Nov. 26, 2012) – U.S. Soccer has announced the opening of polls for the 2012 Female and Young Female Athlete of the Year awards. Fans can vote for finalists in each category on U.S. Soccer’s Facebook page throughout the week. The winners will be announced Monday, Dec. 3.

Vote Now on U.S. Soccer’s Official Page on Facebook
• Read ussoccer.com Bios Athlete of the Year Nominees: Female | Young Female

The list of Female Athlete of the Year finalists includes three previous winners: midfielder Carli Lloyd (2008), goalkeeper Hope Solo (2009) and Abby Wambach (2003, 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2011). The past winners are joined by first-time nominees midfielder Megan Rapinoe and forward Alex Morgan.

Goalkeeper Jane Campbell, midfielder Vanessa DiBernardo, defender Crystal Dunn, defender Julie Johnston and forward Kealia Ohai all earn their first nominations for Young Female Athlete of the Year. Nominees must be age eligible for any of the Youth National Teams and can only win the award once in their career.

The U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year awards are the oldest and most prestigious awards of their kind, dating back to 1984 for the men and 1985 for the women, while the Young Male and Young Female awards were added in 1998. This was the first year U.S. Soccer named a Disabled Athlete of the Year.

Earlier this month Clint Dempsey was named 2012 Male Athlete of the Year and Rubio Rubin named Young Male Athlete of the Year. Felicia Schroeder earned the 2012 Disabled Athlete of the Year award.

Online votes for the Athlete of the Year awards are equivalent to 50 percent of the total votes. As in years past, the other 50 percent will be represented by votes compiled from members of the national media and U.S. Soccer representatives (from National Team coaches to the National Board of Directors).

U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year Finalists
Carli Lloyd, Midfielder
Alex Morgan, Forward
Megan Rapinoe, Midfielder
Hope Solo, Goalkeeper
Abby Wambach, Forward

U.S. Soccer Young Female Athlete of the Year Finalists
Jane Campbell, Goalkeeper
Vanessa DiBernardo, Midfielder
Crystal Dunn, Defender
Julie Johnston, Defender
Kealia Ohai, Forward


A key member of the U.S. team that won the 2012 FIFA Under-20 Women’s World Cup title in Japan … She played every minute of all six matches and registered two huge assists from right back, setting up Chioma Ubogagu’s game-winning overtime goal in the 2-1 quarterfinal victory against Korea DPR and Kealia Ohai’s game-winner in the historic 1-0 victory against Germany in the championship game … During the Women’s World Cup, she helped shut down several of the top U-20 attackers in the world with inspired play at outside back … Played four out of the five games at the CONCACAF Women’s World Cup qualifying tournament – playing every minute of those four matches – and picked up three assists in the tournament as the USA won the regional title … Finished her U-20 career as one of the most capped players at that level with 39 games played … She played two cycles with the U-20s after also representing the USA at the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Germany … A member of the team that won the 2012 CONCACAF Under-20 Women’s Championship and earned a berth to the 2012 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Japan … Played every minute of all four games she started at qualifying, totaling 360 … Had three assists in the tournament … A member of the U.S. team that won the 2010 CONACAF U-20 Women’s Championships in Guatemala to earn a berth to the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup … She played every minute of all five games, one of just two players to do so … Played every minute of all four games at the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Germany at center-back First U-20 WNT camp was in January of 2009 … Played in 16 total matches for the U-20s in 2010 heading into U-20 Women’s World Cup, including 14 international matches … Played outside back for the U.S. U-17s in 2008, but has moved to center-back for the U-20s … One of the USA’s best players at the 2008 FIFA U-17 Women’s World in New Zealand, she recovered from an illness early in the tournament to play every minute of four games … Finished her U-17 career with 13 caps and one goal, but it was a huge stoppage time score that put the USA in the Women’s World Cup with a 1-0 victory over Mexico in the semifinal of the 2008 CONCACAF U-17 Women’s Championships in T&T … Brought into the U-17 program in 2008 and played almost every match for the team that year … One of the three players born in 1993 to make the Women’s World Cup roster … One of two players to start all five games and play every minute of the CONCACAF U-17 Women’s Qualifying tournament … Attended the U.S. Soccer Under-14 I.D. Camp in 2006. First cap: None. First goal: None.



Played with the Albertson Fury from U-15 until she left for college … Played U-13 through U-15 with the RVC Tornadoes … Played U-10 though U-13 with the RVC Power where she won a state title.


Full name is Crystal Alyssia Dunn … Majoring in sociology … A member of her high school honor roll … Loves all sports … Likes to dance (and is one of the best dancers on the team), sing, go to movies and hang with friends … Likes to entertain people with her musical talents … Also likes to watch scary movies … Is one-quarter Native American … Brother Henry played in the minor leagues for the Cleveland Indians … Is a sneaker fanatic … Favorite athlete is LeBron James … Loves to eat Chinese food … Enjoys listening to Nicki Minaj and Beyoncé … Favorite movie is Love and Basketball.

As a junior, she had a memorable year, scoring five goals with five assists while playing all over the field while leading North Carolina to an improbable NCAA title and winning the MAC Hermann Trophy as college soccer’s best player … Dunn missed the non-conference portion of the Tar Heels' schedule while playing in the Women’s World Cup, but once she joined the lineup, her experience and versatility made an immediate impact … Dunn started at center back for the first 11 games back in the lineup before being moved to the center midfield for UNC's six-game NCAA Tournament run … She played a key role in helping Carolina capture their 22nd national championship in school history, assisting on goals in both Final Four games … The three-year starter earned NSCAA First Team All-America honors and was named the ACC Defensive Player of the Year … As a sophomore, she played in 19 of UNC’s 20 games while scoring three goals with six assists … Soccer America Freshman of the Year … A 2010 NSCAA First-Team All-America and was First-Team All-ACC … As a freshman, she was the All-ACC Defensive Player of the Year, the first ever freshman to win the honor … Part of the ACC All-Freshman Team … Started all 23 games she played in as a freshman -- totaling 1,929 minutes -- and was the third-leading scorer with 26 points on nine goals and eight assists … Scored six goals in the final five games of the campaign and played the entire match in 18 games …  Attended South Side High School where she scored 20 goals her senior year and was a four-year starter on the pitch at forward and midfield … A Parade All-American and New York Player of the Year … First-team All-State and All-Long Island in 2006, '07 and '09 … She was an All-New York First Team selection and All-Long Island as a freshman, sophomore and senior …  2009 NSCAA, ESPNRise and Parade high school All-America … Only played three games during her junior year due to National Team commitments … The New York Gatorade High School Player of the Year in 2009 … Team captain in 2008 & 2009  … Led team to New York state championships in 2006, 2007 and 2009 … She missed the 2008 campaign due to National Team commitments … The teams she played on in in '07 and '09 went undefeated and were ranked No. 1 in the nation by the NSCAA … Lost only two games in three seasons in high school … Score 46 goals and had 35 assists in three high school seasons… In the 2009 state championship game, she scored four goals and had a hat trick in the first 20 minutes of the match … As a senior, she was named Newsday Long Island Player of the Year, Nassau County Class A Player of the Year, New York Sportswriters Class A Player of the Year, BigAppleSoccer.com youth Player of the Year and the winner of the Mike Clark Award for the best all-around athlete in Nassau County.   



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