US SoccerUS Soccer

Carli Lloyd

Women's National Team
Stories
Photos
Personal
National Teams
Professional

Carli Lloyd's Story - One Nation. One Team. 23 Stories.

Carli Lloyd has used a tremendous work ethic, honed on the fields of New Jersey, often times by herself, to become one of the best and most clutch midfielders in the world. She cherishes the most important games and relishes the chance to put her training into action on the grandest of stages. Lloyd embraces the pressure of her own high expectations and looks forward to having her teammates count on her in the biggest of moments.

World Champions: USA Wins 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup

VANCOUVER, Canada (July 5, 2015) – The U.S. Women’s National Team defeated Japan 5-2 at BC Place on Sunday night to become the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Champion and the first three-time FIFA Women’s World Cup winner. 

In the first 16 minutes of play the USA took a 4-0 lead over Japan after Carli Lloyd netted the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history and Lauren Holiday added a goal to put the USA up by a wide margin. 

Japan ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak at 540 minutes by scoring in the 28th minute. The Asian nation built a bit of momentum early in the second half as Julie Johnston’s defensive clearance instead sent the ball into the USA’s net. However, Tobin Heath responded two minutes later to make it 5-2 and complete the highest scoring Final (seven goals) in FIFA Women’s World Cup history.

Loyd and goalkeeper Hope Solo were awarded the Golden Ball and Golden Glove, as the best player and the best goalkeeper at the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, respectively. It was the second straight Golden Glove award for Solo (she also won it in 2011) and the first for Lloyd. Lloyd became the second American to win the award, joining Carin Jennings, who won it in 1991. 

The USA is now the only country to win three Women’s World Cup and the country to score the most goals (five) in a WWC Final – no other team has scored more than two. 

The WNT will return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, respectively, before embarking on their nationwide celebration tour (details to be announced). 

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe), 3rd minute:
Playing a short corner kick on the ground, Megan Rapinoe sent a ball straight through several Japanese defenders to the middle of the six yard box. Carli Lloyd stormed from the back of the box to time her arrival with the ball perfectly and finished with a left-footed strike to score the fastest goal in FIFA Women’s World Cup Final history. USA 1, JPN 0 

USA – Carli Lloyd, 5th minute: Two minutes later, another set piece play led to a U.S. goal. Lauren Holiday stepped up to take the free kick from the right side of the box and sent a shot to the middle of the box that was flicked on by Julie Johnston through a forest of players before Carli Lloyd found it right in front of the net and tapped it in with the inside of her right foot for the second goal of the game and he fifth of the tournament. USA 2, JPN 0 

USA – Lauren Holiday, 14th minute: The sequence began with Tobin Heath, who sent a pass from the midfield intended for Alex Morgan but had the ball intercepted by Japanese defender Azusa Iwashimizu. Iwashimizu tried to head it out of danger but instead directed the ball up in the air. It came down right in front of Lauren Holiday, who volleyed it in stride with her right foot to net her first goal of the tournament. USA 3, JPN 0

USA – Carli Lloyd, 16th minute: Carli Lloyd intercepted the ball in midfield and touched it past a Japan player. Crossing the midfield line, she launched a shot that caught Japan goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori out of her net. While Kaihori got a hand to the ball, she could not keep it from bouncing off the post and into the back of the net, thus completing the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history. USA 4, JPN 0 

JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi), 28th minute: Nahomi Kawasumi played a great ball from the right channel, spotting teammate Yuki Ogimi inside the box. Ogimi evaded a challenge from Julie Johnston, swiveled around and sent a curling shot beyond the reach of Hope Solo for the Japan’s first goal of the match that ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak. USA 4, JPN 1

JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal), 52nd: Julie Johnston tried to clear a free kick attempt with a header that bounced across the face of goal and nestled inside the far post of Hope Solo’s net for Japan’s second score of the game. USA 4, JPN 2

USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian), 54th: Japan’s goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori  punched a Lauren Holiday corner kick clear to the right side. Kaihori’s punch wasn’t strong enough and the ball landed at Morgan Brian’s feet. Brian cut the ball back into the middle where Tobin Heath used the inside of her foot to one-time Brian’s perfect ball into the back of the net for the final score line. USA 5, JPN 2 (FINAL)

Next on the Schedule: The WNT return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Chattanooga, Tenn., respectively.
Broadcast information: FOX Sports 1 (Aug. 16), ESPN2 (Aug. 19)
Social: Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt@ussoccer_esp); FacebookInstagram

Milestone Watch:

  • The USA becomes the first country to win three FIFA Women’s World Cup titles.
  • Carli Lloyd is the first U.S. WNT player to score in four straight games in a World Cup. She netted a goal against China, Colombia and Germany and three against Japan.
  • Lloyd also became the first woman in a FIFA WWC to score a hat trick in a Final match and scored the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history.
  • Lloyd also became the third U.S. Woman to score a hat trick in WWC play: Carin Jennings Gabarra netted three goals against Germany in 1991 and Akers scored five against Chinese Taipei that same year.
  • Lloyd’s goal in the third minute was the fastest goal scored in a WWC Final game.
  • Lloyd scored both U.S. goals in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game (a 2-1 win over Japan), and the sole goal in the 2008 gold-medal game (1-0 over Brazil). With her three goals against Japan tonight, she became the first American to score in three major-tournament finals.
  • Midfielders Lauren Holiday and Tobin Heath each score their first goals of the tournament. It was Heath’s first goal in a Women’s World Cup.
  • The U.S. WNT finished this year’s tournament with a 34-4-5 all-time in Women’s World Cup play, outscoring its opponents 112-35 in 43 games. The 34 wins, 112 goals scored and the 43 games played are FIFA Women’s World Cup records.
  • With its five goals against Japan, the USA now holds the record for most goals scored in WWC play with 112 – the team scored 14 throughout the tournament. Germany scored 20 in Canada to finish in second with 111.
  • The USA’s five goals were the most any team has scored in a WWC Final. No other team has scored more than two.
  • The USA’s two goals in the first five minutes of the match against Japan was the first time any team scored twice in that span in a WWC game. 

Additional Notes:

  • The game was the third meeting between the USA and Japan in a major tournament Final. The USA now has a 2-0-1 record in those meetings: Wins in 2015 WWC and 2012 Olympics. Tie in 2011 WWC (1-3 PKs).
  • Lloyd leads the U.S. with eight goals in 2015.
  • While Wambach is the USA’s top scorer on the roster with 183 goals, Lloyd is next with 69 career international goals and Morgan has 52. Heather O’Reilly has scored 41.
  • Defender Becky Sauerbrunn is the only player on the roster to start and play every game for the USA in 2015. She has played the most minutes (1,509) of anyone on the team.
  • Five U.S. players played all 630 minutes of the tournament: defenders Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Sauerbrunn, midfielder Carli Lloyd, and goalkeeper Hope Solo.
  • In its last 17 games, the U.S. has surrendered just five goals and has scored 34.
  • Nineteen of the 20 field players on the World Cup roster saw action in the tournament.
  • Coming on as a sub in the second half, Wambach played in her 25th career WWC game, tied for second most all-time with Julie Foudy, Brigit Prinz and Formiga. Only Kristine Lilly has more (30).
  • Lloyd has sole possession of seventh place on the U.S. WNT’s all-time goal scoring list, passing Shannon MacMillan who scored 60 goals in her career. Lloyd, now with 69 goals, is the highest-scoring player in U.S. history who has played exclusively as a midfielder.
  • Hope Solo finished with 10 clean sheets in Women’s World Cup play, tying the record for most by a U.S. goalkeeper and most in World Cup play with Brianna Scurry.
  • Solo now has 136 goalkeeper wins and is the all-time leader in wins for a goalkeeper in U.S. history. Brian Scurry had 133 during her career (1994-2008).
  • Eleven players on the current USA roster have scored in a Women’s World Cup tournament: Tobin Heath, Wambach, Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday, Heather O’Reilly, Lori Chalupny, Shannon Boxx, Christen Press and Kelley O’Hara.
  • For the first time in FIFA WWC history, 24 nations participated at this year’s event, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams. 
  • Fourteen different players have scored for the USA in 2015: Tobin Heath, Lauren Holiday, Kelley O’Hara, Morgan, Wambach, Rodriguez, Press, Johnston, Klingenberg, Megan Rapinoe, Brian, Chalupny, Leroux and Lloyd. 

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
Date: July 5, 2015
Competition: 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Final
Venue: BC Place; Vancouver, Canada
Kickoff: 4 p.m. PT
Attendance: 53,341
Weather: Indoor Stadium

Scoring Summary:   1          2          F
USA                            4          1          5
JPN                             1          1          2

USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe)              3rd minute
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           5
USA – Lauren Holiday                                    14
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           16
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi)         27
JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal)                    52
USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian)               54

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (5-Kelley O’Hara, 61), 13-Alex Morgan (3-Christie Rampone, 86), 17-Tobin Heath (20-Abby Wambach, 79)
Subs Not Used: 2-Sydney Leroux, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny,18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press
Head coach: Jill Ellis
 

JPN: 18-Ayumi Kaihori; 3-Azusa Iwashimizu (10-Homare Sawa, 33), 4-Saki Kumagai, 5-Aya Sameshima, 6-Mizuho Sakaguchi, 8-aya Miyama (C), 9-Nahomi Kawasumi (15-Yuika Sugasawa, 39), 11-Shinobu Ohno (16-Mana Iwabuchi, 60), 13-Rumi Utsugi, 17-Yuki Ogimi, 19-Saori Ariyoshi
Subs Not Used: 1-Miho Fukumoto, 2-Yukari Kinga, 12-Megumi Kamionobe, 14-Asuna Tanaka, 20-Yuri Kawamura, 21-Erina Yamane, 22-Asano Nagasato, 23-Kana Kitahara, 7-Kozue Ando
Head Coach: Norio Sasaki

Stats Summary: USA / JPN
Shots: 15 / 12
Shots on Goal: 7 / 4
Saves: 3 / 2
Corner Kicks: 7 / 3
Fouls: 14 / 10
Offside: 1 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
JPN – Homare Sawa (caution)                      82nd minute
JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (caution)                     85

Officials:
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (UKR)
Assistant Referee 1: Natalia Rachynska (UKR)
Assistant Referee 2: Yolanda Parga (ESP)
Fourth Official: Claudia Umpierrez (URU)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Carli Lloyd

FIFA Announces Shortlists for FIFA Women’s World Cup 2015 Awards

The #USWNT will face Japan in the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final on Sunday. Prior to the match, FIFA announced the shortlists of tournament awards highlighted by four United States Women’s National Team players along with three players from the Japanese team they will meet in the final.

U.S. WNT candidates for the Golden Ball are defender Julie Johnston, midfielder Carli Lloyd and midfielder Megan Rapinoe. Johnston has played every minute as a member of the U.S. backline that is carrying a 513-minute shutout streak and has allowed just one goal through six games. Hope Solo is also among three candidates for the Golden Glove awarded to the top net-minder in the tournament, an honor she won at the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Julie Johnston

Japanese goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori was also nominated for the Golden Glove. Solo has allowed just one goal through six matches and has played an integral role in the U.S. shutout streak.  She’s been an immense presence on a well-organized backline and been a crucial part of the USA’s defensive resolve throughout the tournament. With another shutout, Solo would have 11 in Women’s World Cup play and set an all-time tournament record. Kaihori has allowed three goals in four appearances.

Lloyd has scored a goal in the last three knockout round matches for the U.S. including two game-winners. The veteran midfielder opened her scoring in the tournament against Colombia converting a penalty kick. The following match, Lloyd notched the game-winning header against China off a Johnston service. Most recently, Lloyd buried her second PK of the tournament in a 2-0 victory over Germany adding an assist on Kelley O’Hara’s first international goal.

Carli Lloyd

Rapinoe was the game changer for the United States in their opening match of the World Cup scoring two goals in America’s 3-1 victory over Australia. She’s notched an assist as well and despite being suspended for the quarterfinal due to yellow card accumulation, has been a consistently dynamic threat up and down the wing for the USA.

Megan Rapinoe

Saori Ariyoshi and Aya Miyama are the Japanese candidates for Golden Ball. Ariyoshi scored the first goal in Japan’s 2-1 victory over the Netherlands in the Round of 16. Miyama has played every minute for Japan scoring two goals and adding two assists including the game-winning assist to help her team advance to the quarterfinals. 

Sunday’s match features the two oldest teams in the history of the Women’s World Cup tournament with the U.S averaging 29-years-old and six months and Japan having the average age of 28-years-old and five months.

Neither team has any players eligible for the Young Player Award, however the youngest player on the roster for the U.S. WNT, Morgan Brian at age 22 has made a major impact in the tournament starting three matches for the U.S. and allowing Lloyd to take on a more attacking role through the knockout stages.

Japan’s youngest player, also 22, is Mana Iwabuchi, who has been a second half spark for the Japanese scoring the game-winning goal in Japan’s 1-0 victory over Australia in the quarterfinals.

The winners including the Golden, Silver and Bronze Boots for the tournament’s top scorers and the FIFA Fair Play Award will be announced after the FIFA Women’s World Cup Final on July 5. The match will kickoff at 4 p.m. PT and will be broadcasted on FOX and Telemundo.

U.S. WNT Speaks to Media About Final Showdown: Quote Sheet - July 3, 2015

U.S. Women’s National Team Head Coach JILL ELLIS

On the play of the backline:
“Our players have to be defenders first but I definitely want our outside backs to be able to get forward and want our centerbacks to be comfortable on the ball technically. A big part of it is mentality. You have to be a beast back there, sacrifice your body and do whatever it takes. And the relationship with our goalkeeper is critical.”

On Abby Wambach:
“Abby wants to win a World Cup and she’s committed to doing whatever it takes. She told me early on whatever role is needed she would deliver. She has amazing experience and ability in terms of being a prolific goalscorer. We’ve needed her on the field in big moments but also needed to allow other players the opportunity and time to continue to develop. Abby has been exemplary in terms of what she’s given this team and how she’s conducted herself. It’s still the same mindset for her: whatever we need, she’ll deliver.” 

On her coaching process during the tournament:
“As a coach you have to have resolve and you have to commit to what you believe in. This is a seven-game tournament and it was never going to be perfect. You just have to commit to what you believe in.” 

On defender Becky Sauerbrunn:
“Becky has stepped into a leadership role and she’s now our most veteran starter. Her mentoring of players has been fantastic. She has a great personality and keeps it upbeat and positive. In terms of performance, she’s been a major reason of why we’ve been so steady in the back and good at cutting things off and igniting our attack.” 

On young players:
“I said when I picked the roster that you need the balance of youth and energy with experience. [All the young players] have shown very clearly they belong. They’ve had big moments in big games and the future is very bright. There will be transition after this World Cup and moving forward younger players will start to break through even more.” 

U.S. Women’s National Team midfielder MEGAN RAPINOE

On the team growing throughout the tournament:
"In the first few games, everyone knew we weren't playing up to our potential. We were giving teams too much space and we were worrying too much about what we should be doing than acting instinctually. But, in the last three games and especially against Germany we've grown into ourselves in the tournament and have felt much more relaxed." 

On fan support:
"Even though we're in Canada, these matches have been feeling like we're at home. We have been selling out stadiums and they're packed with mostly U.S. Fans. I can't imagine it being too much different if we were actually in America. We're getting recognized all over Canada and I expect another great U.S. crowd on Sunday." 

On competition in the tournament:
"In the last four to five years, every major tournament has continued to get better on a competitive level. We saw it this year with teams like Colombia [beating France and making the second round] and England going to the semifinals. Five years ago I don't think you would have seen that. Teams are getting much better tactically and physically to be able to keep up with some of the teams that have been at the top." 

U.S. Women’s National Team defender/midfielder KELLEY O’HARA

On what has worked well for the backline so far this tournament:
“They have been able to build a relationship and that’s huge when you’re playing on the backline. It’s all about how you work with who is in front of you and who is next to you. This group works extremely well together. In general, when this team goes into big tournaments, the collective defending is always a big part of how we do. I think the team defending has been exceptional this World Cup and it starts from the forward line and works its way back. But as the backline they are the last line of defense. They’ve been great."

On her role for the U.S WNT over the last couple of years:
“I have learned many lessons through the past couple of years. My entire experience with the National Team has been about figuring out how to bring out that self-belief and keep the confidence. It’s really difficult to lose it because it’s such an intense environment. There is a lot of competition for starting spots and just minutes in general. I don’t think I used to be very good at it, the confidence, but the past two or three years I had to figure out a way to get through that and to keep the confidence up. I’m really thankful I’ve come to a place where I can do that because I think that it played a big part in this tournament for me personally.”

On the veterans potentially playing in their final World Cup:
“It could be the last World Cup for a couple players, but those are veteran players that have tremendous experience with this team. They know how to set good examples and they are incredible leaders. They steer the ship and keep us focused. Thinking about what it must be like for them realizing these may be their final games would just be really difficult. They’ve done an excellent job of keeping us focused at the task at hand and not just worrying about the other things that are going on.”

U.S. Women’s National Team forward ABBY WAMBACH

On the state of the team after beating Germany:
“I feel an air of confidence with this team right now. We don’t overlook Japan for one second because they are a very organized and good team. The best team will be left standing on Sunday night and of course we hope it’s us. We know it’s going to be a hard fought battle and we have to play well. We have to put together good combinations, good sequences to get goals. I am really proud of the way we have played and got better throughout this tournament. I think our last match against Germany was our best performance.”

On making the Women’s World Cup Final:
“I can’t be happier for this team to be in another final. It’s an achievement of itself but we still have to win. We haven’t won anything yet and we know what that feels like from four years ago. It’s not a good feeling.”

U.S. Women’s National Team midfielder CARLI LLOYD

On making the Women’s World Cup Final:
“I think we have really good momentum. I think we also have really good confidence within our group. But I also think we need to raise our game. This is a final. This is where you put everything on the line, there’s no holding back.”

U.S. Women’s National Team defender CHRISTIE RAMPONE

On facing Japan:
“We definitely have 2011 in the back of our minds. With that said, this is the third time we’ll meet Japan in a final, which is pretty amazing for both federations. They are very composed on the ball. They like to get into the offensive third and get into a good shape, knock the ball around and make the other team defend. They try to break the team down over a period of time. I don’t think they’re going to come out and pressure us like crazy and run around the field. I don’t think they’ll ever change their style. They play great soccer and you have to be patient when you play against them and take your opportunities when they come."

 

U.S. Women’s National Team defender ALI KRIEGER

On being coached:
"Just because I'm 30 years old and play on the National Team doesn't mean I don't need coaching. I think it's really great that she [Jill Ellis] steps up and says ‘look I expect this from you.’ I'm the type of player that you just have to tell me what you need and I'm going to apply it to the game." 

On playing different formations:
"Having a different formation helped us against Germany because of those wide spaces. I was able to get forward and into the attack a little bit more. My first focus was staying defensive because they were such a strong team but I think that it doesn't really matters what formation you play. It's just up to the personnel you have on the field to recognize the spaces they are going to give us. If Japan does clog the middle, then we need to go out wide, if they give us space in the middle then we have to take it. In the first few minutes we'll have to see what they give us. But the focus has to be on us and how we can break them down." 

On playing Japan:
"I think playing against one of the best teams in the world is fun. It's a challenge and it's why we're here. Four years ago we were in the final with them as well. It just goes to show you, we have two really strong programs. I'm just so confident in our team. It's just going to be so fun to battle against one of the best teams in the world. This is what it's all about. It just shows that both of our programs are really strong and really confident and that makes it more exciting. You train your entire life for this moment and it's finally here. Obviously, we've thought about these last four years, that last game. This is especially why it's exciting, to have an opportunity to be successful this time around."

U.S. Women’s National Team midfielder HEATHER O’REILLY

On everyone playing a role:
“Obviously this is a very deep team, a very talented team. The coaches did a good job at the beginning talking about how this is going to take 23 players and every one of us has the same goal. We all want to win this thing and everybody is doing everything that they can to make sure that the team does that. As a veteran player I try to give bits of advice to some of the younger players that maybe haven’t been here at this level. But mostly I just try to carry myself with a positive attitude for the team and I’m ready for any role.”

On the keys to facing Japan:
“I think bringing our best self. Playing our best soccer. This team is special. This team is very talented, aggressive, fantastic goal scorers. I think if we bring our best self, we’re going to have a lot of success.”

On comparing this team to past WWC teams she’s been on:
“I’ve been fortunate to have been part of some very talented teams in the past. It’s hard to compare. I will say I think this team is deeper than perhaps ever before. There is an incredible talent pool on this team and so many different skill sets and everybody is willing to do whatever role to help the team win.”

On the team's mindset heading into the Final:
“It’s important to stay present. We have a really important 48 hours ahead of us. We’ve all talked about staying present and not wasting any energy thinking about anything outside of this tournament. So all of my energy, all of my strength is going towards being the best for this game."

WNT Downs World No. 1 Germany 2-0 to Advance to 2015 World Cup Final

MONTREAL, Canada (June 30, 2015) – The U.S. Women’s National Team downed FIFA No.1-ranked Germany 2-0 at Olympic Stadium to advance to the Final of the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup. It will be the fourth World Cup final appearance for the USA.

The first half was a balanced affair with both teams pressing and having opportunities to get on the board yet neither was able to capitalize. In the second half, things got going when U.S. defender Julie Johnston was called for a foul inside the penalty box in the 59th minute for pulling down Alexandra Popp. Celia Sasic stepped up to take the penalty kick but missed wide left to keep the game scoreless.

Almost ten minutes later, Alex Morgan got fouled in the box and it was the USA’s turn to attempt a PK. Carli Lloyd confidently netted the shot to give the USA the lead before assisting on Kelley O’Hara’s 84th-minute strike – the first of her international career – to secure the U.S. win.  

Hope Solo and the USA back line continued to shut down opponents and has now kept a scoreless streak for 513 straight minutes (a span of more than five-and-a-half matches)  in this year’s World Cup, the longest clean sheet streak in U.S. World Cup history.

It was Solo’s 10th clean sheet in World Cup play, tying Brianna Scurry’s record for shutouts in World Cup competition. The 10 clean sheets in a World Cup are not only a U.S. record, but also a FIFA Women’s World Cup record.

The WNT will vie for its third Women’s World Cup title on Sunday, July 5 at 4 p.m. PT, when it takes on the winner of the other Semifinal between England and Japan, which will be determined tomorrow, at BC Place in Vancouver, Canada. The tournament Final will be broadcast live on FOX and Telemundo. Fans can also follow in-game updates on Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt and  @ussoccer_esp).

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Carli Lloyd (penalty kick), 69th minute:
Germany’s Annike Khran was called for a foul against Alex Morgan in the box, prompting the referee to point to the penalty circle. Carli Lloyd stepped forward and sent former FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year Nadine Angerer the wrong way as she blasted her shot into the left side of the goal. USA 1, GER 0

USA – Kelley O’Hara (Carli Lloyd), 84th minute: Meghan Klingenberg played a great ball from th outside of the area to Carli Lloyd inside the right side of the Germany box. Lloyd made a strong move to the endline and played the ball across the face of goal where Kelley O’Hara tapped it in with her right foot to finish the opportunity cap a sterling team move by the USA with her first career WNT goal. USA 2, GER 0 (FINAL)

Key Saves and Defensive Stops:
GER– Nadine Angerer, 7th minute: A corner kick from Megan Rapinoe went to the middle of the six-yard box by the near post where Julie Johnston was in great position to head it home. Germany’s goalkeeper Nadine Angerer was well placed to come up with a huge save and get the ball out of danger.

USA – Hope Solo, 8th minute: Alexandra Popp had a clear shot at goal from the left side of the USA box, sending a ball to the near post. However, Hope Solo was prepared and jumped high to deflect the ball over the crossbar for a Germany corner.

GER – Nadine Angerer, 15th minute: Alex Morgan split two defendersas she broke into the Germany box from midfield. Morgan sent a shot straight towards Angerer, who made a solid stop with her foot to deflect the shot away.

Next on the Schedule: The WNT will meet the winner of England/Japan on Sunday, July 5 at 4 p.m. PT at BC Place in Vancouver, Canada.
Broadcast information:  FOX; Telemundo 
Social:  Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt@ussoccer_esp);  FacebookInstagram

Milestone Watch:

  • Hope Solo recorded her 89th career shutout. It was the fifth straight World Cup clean sheet for the USA, and Solo’s 10th in World Cup play, tying Brian Scurry for the most by a U.S. goalkeeper.
  • Carli Lloyd is the third U.S. WNT player to score in three straight games in a World Cup, joining Michelle Akers (1991) and Abby Wambach (twice; in 2003 and 2011).
  • The U.S. now holds a 19-4-7 all-time record against Germany, outscoring the Germans 62-29. The USA hasn’t lost to Germany since 2003 and has gone 7-0-5 since then.
  • Kelley O’Hara made her third career World Cup appearance in the second half, and scored her first career international goal for the WNT.
  • The USA will be making its fourth appearance in a FIFA Women’s World Cup Final. Germany is the only other team to have reached the final that amount of times.

Additional Notes:

  • This was the fourth time the U.S. met Germany in Women’s World Cup play, the USA has a 3-1-0 advantage in these matches.
  • Carli Lloyd has scored in three straight games for the WNT. Her goal in the second half was her fourth career World Cup strike and her 66th overall.
  • Since allowing a goal against Australia in its opening match on June 8 in the 27th minute, the U.S. has shut out Sweden, Nigeria, Colombia, China and Germany – a stretch of 513 consecutive minutes.  
  • Defender Becky Sauerbrunn is the only player on the roster to start and play every game for the USA in 2015. She has played the most minutes (1,419) of anyone on the team.
  • Five U.S. players have played all 540 minutes of the tournament so far: defenders Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Sauerbrunn, midfielder Carli Lloyd, and goalkeeper Hope Solo.
  • In its last 16 games, the U.S. has surrendered just three goals and has scored 29.
  • So far, 19 of the 20 field players on the World Cup roster have seen action in the tournament.
  • Germany lost by two goals for the first time in 26 Women's World Cup games. The last time was in the 1995 final (2-0 to Norway).
  • The USA is the third country to reach consecutive Women's World Cup finals (Germany - 2003/07) (Norway - 1991/95).
  • Coming on as a sub in the second half, Wambach played in her 24th career WWC game, tied for second most all-time with Julie Foudy, Brigit Prinz and Formiga. Only Kristine Lilly has more (30).
  • Twelve different players have scored for the USA in 2015: Kelley O’Hara, Morgan, Wambach, Rodriguez, Press, Johnston, Klingenberg, Rapinoe, Brian, Chalupny, Leroux and Lloyd.
  • The game was the first time that Germany was shutout in this tournament and held to one shot on goal. Germany was averaging 12 shots on goal before tonight’s match and had outscored opponents 20-3.
  • The U.S. WNT is 33-4-5 all-time in the Women’s World Cup, outscoring its opponents 107-33 in 42 games. The 33 wins and 42 games played are FIFA Women’s World Cup records.

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report –

Match:  U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Germany
Date:  June 30, 2015
Competition:  2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Semifinal
Venue:  Olympic Stadium; Montreal, Canada
Kickoff:  7 p.m. ET
Attendance:  51,176
Weather:  Indoor Stadium

Scoring Summary:   1          2          F
USA                            0          2          2
GER                            0          0          0

USA – Carli Lloyd (penalty kick)                    69th minute
USA – Kelley O’Hara (Carli Lloyd)                 84

Lineups:
USA:  1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (20-Abby Wambach,80), 13-Alex Morgan (2-Sydney Leroux, 90+3), 17-Tobin Heath (5-Kelley O’Hara, 75)
Subs Not Used: 3-Christie Rampone, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny,18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press
Head coach: Jill Ellis
 

GER : 1-Nadine Angerer (capt.); 4-Leonie Maier, 5-Annike Krahn, 3-Saskia Bartusiak, 22-Tabea Kemme; 6-Simone Laudehr, 20-Lena Goessling, 11-Anja Mittag (10-Dzsenifer Marozsan, 78), 16-Melanie Leupolz, 18-Alexandra Popp; 13-Celia Sasic
Subs not used: 2-Bianca Schmidt, 7-Melanie Behringer, 8-Pauline Bremer, 9-Lena Lotzen, 12-Almuth Schult, 14-Babett Peter, 15-Jennifer Cramer, 17-Josephine Henning, 19-Lena Petermann, 21-Laura Benkarth, 23-Sara Daebritz
Head coach: Silvia Neid

Stats Summary: USA / GER
Shots: 12 / 15
Shots on Goal: 5 / 1
Saves: 1 / 3
Corner Kicks: 8 / 4
Fouls: 10 / 11
Offside: 1 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
GER – Leonie Maier (caution)                        34th minute
USA – Becky Sauerbrunn (caution)               38
USA – Julie Johnston (caution)                      59
GER - Annike Krahn (caution)                       69

Officials:
Referee: Teodora Albon (ROU)
Assistant Referee 1: Petruta Iugulescu (ROU)
Assistant Referee 2: Maria Sukenikova (SVK)
Fourth Official: Salome di Iorio (ARG)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Carli Lloyd

.

SOCCER TO THE BONE

In Delran, New Jersey, a small town with a blue collar work ethic, Carli Lloyd lived one block from the field. “I played a ton of pickup games – there were a lot of Turkish guys, all ages, and we’d just play for hours. You could play freely and try different things, not having a coach breathing down your neck. I loved it.” And when there wasn’t a game, she’d head out to the field alone, lugging a bag of collected balls. “I was kind of a ball scavenger. I’d go find them in the woods after weekend tournaments.” She’d shoot on goal, go fetch the balls, and start again.

Carli Lloyd

WORK ETHIC

While Lloyd was always a soccer junkie – the kid who always polished her cleats, the one at the field playing for hours, she says she still “had no idea what it took” to get to the next level. Post-college, Lloyd began developing the intense work ethic and commitment to fitness she’s now known for. She remembers the first time she was told to run for fifteen minutes, “I was like, uh? Fifteen minutes straight? I’m thinking, ‘Oh good lord.’ I’d get a side cramp, I’d be totally gassed. Now I go on 90 minute runs no problem. Before, I couldn’t do 15 minutes.”   

MENTALITY

Her coach would tell her stories of the greats – how Mohammad Ali would train on Christmas morning because he knew no one else was training on Christmas morning, how Bruce Lee would do 10,000 sits up a day. Lloyd took that to heart: “If it’s a holiday, if I am training on Christmas Day, most likely nobody else is – and that gives me the edge. If I’m supposed to run for 20 minutes and I get back and it’s only been 19:34, I’m going to jog in a circle for 26 more seconds. I’m never going to cut it short. I know what it takes now.”

Carli Lloyd

CHILDHOOD SWEETHEART

Carli Lloyd has known her fiancé Brian since she was a kid. “I lived on one side of the field, Carli lived on the other,” says Brian. “I’d always see her by herself kicking balls at the field.” While he is primarily a golfer, he played soccer in high school and continues to train with her to this day.

Carli Lloyd


U.S. National Team: The WNT’s all-time scoring leader (61 goals heading into 2015) for a player who has played exclusively as a midfielder, Lloyd has scored many crucial goals for the USA during her career, most recently during the 2012 London Olympics – when she scored twice in the 2-1 gold medal victory vs. Japan -- and 2014 Women’s World Cup Qualifying tournament.

2015: Named to the 2015 FIFA U.S. Women's World Cup roster, her third World Cup selection... Has appeared in all 16 games for the U.S. so far this year, starting 15, captaining eight and playing the second-most minutes on the team with 1382...Became the third WNT player to score in three straight games in a World Cup when she scored in semifinal match against Germany...  Earned her 200th cap against China in the quarterfinals on June 26, 2015, becoming the ninth player to do so and the fourth on the current roster... Scored on her 200th cap, becoming the third WNT player to do so.... Scored in World Cup Round of 16 game against Colombia on June 22, 2015... Has scored in every match the WNT has played against Colombia... Provided the assist on Abby Wambach's second goal in the USA's 3-0 win over the Republic of Ireland on May 10... Notched both goals in a 2-1 win against Norway at the Algarve Cup on March 4... Played in  all four games during the Algarve Cup, helping the WNT win its 10th title... 2014: Had arguably her most productive all-around year with the National Team, starting all 23 games in which she appeared, tying her career high with 15 goals scored while adding eight assists and led the team in both goals and assists … Tied for the team lead in games played and led the USA in starts … Led the USA in minutes played and the only player to play more than 2,000 minutes (2,043) …  Captained the team on two occasions against France (6/19) and Guatemala (10/17) … Became the ninth player in WNT history to hit the 50-goal milestone when she scored a brace against China PR (4/10) … The only player to play every minute of all five games at the 2014 CONCACAF Women’s Championship, she scored five goals with four assists to help the USA book its ticket to the 2015 Women’s World Cup and was named MVP of the tournament … Had three two-goal games, vs. Russia, China PR and Mexico … Scored a hat trick at the end of the year vs. Argentina at the International Tournament of Brasilia … In a span of seven consecutive games at the end of the year, she scored 10 goals while scoring at least one in each game … 2013: Played 768 minutes in 11 games while starting nine and scored three goals with one assist … Scored against the Korea Republic, Australia and New Zealand … With her 45th and 46th career goals, she tied and then passed Julie Foudy to become the top scorer in U.S. WNT history for a player that has played exclusively in the midfield … 2012: Played in all 32 matches for the USA, one of just three players to do so, while starting 27 … She was once again a hero in an Olympic gold medal game, scoring both goals in the USA’s 2-1 victory against Japan in front of more than 80,000 fans at Wembley Stadium … Became the only player – male or female – in the history of the Olympics to score game-winning goals in two consecutive Olympic gold medal games … Her 2,441 minutes played were the second-most in a year during her career … Her 15 goals were a career high for a calendar year and made her the third-leading scorer on the U.S. team … Did not start the first match of the Olympics against France, but came on early for an injured Shannon Boxx and scored the winning goal … She then started the remaining five games while scoring four total goals, good for second on the team in the Olympics behind Abby Wambach’s five goals … She never left the field again after coming into the France match in the 16th minute … Scored a slew of goals against top teams and registered her first career hat trick in a 3-0 victory against Mexico during Olympic qualifying to seal first place in the group for the USA … Started all five games of the Olympic Qualifying tournament in Vancouver, Canada, scoring six goals (tied for tops on the team) with one assist … Also scored in the 3-0 semifinal victory against Costa Rica that sent the USA to the Olympics … On the short list for the 2012 FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year and finished sixth in the voting … 2011: Tied for the team lead in games played with 19, starting them all, and led the USA in minutes played with 1,654 … Played all but 16 minutes of the Women’s World Cup in Germany, scoring one goal with one assist … The first World Cup goal of her career came against Colombia in group play on a shot from distance ... Tied for second on the team in scoring with six goals and three assists on the year … Scored three goals at the Algarve Cup, against Norway, Finland and then Iceland in the championship game … Also scored against Sweden and China at the Four Nations Tournament … Her six goals moved her into 15th place on the all-time U.S. scoring list with 28 goals … 2010: Suffered a broken ankle early in the WPS season but still played in 15 matches for the USA, starting 14 … She scored three goals with five assists and earned her 100th career cap in the final game of the year against Italy during the second leg of the FIFA Women’s World Cup playoff series … Scored against Germany in the Algarve Cup final … Started all five games at the CONCACAF Women’s World Cup Qualifying Tournament, scoring two goals with five assists … Played every minute of both legs of the playoff series against Italy … 2009: Played in six games for the USA, starting five … 2008: Named the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year … Was a fixture in the midfield for the USA, starting all 35 games in which she played, tying for the team lead in matches started during the year … Set a U.S. record for most starts in a year at 35 … Finished third on the team in minutes played with 2,781 … Had her best scoring year for the WNT, finding the net nine times with nine assists … Scored two huge goals during the 2008 Olympics, bagging the winner in the crucial 1-0 victory against Japan in group play and then scored one of the most important goals in U.S. history in the Olympic gold medal game as she netted the game-winner in the overtime victory against Brazil … Scored against Canada in the championship game of Olympic qualifying on a dramatic free kick in overtime … Scored the winning goal in a 3-2 stoppage time victory against Australia on April 27, in Cary, N.C. … Scored in both of the USA’s matches in Scandinavia, against Norway and Sweden … 2007: Established herself in a starting role in midfield … After scoring once in her first 24 matches, she scored four goals – one in each game – at the 2007 Algarve Cup, earning tournament top scorer and MVP honors … Scored her sixth career goal on a diving header in the USA’s 1-0 victory against Norway on July 14 and then registered her first two-goal game in a 6-1 win against New Zealand on Aug. 12, including one blast from 38 yards … Started 13 of the 23 matches she played … Played in her first Women’s World Cup tournament, starting three (all in the first round) of the five games she played … Had nine goals and three assists to finish third on the team in scoring … 2006: Earned her third career cap at the 2006 Four Nations Tournament … Earned the first two starts of her career at the 2006 Algarve Cup, gaining a place in the starting 11 against Denmark and in the championship game against Germany … Played in 19 games, starting 13, and scored one goal, that against Chinese Taipei … 2005: Earned her first two caps in 2005, playing against Ukraine and Mexico, a game in which she broke her wrist … 2004: Trained with the U.S. team during the 2004 Olympic Residency Training Camp … Youth National Teams: A member of four U-21 Nordic Cup championships teams, winning titles in 2002 in Finland, in Denmark in 2003, in Iceland in 2004 and in Sweden in 2005 … Scored three times in the 2005 Nordic Cup, including two against Denmark and one in the championship against Norway … Had two goals and an assist, starting every match, at the 2004 Nordic Cup ... Assisted on the lone goal in the USA’s 1-0 win against Denmark in the first round of the 2003 Nordic Cup ... First Appearance: July 10, 2005, vs. Ukraine ... First Goal: Oct. 1, 2006, vs. Chinese Taipei.

Professional / Club – 2014: Traded to the Houston Dash on Oct. 16 in exchange for midfielder Becky Edwards, defender Whitney Engen, and a third round pick in the 2016 NWSL College Draft … Started all 19 games in which she played for the WNY Flash during the 2014 season … Scored eight goals and had five assists … Named to the NWSL Best XI Second Team … Was third in the league in shots with 61 and sixth in shots on goal with 33 … Led the league in fouls committed with 51 … 2013: Allocated to the Western New York Flash for the 2013 NWSL season and played 1,296 minutes in 15 matches, starting 14 … Missed a few games at the start of the season due to injury, but returned to have an excellent year, scoring eight regular season goals, tied for third in the league with four other players … Scored both goals in the 2-0 playoff semifinal win against Sky Blue FC that sent Western NY to the first NWSL championship game … Finished fifth in the league in shots (53) … 2011: Signed with the Atlanta Beat for the 2011 WPS season, playing 800 minutes in 10 games while starting eight … Scored two goals for the Beat … 2010: Signed with her home state and WPS champion Sky Blue FC during the offseason … Played in just five games for Sky Blue in 2010 after suffering a broken ankle early in the season … Was out almost the entire season but returned to play the last two matches and logged just 200 minutes of action in the second season of WPS … 2009: Allocated to the Chicago Red Stars for the inaugural WPS season in 2009 … Played in 16 games for the Red Stars, starting 14, and scored two goals with one assist … Missed several games during the middle of the season after suffering a deep gash across her knee during national team training … Youth: Played for the Medford Strikers club team, winning the 1997 and 1998 State Cups ... Helped lead PDA Galaxy to the 2001 U-23 national title and earned MVP honors … Also trained with the WUSA’s Philadelphia Charge during the summer of 2003.


×