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Hope Solo's Story - One Nation. One Team. 23 Stories.

From an early age, Hope Solo wanted to be a professional soccer player. She just didn’t think it would be in goal. A highly-decorated scorer as a forward in high school in Richland, Wash., she didn’t come to terms with being a goalkeeper until her later years in college. With the support of her coaches at the University of Washington, she was told she could be the best in the world. They were right. Since then, she had been dedicated to her craft, and while she says that no one can perfect the art of goalkeeping, she loves that challenge it brings, and that’s what continues to motivate her.

Behind The Crest. Ep. 8 - #USWNT in Canada

The U.S. WNT wins the World Cup and celebrates with fans in this final episode of Behind the Crest from Canada. After a great win against Japan in Vancouver, the team goes on set at FOX, heads back to the USA to present the trophy to fans in Los Angeles and caps it off with a historic ticker tape parade in New York City.

WNT Celebrates World Cup Title in Los Angeles

The U.S. Women’s National Team celebrated its historic World Cup victory with 10,000 fans at LA LIVE in Los Angeles. Fresh from their 5-2 win against Japan on Sunday in Vancouver, the WNT landed in the USA and promptly shared the triumph with some of the #BestFansintheWorld. Now onto NYC for a ticker tape parade!

World Champions: USA Wins 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup

VANCOUVER, Canada (July 5, 2015) – The U.S. Women’s National Team defeated Japan 5-2 at BC Place on Sunday night to become the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Champion and the first three-time FIFA Women’s World Cup winner. 

In the first 16 minutes of play the USA took a 4-0 lead over Japan after Carli Lloyd netted the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history and Lauren Holiday added a goal to put the USA up by a wide margin. 

Japan ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak at 540 minutes by scoring in the 28th minute. The Asian nation built a bit of momentum early in the second half as Julie Johnston’s defensive clearance instead sent the ball into the USA’s net. However, Tobin Heath responded two minutes later to make it 5-2 and complete the highest scoring Final (seven goals) in FIFA Women’s World Cup history.

Loyd and goalkeeper Hope Solo were awarded the Golden Ball and Golden Glove, as the best player and the best goalkeeper at the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, respectively. It was the second straight Golden Glove award for Solo (she also won it in 2011) and the first for Lloyd. Lloyd became the second American to win the award, joining Carin Jennings, who won it in 1991. 

The USA is now the only country to win three Women’s World Cup and the country to score the most goals (five) in a WWC Final – no other team has scored more than two. 

The WNT will return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, respectively, before embarking on their nationwide celebration tour (details to be announced). 

Goal Scoring Rundown:
USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe), 3rd minute:
Playing a short corner kick on the ground, Megan Rapinoe sent a ball straight through several Japanese defenders to the middle of the six yard box. Carli Lloyd stormed from the back of the box to time her arrival with the ball perfectly and finished with a left-footed strike to score the fastest goal in FIFA Women’s World Cup Final history. USA 1, JPN 0 

USA – Carli Lloyd, 5th minute: Two minutes later, another set piece play led to a U.S. goal. Lauren Holiday stepped up to take the free kick from the right side of the box and sent a shot to the middle of the box that was flicked on by Julie Johnston through a forest of players before Carli Lloyd found it right in front of the net and tapped it in with the inside of her right foot for the second goal of the game and he fifth of the tournament. USA 2, JPN 0 

USA – Lauren Holiday, 14th minute: The sequence began with Tobin Heath, who sent a pass from the midfield intended for Alex Morgan but had the ball intercepted by Japanese defender Azusa Iwashimizu. Iwashimizu tried to head it out of danger but instead directed the ball up in the air. It came down right in front of Lauren Holiday, who volleyed it in stride with her right foot to net her first goal of the tournament. USA 3, JPN 0

USA – Carli Lloyd, 16th minute: Carli Lloyd intercepted the ball in midfield and touched it past a Japan player. Crossing the midfield line, she launched a shot that caught Japan goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori out of her net. While Kaihori got a hand to the ball, she could not keep it from bouncing off the post and into the back of the net, thus completing the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history. USA 4, JPN 0 

JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi), 28th minute: Nahomi Kawasumi played a great ball from the right channel, spotting teammate Yuki Ogimi inside the box. Ogimi evaded a challenge from Julie Johnston, swiveled around and sent a curling shot beyond the reach of Hope Solo for the Japan’s first goal of the match that ended the USA’s record-tying shutout streak. USA 4, JPN 1

JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal), 52nd: Julie Johnston tried to clear a free kick attempt with a header that bounced across the face of goal and nestled inside the far post of Hope Solo’s net for Japan’s second score of the game. USA 4, JPN 2

USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian), 54th: Japan’s goalkeeper Ayumi Kaihori  punched a Lauren Holiday corner kick clear to the right side. Kaihori’s punch wasn’t strong enough and the ball landed at Morgan Brian’s feet. Brian cut the ball back into the middle where Tobin Heath used the inside of her foot to one-time Brian’s perfect ball into the back of the net for the final score line. USA 5, JPN 2 (FINAL)

Next on the Schedule: The WNT return to the USA for a pair of friendly matches against Costa Rica on Aug. 16 and Aug. 19 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Chattanooga, Tenn., respectively.
Broadcast information: FOX Sports 1 (Aug. 16), ESPN2 (Aug. 19)
Social: Twitter (@ussoccer_wnt@ussoccer_esp); FacebookInstagram

Milestone Watch:

  • The USA becomes the first country to win three FIFA Women’s World Cup titles.
  • Carli Lloyd is the first U.S. WNT player to score in four straight games in a World Cup. She netted a goal against China, Colombia and Germany and three against Japan.
  • Lloyd also became the first woman in a FIFA WWC to score a hat trick in a Final match and scored the fastest hat trick in Women’s World Cup history.
  • Lloyd also became the third U.S. Woman to score a hat trick in WWC play: Carin Jennings Gabarra netted three goals against Germany in 1991 and Akers scored five against Chinese Taipei that same year.
  • Lloyd’s goal in the third minute was the fastest goal scored in a WWC Final game.
  • Lloyd scored both U.S. goals in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game (a 2-1 win over Japan), and the sole goal in the 2008 gold-medal game (1-0 over Brazil). With her three goals against Japan tonight, she became the first American to score in three major-tournament finals.
  • Midfielders Lauren Holiday and Tobin Heath each score their first goals of the tournament. It was Heath’s first goal in a Women’s World Cup.
  • The U.S. WNT finished this year’s tournament with a 34-4-5 all-time in Women’s World Cup play, outscoring its opponents 112-35 in 43 games. The 34 wins, 112 goals scored and the 43 games played are FIFA Women’s World Cup records.
  • With its five goals against Japan, the USA now holds the record for most goals scored in WWC play with 112 – the team scored 14 throughout the tournament. Germany scored 20 in Canada to finish in second with 111.
  • The USA’s five goals were the most any team has scored in a WWC Final. No other team has scored more than two.
  • The USA’s two goals in the first five minutes of the match against Japan was the first time any team scored twice in that span in a WWC game. 

Additional Notes:

  • The game was the third meeting between the USA and Japan in a major tournament Final. The USA now has a 2-0-1 record in those meetings: Wins in 2015 WWC and 2012 Olympics. Tie in 2011 WWC (1-3 PKs).
  • Lloyd leads the U.S. with eight goals in 2015.
  • While Wambach is the USA’s top scorer on the roster with 183 goals, Lloyd is next with 69 career international goals and Morgan has 52. Heather O’Reilly has scored 41.
  • Defender Becky Sauerbrunn is the only player on the roster to start and play every game for the USA in 2015. She has played the most minutes (1,509) of anyone on the team.
  • Five U.S. players played all 630 minutes of the tournament: defenders Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Sauerbrunn, midfielder Carli Lloyd, and goalkeeper Hope Solo.
  • In its last 17 games, the U.S. has surrendered just five goals and has scored 34.
  • Nineteen of the 20 field players on the World Cup roster saw action in the tournament.
  • Coming on as a sub in the second half, Wambach played in her 25th career WWC game, tied for second most all-time with Julie Foudy, Brigit Prinz and Formiga. Only Kristine Lilly has more (30).
  • Lloyd has sole possession of seventh place on the U.S. WNT’s all-time goal scoring list, passing Shannon MacMillan who scored 60 goals in her career. Lloyd, now with 69 goals, is the highest-scoring player in U.S. history who has played exclusively as a midfielder.
  • Hope Solo finished with 10 clean sheets in Women’s World Cup play, tying the record for most by a U.S. goalkeeper and most in World Cup play with Brianna Scurry.
  • Solo now has 136 goalkeeper wins and is the all-time leader in wins for a goalkeeper in U.S. history. Brian Scurry had 133 during her career (1994-2008).
  • Eleven players on the current USA roster have scored in a Women’s World Cup tournament: Tobin Heath, Wambach, Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday, Heather O’Reilly, Lori Chalupny, Shannon Boxx, Christen Press and Kelley O’Hara.
  • For the first time in FIFA WWC history, 24 nations participated at this year’s event, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams. 
  • Fourteen different players have scored for the USA in 2015: Tobin Heath, Lauren Holiday, Kelley O’Hara, Morgan, Wambach, Rodriguez, Press, Johnston, Klingenberg, Megan Rapinoe, Brian, Chalupny, Leroux and Lloyd. 

- U.S. Women’s National Team Match Report -

Match: U.S. Women’s National Team vs. Japan
Date: July 5, 2015
Competition: 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup – Final
Venue: BC Place; Vancouver, Canada
Kickoff: 4 p.m. PT
Attendance: 53,341
Weather: Indoor Stadium

Scoring Summary:   1          2          F
USA                            4          1          5
JPN                             1          1          2

USA – Carli Lloyd (Megan Rapinoe)              3rd minute
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           5
USA – Lauren Holiday                                    14
USA – Carli Lloyd                                           16
JPN – Yuki Ogimi (Nahomi Kawasumi)         27
JPN – Julie Johnston (own goal)                    52
USA – Tobin Heath (Morgan Brian)               54

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 11-Ali Krieger, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 19-Julie Johnston, 22-Meghan Klingenberg; 12-Lauren Holiday, 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.), 15-Megan Rapinoe (5-Kelley O’Hara, 61), 13-Alex Morgan (3-Christie Rampone, 86), 17-Tobin Heath (20-Abby Wambach, 79)
Subs Not Used: 2-Sydney Leroux, 6-Whitney Engen, 7-Shannon Boxx, 8-Amy Rodriguez, 9-Heather O’Reilly, 16-Lori Chalupny,18-Ashlyn Harris, 21-Alyssa Naeher, 23-Christen Press
Head coach: Jill Ellis
 

JPN: 18-Ayumi Kaihori; 3-Azusa Iwashimizu (10-Homare Sawa, 33), 4-Saki Kumagai, 5-Aya Sameshima, 6-Mizuho Sakaguchi, 8-aya Miyama (C), 9-Nahomi Kawasumi (15-Yuika Sugasawa, 39), 11-Shinobu Ohno (16-Mana Iwabuchi, 60), 13-Rumi Utsugi, 17-Yuki Ogimi, 19-Saori Ariyoshi
Subs Not Used: 1-Miho Fukumoto, 2-Yukari Kinga, 12-Megumi Kamionobe, 14-Asuna Tanaka, 20-Yuri Kawamura, 21-Erina Yamane, 22-Asano Nagasato, 23-Kana Kitahara, 7-Kozue Ando
Head Coach: Norio Sasaki

Stats Summary: USA / JPN
Shots: 15 / 12
Shots on Goal: 7 / 4
Saves: 3 / 2
Corner Kicks: 7 / 3
Fouls: 14 / 10
Offside: 1 / 1

Misconduct Summary:
JPN – Homare Sawa (caution)                      82nd minute
JPN – Mana Iwabuchi (caution)                     85

Officials:
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (UKR)
Assistant Referee 1: Natalia Rachynska (UKR)
Assistant Referee 2: Yolanda Parga (ESP)
Fourth Official: Claudia Umpierrez (URU)

Budweiser Woman of the Match: Carli Lloyd

Behind The Crest: Ep. 7 - #USWNT in Canada

The U.S. Women's National Team defeats Germany in the semifinal and flies west to Vancouver. As the team prepares for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final against Japan, Jill Ellis and Abby Wambach reflect on the progress to this point and look forward to the culmination of the journey.
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KEEPER BEGINNINGS

Hope Solo

Hope Solo was a forward who loved to score goals. But when she was fifteen, her team’s goalkeeper got hurt, and her coach, Carl Wheeler, stuck Solo in goal. She did well; so well that she was eventually asked to play ‘keeper for the state ODP team of the next age group above her. “I was this tiny, skinny beanpole, a dorky kid with braces back there in goal. But my team took me under its wing.” Solo continued to play ‘keeper for the ODP team but for every other team, she was still very much a forward.

Despite her talent between the posts, young Solo was not a fan of the ‘keeper position. “As a kid, I was just back there twiddling my thumbs,” says Solo. “I didn’t understand the intricacies of being a keeper, of organizing the defenses, none of that. And my grandparents were like, uh, why are you back there? You should still be up there scoring goals.” Solo agreed. She thought ‘keepers had a bad rap for being “the slow one, the unathletic one,” and when someone would ask, “Who’s the keeper on the team?” she still remembers hanging her head and not wanting to admit it. That would soon change.

Hope Solo

COLLEGE TURNING POINT

Hope Solo

By the end of high school, she was recruited by colleges all over the country – “Some times I didn’t know if they were recruiting me for forward or for ‘keeper.” But the University of Washington Huskies coaching staff, Lesle Gallimore and Amy Griffin, a former World Cup goalkeeper, told Hope, “I think you could be the best goalkeeper in the country.” They weren’t the first to have told her that, but they were the first to convince her. “After that, I put all my eggs in that basket. I believed it.”

MOTIVATION

“There’s so much talk about the lack of quality goalkeeping in the women’s game: that female goalkeepers aren’t good, that soft goals are let in,” says Solo. Solo’s mission is to make her mark on the position, to set a new standard. And as a two-time gold medal winner and the holder of the U.S. record for most career shutouts, she’s well on the way to redefining not only how goalkeepers play, but how they’re perceived.

Hope Solo


U.S. National Team: Regarded by many as the best goalkeeper in the world, Solo possess world class athleticism, instincts and a commanding presence as part of the foundation of the USA defense … She has started in goal at every age level of the U.S. National Team program.

2015: 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Champion... Named to the 2015 U.S. FIFA Women's World Cup roster, her third World Cup selection... Has played and started 15 matches for the USA this year for a 12-0-3 record, logging 1350 minutes... Won the Golden Glove award as the best goalkeeper in the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup... Recorded five straight World Cup clean sheets for the USA, and ten in World Cup play, tying Brianna Scurry for the most by a U.S. goalkeeper... Earned her 134th win with 1-0 shutout in the quarterfinals against China, moving her into first place on the WNT's all-time wins list... Earned her 174th cap in the Round of 16 game against Colombia, making her the WNT all-time leader in goalkeeper appearances... Has 170 starts and 89 shutouts in her career, both leading marks for WNT goalkeepers... Recorded three shutouts, including a 3-0 victory over Switzerland, a 0-0 draw with Iceland and a 2-0 victory over France in the championship match of the 2015 Algarve Cup to help the U.S. win its 10th tournament title...  2014: Appeared and started in 20 matches for the U.S. compiling a 13-3-4 record and playing 1710 minutes, third-most on the team … Started four of five games of the 2014 CONCACAF Women’s Championship and won the Golden Glove as tournament’s best goalkeeper in helping the USA book its ticket to the 2015 Women’s World Cup … Recorded 11 shutouts on the year, setting a new U.S. all-time record that sits at 78 heading into 2015 … 2013: Missed some time at the beginning of the year due to injury, but returned to play 540 minutes in eight matches, starting seven, and posted a 6-0-1 record … Heading into 2014 with 67 career shutouts, she was well within reach of the U.S. all-time record of 71 … 2012: Started 31 of the USA’s 32 matches and posted a record of 26-1-3 while helping the USA to the Olympic gold medal, her second … Led the USA in minutes played with 2,579 minutes in goal … Played every minute of the 2012 Olympics and put in an epic performance on the biggest of stages in the 2-1 gold medal game victory against Japan, making a handful of crucial and spectacular saves to preserve the victory … Had three shutouts in the Olympics … Played in more games and played more minutes than any other year during her career and her 11 shutouts were the second best yearly total of her career … Played every minute of all five games at the CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying tournament in Vancouver, Canada and did not allow a goal, which included a shutout of Canada in the championship game …2011: Solidified her standing as the world’s best female goalkeeper with a stellar performance during the Women’s World Cup in Germany … She was one of four U.S. players to play every minute and made key saves along with consistent overall play throughout the tournament, winning the Golden Glove as the top ‘keeper at the WWC … She also won the Bronze Ball as the third best player, the first time a goalkeeper has been voted one of the top three players in the tournament … Spent the first part of the year completing her recovery from major shoulder surgery the previous September, then made her return to the lineup on April 2, playing the second half against England … She then started the next 11 games and compiled a 6-1-3 record … Was on the short list of 10 finalists for the FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … 2010: Played in six games for the USA, winning them all, but had major shoulder surgery on Sept. 22 and spent the rest of the year rehabilitating … In the first match of the year, she became the first U.S. goalkeeper to save two penalty kicks during regulation time, twice stopping Iceland spot kicks in the opening game of the Algarve Cup … Made several excellent saves in the championship game of the Algarve Cup to help the USA to a 3-2 victory against Germany … Also played a world class match during a 4-0 victory against Germany in Cleveland, Ohio, in May … Finished seventh in the voting for FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … 2009: Named the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year … Started six matches for the USA, earning four shutouts and allowing just one goal, that coming in the Algarve Cup final … Named MVP of the Algarve Cup after a spectacular performance in the championship game where she made a bushel of world class saves in regulation and then saved a penalty kick in the shootout that would have won the game for Sweden … Had a fantastic match against Germany in Germany to earn the shutout in a 1-0 victory … 2008: Started 27 games and compiled a record of 23-1-0 while allowing just 0.46 goals per game … Earned 13 shutouts on the year … Had an excellent tournament at the 2008 Olympics, starting all six games and playing every minute while making numerous huge plays throughout the tournament to help the USA to the gold medal … Was in goal for the USA in the championship game of the Four Nations Tournament and the Algarve Cup, the crucial semifinal victory in Olympic Qualifying that sent the USA to China and the championship game of the Peace Queen Cup in South Korea … Was on the 10-player short list for FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … 2007: Started 15 games, earning nine shutouts and started the first four games of the 2007 FIFA Women’s World Cup in her first world championship … Was 13-0-2 on the year, allowing just eight goals and had three shutouts in the Women’s World Cup … 2006: Played in 18 matches, going undefeated at 14-0-4 … Goal given up against France in a 4-1 win at the Algarve Cup ended her streak of 1,054 minutes without allowing a goal from the run of play … 2005: Became the starting goalkeeper for the USA for the first time, starting seven of the team’s nine matches and earning seven shutouts … Started three of four games at the Algarve Cup, earning shutouts in each, including against Germany in the championship game … 2004:Trained with the USA in 2004 during Olympic Residency Camp and was named the alternate goalkeeper on the Olympic Team traveling to Greece ... 2002: Played 247 minutes with three starts in five matches and earning one shutout … 2001: Started four matches and played the full 90 minutes in all of them … 2000: Played three matches including her debut and first shutout against Iceland on April 5 … Participated in Residency Training Camp for the 2000 Olympics … Youth National Teams: Arrived late for the 2002 Nordic Cup after training with the full WNT, coming on at halftime against host Finland and then playing every minute of the remaining three-and-a-half games … Was the U-21 starter on the 2001 Nordic Cup championship team in Norway … Also played one match for the U-21s at the 2000 Nordic Cup in Germany ... Started for the U-16s and U-18s from 1996-1999 ... Did not surrender a goal in eight games for the U-18s in 1999, including three Pan-Am tournament starts in Winnipeg, Canada ... Shut out Mexico 1-0 in the 1999 Pan-Am final … First Appearance: April 5, 2000, vs. Iceland … First Shutout: April 5, 2000, vs. Iceland.

Professional / Club – 2014: Played every minute in 20 starts for the Reign to help Seattle to a 16-2-6 record, a regular season NWSL title and a berth in the championship game … Named to the NWSL Best XI Second Team … Led the league in wins and was third in shutouts with five … 2013: Missed the first eight matches of the season while recovering from injury, but ended up making a major impact while playing every minute of 14 starts … Was in goal for every win for the Reign during the season, and helped earn every point but one, compiling a 5-7-2 record … 2012: Allocated to her hometown Seattle Reign FC for the inaugural NWSL season … 2011: Signed with magicJack for the 2011 WPS season and played in four matches, compiling a record of 3-1-0 with two shutouts … Played in just four WPS matches as she took time off after the Women’s World Cup to heal her shoulder after accelerating her rehabilitation to make it back in time for the tournament … 2010: Played in six games for St. Louis Athletica before the team ceased operations, then signed with and played 16 games for the Atlanta Beat … Played the entire year with an injured shoulder and had major surgery soon after the end of the WPS season … Ended the season with a 6-8-8 record, six shutouts and a 1.64 GAA … Was third in the WPS in shutouts and goals against average and first in saves … Named as a starter in the WPS All-Star Game … 2009:Allocated to St. Louis Athletica for the inaugural WPS season in 2009 … Started 17 games for Athletica and was second in the league in saves and shutouts while allowing 14 goals and compiling a 0.82 GAA … Named the WPS Goalkeeper of the Year and a WPS All-Star … Played a key role in helping Athletica to a 10-6-4 record, good for second place during the regular season and a berth in the Super Semifinal … 2005: Stayed in Europe, this time to play in the French First Division with Lyon … 2004: Played in the Swedish First Division in 2004 with Göteborg … 2003: Taken in the first round of the 2003 WUSA Draft by the Philadelphia Charge … Played in eight games and had a 1.25 GAA.

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