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The WNT 23: Depth, Versatility and Balance

Through the first six FIFA Women’s World Cups, 61 American players saw action in the tournament while representing the USA on the grandest stage of the sport. The seventh Women’s World Cup roster in U.S. history has now been set, and we can add eight new names who are hoping to join that elite club.

The eight Women’s World Cup debutantes -- Ashlyn Harris, Alyssa Naeher, Whitney Engen, Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Morgan Brian, Sydney Leroux and Christen Press – represent the main strengths of this roster: depth, versatility and a blend of tremendous experience with some extremely gifted young talent.

These young guns not only give U.S. head coach Jill Ellis options in the starting lineup (they have been in the first XI for 26 games combined this year) but like many of their teammates, several can contribute at multiple positions. And of course, they provide some remarkably important ingredients to any successful team; young legs and an influx of youthful energy and wonder.

Depth

This Women’s World Cup roster may be the deepest ever assembled for a U.S. team, with almost every player having shown she can start and produce in an important match. It’s no secret that depth will be a key component for the teams that find success this summer, as the tournament now requires seven games to lift the trophy.

It will take seven of the most pressure-packed and competitive matches of a player’s career over a 30-day span to win the Women’s World Cup, and it’s a big ask for any player to play every minute. Ellis and her staff will be able to navigate those difficulties with 20 field players who are all confident and ready for the challenge.

“The past six months we’ve absorbed some injuries, but that’s helped improve our depth, and I feel confident that any one of our 23 players can start a game in the World Cup if needed,” said Ellis. “We’ve been able to play challenging teams and that has allowed us to vet our younger players and get them some great experience.”

Although Hope Solo will likely play every minute in goal for the second Women’s World Cup tournament in a row, Harris has done well in her starts this year and Ellis’ stated goal of having at least two starters at every position seems to have come to fruition.

At center back, the USA has four legitimate starters, including of course captain Christie Rampone, who has played the lion’s share of her 304 caps in the middle. Becky Sauerbrunn has become the USA’s most consistent presence in the middle of the defense, bolstered by Whitney Engen and Julie Johnston, the latter of whom has recently shown her international chops with a tremendous performance in three games at the Algarve Cup. She has already captained a U.S. team to a World Cup title, leading the U-20s in 2012 in Japan.

The USA also has four outside backs ready for selection, three of whom – Meghan Klingenberg, Kelley O’Hara and Lori Chalupny – can play on both flanks. Ali Krieger, who was one of the USA’s best players at the 2011 Women’s World Cup, is solidly entrenched on the right side, but has played in the middle extensively with her club.

The USA could play any of several combinations of central midfielders with veteran Carli Lloyd, Lauren Holiday and 22-year-old Morgan Brian likely to see the most minutes. Thirty-eight-year-old Shannon Boxx makes her fourth and final World Cup team and could provide valuable minutes to lock down a match.

On the flanks, the USA’s experience is vast, with Heather O’Reilly, Tobin Heath, Megan Rapinoe, and recently, Christen Press, adding many valuable dimensions from both sides of the field.

Of course, the USA’s five forwards bring an array of strengths, all of them sure to cause trouble for opponents. The lethal finishing abilities of Abby Wambach inside the penalty box, the breakaway speed of Alex Morgan and Amy Rodriguez, the scoring guile and final third explosiveness of Christen Press and the tenacity and bravery of Sydney Leroux are all difficult for opposing defenses to deal with.

Versatility

Having depth is one thing, but having depth AND versatility among those players is another thing entirely. The combination of the two gives the coaching staff the ability to line up in different starting formations and to change tactics during the course of the game, with substitutions, with the players already on the field, or both.

As mentioned above, the USA has outside backs who can play on both sides as well as several other players who can play flank midfield or push more forward, most notably Press, who has 20 goals in her first 41 games, and wingers Heath and O’Reilly. Lloyd, who has also played a few games in a wider role, Brian and Holiday are equally comfortable in defensive and attacking roles in the midfield while the offensive chops of Boxx, long more of a defensive-minded player, have never been questioned. She has 27 international goals and 24 assists in her long career.

Ellis has often spoken of the importance of relationships on the field, and who plays where and with whom will of course be a key to the USA’s success this summer.

“We’ve had several players over the past six months who have familiarized themselves with different roles within the team,” said Ellis. “The players have a really good understanding of their role, but if needed, can play another one as well.”

Balance

Any successful team has a blend of veteran leadership, young pros with plenty of experience and wide-eyed twenty-somethings who are itching to make an impact while pushing the veterans. This U.S. roster seems to have that mix.

History has shown that older teams tend to more often win world championships, but dependence on just experience is a gamble, as a team never wants to have too many players with too many miles on their odometers. Although the U.S. Women’s World Cup roster averages a remarkable 101 caps per player (with Rampone’s 304, Wambach’s 238 and O’Reilly’s 217 skewing that figure a bit), the average age is 28 years old, seemingly a perfect number. That’s how a team can combine talent with experience and fitness, as the majority of the roster is in their prime for international players.

“With only three subs in a match, having good cover in positions in all major lines and being able to have flexibility in the lineup allows you to adjust and adapt,” said Ellis. “Having players with that versatility allows us to do that within a match. With the potential of several games in heat and all of them on turf, having a good balance at goalkeeper, defense, midfield and at forward allows us to potentially rest players or have fresh legs when we need them.”

Any successful team has players who not only know their roles and embrace their roles but also execute their roles to the overall benefit of the team. With tremendous depth, versatility and balance to the 2015 U.S. Women’s World Cup Team, the squad seems poised for another deep run in this tournament.

2015 U.S. Women’s FIFA World Cup Team: By the Numbers

By the Numbers…

2          Number of players in U.S. history to be named to Women’s World Cup rosters for non-consecutive tournaments: Brandi Chastain (1991, 1999) and Lori Chalupny (2007, 2015)

4          Number of players to have previously played in five Women’s World Cups: Kristine Lilly of the USA (1991-2007), Formiga of Brazil (1995-2011), Birgit Prinz of Germany (1995-2011) and Homare Sawa of Japan (1995-2011). Christie Rampone could join that group in Canada. Formiga and Sawa have a chance to play in their sixth tournaments this summer. Bente Nordby of Norway (1991-2007) was on five Women’s World Cup rosters but played in four tournaments.

4          Number of players on the WWC roster from the Chicago Red Stars and FC Kansas City, most of any NWSL teams.

6          Players on the roster who hail from California. Four are from New Jersey, two are from Georgia and two are from St. Louis, Mo.

7          Number of games it will take to win the 2015 Women’s World Cup, up from six in the previous six editions of the tournament.

8          U.S. players making their first Women’s World Cup roster: Ashlyn Harris, Alyssa Naeher, Whitney Engen, Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Morgan Brian, Sydney Leroux and Christen Press.

8          Number of players on the U.S. roster who have scored in a WWC tournament.

9          Former FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup champions on the 2015 WWC roster: Harris (2002), Naeher (2008), Lori Chalupny (2002), Johnston (2012), Klingenberg (2008), Brian (2012), Heather O’Reilly (2002), Leroux (2008), Alex Morgan (2008)

9          Caps for Johnston, the least of any of the field players to make the WWC team.

11        Number of players, out of 13, who played in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game who made this WWC roster.

13        Goals by Abby Wambach in Women’s World Cup play, a U.S. record.

15        Players on the roster have played for the USA in a FIFA Women’s World Cup at the         youth level.

18        Women’s World Cup matches played by Wambach, the most on the 2015 WWC roster. Rampone has played in 17 Women’s World Cup games while Boxx has 15. Other players in double figures in Women’s World Cup matches are Carli Lloyd (11), O’Reilly (11) and Hope Solo (10).

22        Age of Brian, the youngest player on the WWC roster. Johnston is 23.

23        Number of players on Women’s World Cup rosters, up from 21 for the 2011 tournament.

24        Number of nations that will participate, for the first time, in the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams.

27        Total Women’s World Cup goals scored by the USA’s WWC roster.

28        Average age of the USA’s WWC roster.

32        Goals allowed by the U.S. Women in WWC play.

36        Number of matches played by the USA in the WWC (27-4-5), most by any team.

39        Age of Rampone, the oldest player on the WWC roster. Boxx is 38.

98        Goals scored by the U.S. Women in WWC play.

101      Average caps per player on the WWC roster.

122      Number of Women’s World Cup matches combined played by the WWC roster.

304      Caps for Rampone, most of the Women’s World Cup roster, most of any active player in the world, and second most in soccer history.

Ellis Names U.S. Roster for 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup Team

CHICAGO (April 14, 2015) – With 55 days until the USA’s opening match of the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, U.S. Women’s National Team head coach Jill Ellis has named the 23 players who will represent the United States on women’s soccer’s grandest stage. The roster will not become official until it is submitted to FIFA on May 25, which is the deadline for all teams to submit their final squads.

U.S. captain Christie Rampone has been named to her fifth Women’s World Cup roster, tying Kristine Lilly for most World Cups for an American player, man or woman. Midfielder Shannon Boxx and forward Abby Wambach will be playing in their fourth World Cups while Carli Lloyd, Hope Solo and Heather O’Reilly make their third Women’s World Cup roster. Ellis named eight players who will be participating for the first time and nine who will be participating for the second time.

The roster, which features three goalkeepers, eight defenders, seven midfielders and five forwards, is the product of nearly 11 months of player evaluation since Ellis was named head coach in May of 2014. During that time, she has been on the bench for 23 international matches (including two as interim coach before being officially named head coach) and has seen 34 players in training camps, 29 in international matches and many more in NWSL matches. Ellis selected 14 players who were part of the 2012 Olympic gold medal-winning team in London.

“The players selected have the confidence, experience and desire to help us win a world championship,” said Ellis. “We had an excellent group to pick from and at the end of the last camp, I complemented all the players on how much they pushed each other and competed to make this selection challenging."

The Women’s World Cup roster will make up the squad for the USA’s final three matches before departing for Canada. The three-match Send-Off Series takes place in May and will start when USA faces the Republic of Ireland on Sunday, May 10, at 11:30 a.m. PT at Avaya Stadium in San Jose, California, the new home of Major League Soccer's San Jose Earthquakes. From there, the USA will travel down the coast for its second Send-Off Series match, facing Mexico on Sunday, May 17, at 6 p.m. PT at StubHub Center in Carson, California. Both California matches will be broadcast on FOX Sports 1.

The U.S. heads to the East Coast to conclude the Send-Off Series against Korea Republic on Saturday, May 30, at Red Bull Arena in Harrison, New Jersey. The match will kick off at 4:30 p.m. ET and will be broadcast on ESPN and WatchESPN. Fans can follow all the upcoming WNT matches on Twitter @ussoccer_wnt and @ussoccer_esp

This summer, the USA will face Australia, Sweden and Nigeria in Group D at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. The USA opens against Australia on June 8 at Winnipeg Stadium, followed by Sweden on June 12 in Winnipeg and Nigeria on June 16 at BC Place in Vancouver.

“It’s been a thorough process of evaluation, and we had a lot of good opportunities to see the players in highly competitive situations. I feel that this group of players can accomplish our goals,” said Ellis. “We have positional depth, versatility, and players that will give us balance on every line.”

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup runs from June 6-July 5 and all 52 games will be shown live on FOX, FOX Sports 1, FOX Sports 2 and on tablets and mobile devices through the FOX Sports GO app and FOXSportsGO.com.

2015 United States FIFA Women’s World Cup Roster By Position: (Detailed Roster)
GOALKEEPERS (3): Ashlyn Harris* (Washington Spirit), Alyssa Naeher* (Boston Breakers), Hope Solo*** (Seattle Reign FC)
DEFENDERS (8): Lori Chalupny** (Chicago Red Stars), Whitney Engen* (Western NY Flash), Julie Johnston* (Chicago Red Stars), Meghan Klingenberg* (Houston Dash), Ali Krieger** (Washington Spirit), Kelley O’Hara** (Sky Blue FC), Christie Rampone***** (Sky Blue FC), Becky Sauerbrunn** (FC Kansas City)
MIDFIELDERS (7): Shannon Boxx**** (Chicago Red Stars), Morgan Brian* (Houston Dash), Tobin Heath** (Portland Thorns FC), Lauren Holiday** (FC Kansas City), Carli Lloyd*** (Houston Dash), Heather O’Reilly*** (FC Kansas City), Megan Rapinoe** (Seattle Reign FC)
FORWARDS (5): Sydney Leroux* (Western NY Flash), Alex Morgan** (Portland Thorns FC), Christen Press* (Chicago Red Stars), Amy Rodriguez** (FC Kansas City), Abby Wambach**** (unattached)

*        First Women’s World Cup
**       Second Women’s World Cup
***     Third Women’s World Cup
****   Fourth Women’s World Cup
*****  Fifth Women’s World Cup

Additional Notes:

  • The 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup will be the seventh time FIFA stages the event and the first to include 24 nations, up from 16 that participated in the previous four editions. The 1991 and 1995 Women’s World Cups featured 12 teams.
  • With the addition of eight teams, the format now includes an additional knockout round game (Round of 16) and it will now require seven matches to win the tournament, up from six in the previous tournaments. In part due to the additional match, Women’s World Cup rosters now have 23 players (up from 21 in 2011).
  • Christie Rampone is poised to play in her fifth Women’s World Cup tournament. Four female players have previously played in five Women’s World Cups: Kristine Lilly of the USA (1991-2007), Formiga of Brazil (1995-2011), Birgit Prinz of Germany (1995-2011) and Homare Sawa of Japan (1995-2011). Formiga and Sawa have a chance to play in their sixth tournaments this summer. Bente Nordby of Norway (1991-2007) was on five Women’s World Cup rosters but played in four tournaments.
  • Rampone is the last remaining active player from the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup championship team.
  • Only two men have appeared in five World Cups: Goalkeeper Antonio Carbajal of Mexico (1950-1966) and midfielder Lothar Matthäus of Germany (1982-1998). Italian goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon was named to five teams but played in four tournaments.
  • Lori Chalupny becomes the second player in U.S. history to be named to non-consecutive Women’s World Cup rosters, following Brandi Chastain (1991, 1999). Chalupny was a member of the 2007 Women’s World Cup team.
  • Of the players named to the roster, Wambach has the most experience in the Women’s World Cup, having played 18 matches while scoring 13 goals, an all-time U.S. Soccer record. Rampone has played in 17 Women’s World Cup games while Shannon Boxx has 15. Other players in double figures in Women’s World Cup matches are Carli Lloyd (11), Heather O’Reilly (11) and Hope Solo (10).
  • The players making their first Women’s World Cup roster are: Ashlyn Harris, Alyssa Naeher, Whitney Engen, Julie Johnston, Meghan Klingenberg, Morgan Brian, Sydney Leroux and Christen Press.
  • Johnston and Brian were a part of the U.S. team that won the 2012 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Japan.
  • Naeher, Leroux, Klingenberg, and Morgan were a part of the U.S. team that won the 2008 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Chile.
  • O’Reilly, Harris and Chalupny were a part of the U.S. team that won the 2002 FIFA U-19 Women’s World Cup in Canada.
  • Fifteen players on the roster have played for the USA in a FIFA Women’s World Cup at the youth level.
  • Brian is the youngest player on the team at 22. Johnston is 23. Rampone is the oldest player at 39 and will turn 40 during the tournament on June 24. Boxx is 38.
  • All nine NWSL clubs are represented on the roster with the Chicago Red Stars and FC Kansas City having four players each.
  • Rampone is the most capped player on the roster with 304 games played. Johnston is the least capped field player, making the World Cup team after having only played in nine games so far, starting four.  She has scored twice already, once each in the last two matches.
  • Back-up goalkeepers Harris (6 caps) and Naeher (1) are the least-capped players on the roster.
  • The roster averages 101 caps per player and has a combined total of 122 Women’s World Cup matches.
  • The average age of the U.S. roster is 28 years old.
  • Eight players have previously scored in a Women’s World Cup tournament, totaling 27 goals.
  • Of the 13 players who played in the 2012 Olympic gold medal game, 11 were named to this Women’s World Cup roster.
  • Six players on the roster are from California, while four are from New Jersey, two from Georgia, and two are from St. Louis, Mo.

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WNT Beats New Zealand in front of Huge Crowd at Busch Stadium

The U.S. Women's National Team tuned up for the 2015 Send-Off Series with a 4-0 win in front of more than 35,000 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

U.S. National Team: Since debuting for the USA in 2001, she has become one of the most dangerous goal scorers in the world and now holds the all-time international scoring record … In addition to breaking Mia Hamm’s world scoring record during her four-goal performance against the Korea Republic on June 20, 2013, it also made her the USA’s all-time leader in multiple-goal games with 43 … Heading into 2015, she has 35 two-goal games, five hat tricks, two four-goal game and one five-goal game … Has the best goals-per-game ratio in U.S. history, having scored 177 goals in 232 games so far… Of her 177 goals through the end of 2014, 75 were scored with her head (42 percent) … Through the end of 2014, the USA is 112-2-8 all-time in games in which she scored.

2015:
 Has played in all seven matches for the U.S. Women so far this year, captaining two and starting three... Scored her first goal of the year and 178 of her career on March 6 during a 3-0 victory over Switzerland at the Algarve Cup, leading the USA to its 10th tournament title... With the goal against Switzerland, she jumped 20 goals ahead of former record holder Mia Hamm (158 goals from 1987-2004)... 2014: Appeared in 20 games for the U.S. and scored 14 goals, including seven during the 2014 CONCACAF Women’s Championship where she was awarded the Golden Boot as the tournament’s top scorer as she helped the USA qualify for the 2015 Women’s World Cup … Scored four times in the CONCACAF championship game victory vs. Costa Rica on Oct. 26, three coming with her head … Hit double-figures in goals for a calendar year for the eighth time in her career … Named a finalist for the U.S. Soccer Female Player of the Year Award… Named the CONCACAF Female Player of the Year… Named a finalist for the FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year for the fourth consecutive year … 2013: Once again led the U.S. team in scoring, finding the net 11 times while starting 12 of the 14 games she played … Played 989 minutes and also tied for the team-lead in assists with six … Won the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year award for the record sixth time, and third time in the past four years, passing Mia Hamm who was honored for five consecutive years from 1994-1998 … Wambach has now won the award in 2003, 2004, 2007, 2010, 2011 and 2013 … It was the seventh year of her career in which she reached double-figures in goals, second only to Hamm (nine years) … Tied then broke Hamm’s all-time international scoring record on June 20 during a 5-0 victory vs. the Korea Republic when she scored four goals, all in the first half … In that match she tied Hamm’s record at 158 with her second goal of the game, and then broke it with her third, heading in a corner kick from Megan Rapinoe in the 29th minute … She scored her first three goals of that game in a 20-minute span … Also scored against Scotland, Iceland, Germany, Mexico and Brazil during the year … Was one of three finalists for the 2013 FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year, and finished second in the voting … Scored the second most goals for club and country (22) of any American player during the year … 2012: Had one of the best years of her brilliant career, culminating in winning the FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year, which was presented the Gala Awards in Zurich, Switzerland … She was just the second American to win the honor and first since Mia Hamm won it the first two years it was awarded in 2001 and 2002 … Had the second best scoring year of her career, pounding in 27 goals (just one behind Alex Morgan) with eight assists … Set a U.S. and Olympic record by scoring in the first five matches of the 2012 Olympics … Her header goal against France off a corner kick with the USA down 2-0 sparked a comeback to the 4-2 victory and ignited the USA’s gold medal run … Her clutch penalty kick with 10 minutes left in regulation tied the semifinal against Canada 3-3, sending the game to overtime where the USA dramatically won 4-3 on Alex Morgan’s goal in the last minute of stoppage time at the end of the second OT period … Started all six games at the Olympics and played all but 13 minutes of the tournament while winning her second gold medal … Had seven multiple goal games and scored in 20 of the USA’s 32 matches … The only player to start all 32 matches, she played 2,454 minutes – the most of any year in her career – and the most of any field player … Delighted her hometown crowd in the first game of the 10-game Fan Tribute Tour following the Olympics by scoring twice against Costa Rica in Rochester, N.Y. … Scored in both friendly matches against Germany in October … Started all six games at the CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying tournament in Vancouver, Canada, playing just 285 minutes and still scored six goals to lead the U.S. team in the competition while dishing five assists … Scored two goals in each of the final two matches of the year against China to up her career total to 152, just seven short of breaking Mia Hamm’s all-time scoring record for international soccer … 2011: Earned U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year honors for the second consecutive year and the fifth time overall … Scored eight goals with four assists in 2011, including goals in the final four matches of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup, all with her head … The only U.S. player to ever score in the final four – or even three – games of the Women’s World Cup … Won the Silver Ball as the second best player at the Women’s World Cup and the Bronze Boot as the third leading scorer in the tournament … Struggled with an injury leading into the Women’s World Cup, and had scored just one goal heading to Germany, but then scored in the USA’s last group game, in the quarterfinal against Brazil, in the semifinal against France and in the championship against Japan … She made both of her attempts in the two penalty kick shootouts at the World Cup, the only U.S. player to do so … At the time, her goal against Brazil in the dying seconds of overtime time was the latest goal ever scored in a FIFA competition (122nd minute) … Her four goals in the tournament gave her 13 World Cup goals for her career, moving her past the great Michelle Akers into first on the all-time list of U.S. goal scorers for a World Cup … She scored in both post-World Cup matches against Canada, including two goals in a 3-0 win in front of a sold-out crowd in Portland on Sept. 22, giving her goals in six consecutive games and tying her personal best streak … Finished third in the voting for the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … Named the Women’s Sports Foundation Sportswoman of the Year and the prestigious Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year, the first soccer player – man or woman – ever to receive the award … Played 1,330 minutes in 17 games, starting 13 … 2010: Had a sensational year for the USA, starting all 18 games she played while scoring 16 goals with four assists to lead the team in scoring … Had six multiple goal games, scoring twice against Norway, Sweden, Germany and Costa Rica and a hat trick against Guatemala, the seventh hat trick of her career … Scored in the 3-2 victory against Germany in the Algarve Cup championship game … Scored the game-winner against Mexico in the 1-0 victory played in ankle- deep snow in Salt Lake City and then made snow angels to celebrate … Scored twice in the must-win third- place game against Costa Rica at the CONCACAF Women’s World Cup Qualifying tournament as the USA won 3-0 to earn a spot in the playoff series against Italy …Started all five games at the Women’s World Cup Qualifying tournament, leading the team in scoring with eight goals … Played all 180 minutes of both legs against Italy and assisted on Alex Morgan’s game-winning goal in stoppage time during the first leg in Padova … Finished fifth in the voting for FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … 2009: Played every minute of all four matches she played for the USA, making her return to the WNT from a broken leg on May 25 against Canada in Toronto … In her next match, she scored her 100th career goal in dramatic fashion during a 1-0 victory against Canada in her hometown of Rochester, N.Y., on July 19 … She became the fifth player in U.S. history and ninth player in world history to score 100 career international goals … Scored her 101st career goal in a 1-0 victory against Germany in front of a sold-out crowd in Augsburg, Germany … 2008: Was having another brilliant year when it was cut short by a broken leg on July 16 against Brazil in San Diego in the last match before the Olympics … Before she broke both her tibia and fibula, causing her to be replaced on the Olympic roster, she had played in 22 games, starting 21, and was the USA’s leading scorer with 13 goals and 10 assists … Her 10 assists were the second most in a calendar year for the WNT … Scored several key goals for the USA, including the game-winner against Mexico in Olympic Qualifying … Scored the game-winner against Australia and both goals against Italy at the Peace Queen Cup … 2007: Named U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year for the third time … Led the USA in scoring with 20 goals, just the sixth time a player has scored 20 or more goals in a calendar year … Became the first player to score 20 or more goals in a year twice in her career … With her first goal against New Zealand on Aug. 12, she moved into sole possession of fifth place on the all-time U.S. goal scoring list … Became the 20th U.S. player to hit 100 caps, earning her century against England in the Women’s World Cup quarterfinal win … Scored six goals in the Women’s World Cup to lead the USA and won the Silver Shoe as the second-leading scorer in the tournament … Had seven two-goal games … Scored her 20 goals in 21 total games … Also had five assists … Scored in eight of the USA’s 11 domestic games … 2006: Led the USA in scoring with 17 goals and eight assists … Started all three games at the Four Nations, scoring against Norway in the first match for her 50th career goal … Scored 50 career goals in 64 games, the second-quickest to 50 goals in U.S. history behind Michelle Akers … Started all four games at the Algarve Cup, getting one goal against Denmark … Recorded her fourth career hat trick in a 3-1 victory against Japan on May 7 in Kumamoto … Came up huge for the USA at 2006 CONCACAF Qualifying while playing on a bad ankle, scoring both goals in the 2-0 win against Mexico that sent the USA to the Women’s World Cup … Finished fourth in the voting for FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … 2005: Started all eight games in which she played, scoring four goals with five assists … Scored twice in her four starts at the 2005 Algarve Cup … Entering 2005, she had scored 45 goals in her 55 career cap; while after 55 career games, Mia Hamm had scored 16 career goals … 2004: Named the 2004 U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year, her second in a row … Finished fourth in voting for the 2004 FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year … Started all five matches she played at the 2004 Olympics (she was suspended for the final group game vs. Australia) and scored four goals with one assist … She became the first U.S. player to score four goals in an Olympic tournament, helping the USA to the gold medal with goals against Greece and Brazil in the first round, Japan in the quarterfinals and the dramatic overtime game-winner in the Olympic Final against Brazil … Enjoyed one of the greatest years in U.S. Women’s National Team history, scoring 31 goals in the final 30 matches of 2004 … The 31-goal performance marks the second highest total in a calendar year by a U.S. player, and she became one of only five players to score 20 or more goals in a year, joining Mia Hamm, Michelle Akers, Kristine Lilly and Tiffeny Milbrett … Her 31 goals and 13 assists mark just the seventh time a U.S. players has recorded double figures in goals and assists in a calendar year, but four of those years came from Hamm … The 75 points mark the third-highest point total in U.S. history, surpassed only by Michelle Akers in 1991 (39 goals, 7 assists, 85 points) and Alex Morgan in 2012 (28 goals, 21 assists, 77 points) … The Denmark match on Nov. 6 was the first game the USA had lost in which Wambach had scored and following the 2005 Algarve Cup, the USA was 32-1-1 in games she has tallied … Averaged a goal every 74 minutes she was on the field in 2004 … Tied a U.S. record for goals in a game on Oct. 23, scoring all five goals in the second half in the USA’s 5-0 win against Ireland in Houston … In May, she played at forward, in the midfield, and for most of the second half, at left back, for the FIFA Women’s World Stars in Paris during a 3-2 win against Germany as part of FIFA’s Centennial celebrations at Stade de France … 2003: Played in just six matches, starting three, before the Women’s World Cup, but turned out to be one of the stars of the tournament … Ended the year having played 14 matches, starting nine, including five Women’s World Cup matches … Led the USA in scoring at the WWC with three goals, tallying one of the most important goals in U.S. history in the 1-0 win against Norway in the quarterfinal … Also scored against Nigeria and North Korea … She scored all nine of her goals in the last 12 matches of the year … 2002: Earned seven of her eight career caps to date, starting four matches, while scoring five goals … Had a hat trick against Scotland on Sept. 8 … Was a member of the CONCACAF Women’s Gold Cup Team that qualified the USA for the 2003 Women’s World Cup, scoring against Panama in her only appearance of the tournament … Youth National Teams: A member of the 2001 U.S. Under-21 Nordic Cup championship team, she scored three goals across the first three matches, but was suspended from the final due to yellow card accumulation … Also played for the U.S. Under-16 National Team in 1996 … First Appearance: Sept. 9, 2001, vs. Germany ... First Goal: April 27, 2002, vs. Finland.

Professional / Club2014: In her seventh pro club season, she missed numerous game due to injuries, but still started and played in 10, racking up 835 minutes and scoring six goals with four assists …  2013: Allocated to her hometown Western New York Flash for the inaugural NWSL season and helped lead her club to a first-place regular season finish and into the NWSL title game, which it hosted … Played 1,693 minutes in 19 games, all starts, while scoring 11 goals with eight assists … Finished third in the league in shots (64), and finished second in shots on goal (40) … She was tied for second in NWSL goal scoring and second in assists while being named to the NWSL Best XI … 2011: Scored nine goals for magicJack despite playing in just 11 games due to National Team commitments in helping her club to a playoff berth … Also had two assists … Was named to the WPS Best XI … Took over as head coach of magicJack on July 21 following the Women’s World Cup and guided the team at the end of the season and in its two playoff matches … 2010: Started all 22 games she played for the Freedom, logging 1,979 minutes … Scored 13 goals (second in WPS) with eight assists (tied for second in WPS) and helped the Freedom to a playoff berth … Had five game-winning goals … Named to the WPS Best XI and was the top overall vote-getter for the WPS All-Star Game … 2009: Allocated to the Washington Freedom for the inaugural WPS season in 2009 … Played in 17 games for the Freedom, starting 16, and was the top American goal scorer in WPS with eight goals, which was good for a tie for second in the league …Also had five assists, which tied her for second in WPS, but led the league in shots (70) and shots on goal (35) … Named to the WPS All-Star Team … Helped the Freedom to third-place finish in the regular season and a berth in the playoffs with an 8-7-5 record … 2003: Had a spectacular WUSA season, tying for the league lead in scoring with 33 points (13 goals, 7 assists) and was named to the All-WUSA First Team as she led the Freedom to the WUSA title … Scored both of her team’s goals in the Founders Cup Championship Game, the winner in sudden death overtime, and was named the MVP of the match … Also won the 2003 WUSA Goal of the Year for a spectacular diving header … Led the WUSA in fouls committed with 62 … Had four multi-goal games … Led the WUSA in points per game at 1.83 … Was named as a starter to the WUSA All-Star Game … 2002: Was the second player taken in the 2002 WUSA Draft by the Washington Freedom … Started 19 games for the Freedom, scoring 10 goals, and was named the WUSA Rookie of the Year … Was named All-WUSA Second Team and finished tied for fourth in the WUSA in scoring while helping the Freedom to the WUSA title game … Voted as a starter to the WUSA South All-Star Team and earned MVP honors with two goals and an assist in the South’s 6-1 win … Youth: Was a three-year captain for the Rochester Spirit club … Played several matches for Ajax of Los Angeles in the WPSL in the summer of 2005.


College / High School – As a senior, she scored 31 goals with 13 assists in 24 matches to help Florida to the NCAA Final Four in 2001 … Was the SEC Player of the Year for the second consecutive season in 2001, making her the first player in league history to win player of the year or tournament MVP honors in consecutive seasons … Was a First-Team All-SEC selection for the fourth consecutive season … Was Florida’s leading scorer with 31 goals, 13 assists and 75 points as a senior … Also owns UF’s career records for goals (96), assists (49), points (241), game-winning goals (24) and hat-tricks (10) … Led the NCAA Division I in points per game (3.26) and goals per game (1.34) … Finished her NCAA career sixth all-time in both points (241) and goals (96) … Had 10 multiple-goal matches in 2001, including hat tricks vs. Mississippi State, Kentucky (SEC Tournament semifinal) and Georgia (NCAA Second Round) … Set a UF record with at least one goal in 10 consecutive matches (tied for third best in NCAA history) … Named a finalist for the 2001 Hermann Trophy and Missouri Athletic Club Player of the Year awards … As a junior, she led the Gators with 23 goals and eight assists for 54 points in 2000 … Finished third in the final balloting for the 2000 Hermann Trophy … Her season goal total of 23 was tied for fourth in the nation … As a sophomore in 1999, she started 22 matches and was named a First-Team NSCAA All-America selection … Scored 23 goals with 16 assists for 62 points, which each ranked in the nation’s top five for season totals … Set a school record for assists in a season with 16 … Led the SEC in total points and assists and was second in total goals … Had seven multi-goal matches, including a collegiate-high four goals against LSU and a hat-trick against Vanderbilt in the SEC Tournament semifinal … As a freshman in 1998, she started all 26 games she played in, helping the Gators win the NCAA championship … Second on the team in goals (19), assists (12), and points (50) … Was a Soccer America Freshman All-America selection … Scored five or more points in a match on four occasions … Scored both goals in the Gators’ SEC Tournament final victory against Vanderbilt … High School: During her high school career, she scored 142 goals, including 34 in 1997 … Was the 1997 National High School Player of the Year for Our Lady of Mercy High School … Was named All-Greater Rochester Player of the Year in 1995 and 1997 … Was named an NSCAA All-American in 1996 and 1997 … Was named the Gatorade New York Player of the Year in 1997.


Personal – Full name is Mary Abigail Wambach … Married to former professional soccer player Sarah Huffman … Was a four-year varsity starter for her high school basketball team, earning All-Greater Rochester honors twice ... Is the youngest of seven children, four boys and three girls … Parents came to all but four of her college games … Loves her coffee and newspapers in the morning … Loves listening to music, surfing, playing video games and playing with the kids of the USA’s Soccer Moms … Won three cars in her career as MVP of the WUSA Founders Cup in 2003 and for twice being named the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year … Has an English bulldog named Kingston who can ride a skateboard … Burrito bowls are her favorite thing to eat … Likes mountain biking and being outdoors … After she finishes her soccer career, she would like to hike the Appalachian Trail … Sister Laura played soccer at Xavier … Sister Beth played basketball at Harvard.


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