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Bob Bradley Biography



BOB BRADLEY
Interim Coach:
U.S. Men's National Team
Head Coach: U.S. Under-23 Men’s National Team
Born: March 3, 1958
Hometown: Manhattan Beach, Calif.

Bob Bradley was hired as interim head coach of the U.S. Men’s National Team and head coach of the U.S. Under-23 Men’s National Team on December 8, 2006. Bradley joins the U.S. National Team programs after nine seasons as a head coach in Major League Soccer, having accumulated the most victories of any coach in league history. The Montclair, N.J., native has previously served as assistant coach for the U-23 National Team, holding that position during the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

The only two-time Coach of the Year winner in MLS history, Bradley has brought his teams to the playoffs in each of his first nine seasons as a head coach. He set a record in his first year at the helm in Major League Soccer by becoming the first coach to lead an expansion team to a league championship title in their debut season, directing the Chicago Fire to the MLS Cup in 1998. That same year, Bradley guided the Fire to their first U.S. Open Cup crown while earning the first of his coach of the year titles. Bradley won his second U.S. Open Cup title with Chicago in 2000.

After three seasons at the MetroStars, Bradley joined second-year expansion side Chivas USA in 2006, orchestrating the club's turnaround from having the league's worst record in 2005 into finishing in the top three in goals scored and qualifying for the playoffs the following year. That performance once again earned Bradley MLS Coach of the year honors. He is the only coach in MLS history to have reached the 100-win plateau, his career total currently standing at 124 regular-season victories and an all-time record of 124-94-54.

Bradley began his MLS career serving as Bruce Arena’s top assistant during D.C. United's first two title-winning campaigns (1996-1997), capturing back-to-back MLS Cups (1996, 1997) and one U.S. Open Cup (1996) with the charter MLS club. In 1996, he served as Arena’s assistant for the U.S. Olympic Team that qualified for the Atlanta Games.

A 1980 graduate of Princeton University (where he led the Tigers in scoring his senior year while completing his B.A. in History), Bradley assumed his first head coaching job at age 22, leading the Ohio University men's soccer program (1981) while finishing his M.A. in Sports Administration at the school. Hired in 1983 by Bruce Arena to serve as his assistant at Virginia University (1983-1984), in 1984 Bradley returned to Princeton, where in twelve seasons (1984-1995) he led his alma mater to two Ivy League titles (1988, 1993) and Princeton's only NCAA Final Four berth to date (1993).

Born on March 3, 1958, in Montclair, New Jersey, Bradley is married to Lindsay Bradley and has three children: Ryan, Kerry, and Michael. In his third year as a professional soccer player, Michael currently plays for SC Heerenveen of the Dutch Eredivisie and is a member of the U.S. Under-20 National Team. Bob's brother Scott played for the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball, and is currently the Princeton baseball coach, while his brother Jeff is a senior writer for ESPN The Magazine.

BRADLEY FACT FILE
Personal:
Married to Lindsay, the couple has three children (Ryan, Kerry and Michael) and live in Manhattan Beach, Calif. … Attended Princeton University (1976-1980) and the Ohio University (1981-1983) ... Born March 3, 1958, in Montclair, N.J. … Collegiate Soccer Coaching Career: Assistant coach, University of Virginia (1983-84); Head Coach, Princeton University (1984-1995) … Professional Coaching Career: Assistant Coach, D.C. United (1996-1997); Assistant Coach, U.S. Under-23 Men’s National Team (1996); Head Coach, Chicago Fire (1998-2002); Head Coach, MetroStars (2003-2005); Head Coach, Chivas USA (2006) … Coaching Honors: MLS Coach of the Year (1998, 2006); MLS All-Star Head Coach (2003) … Championships Won: Ivy League Championship (1988), 1993); MLS Cup (1998); U.S. Open Cup (1998, 2000)

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