U.S. Soccer

Steve Cherundolo by the Numbers

Here is a look at some of the noteworthy numbers by U.S. Men's National Team defender Steve Cherundolo, who announced his retirement on Wednesday.


Three-time FIFA World Cup veteran Steve Cherundolo announced his retirement on Wednesday, ending a stellar playing career for both the U.S. Men’s National Team and his longtime professional club Hannover 96 in the German Bundesliga.

Cherundolo was the team captain and spent his entire professional career at Hannover. For the USA, he is on the top-20 list all-time in career appearances (87) and assists (10).

Here is a look at some of Cherundolo’s noteworthy numbers on the international and professional fronts:

  • 2: Career goals with the Men’s National Team – March 22, 2006, against Germany (4-1 loss) and Nov. 17, 2007, against South Africa (1-0 win in the Nelson Mandela Challenge)
  • 3: Career FIFA World Cup rosters (2002, 2006, 2010); one of only three MNT defenders to be rostered for three World Cups, the others being National Soccer Hall of Famers Marcelo Balboa and Eddie Pope
  • 7: Consecutive years Cherundolo recorded at least one assist for the MNT from 2004 to 2010
  • 10: Career assists, which tied him for 12th all-time with Chris Henderson, Brian McBride and Earnie Stewart
  • 13: Years spent on the U.S. MNT from 1999-2012
  • 75: Yards on Cherundolo’s first MNT goal on March 22, 2006, against Germany; his long-distance pass bounced into the net after U.S. forward Eddie Johnson and Germany goalkeeper Oliver Kahn collided into each other
  • 87: Career MNT caps, ranking 19th on the all-time list
  • 302: Club-record appearances at Hannover 96
  • 390: Minutes logged during the 2010 FIFA World Cup as Cherundolo played in every minute of all four matches, including the 120-minute Round of 16 loss against Ghana
  • 45-27-15: U.S. MNT’s record when Cherundolo played in a match (.603 winning percentage)

In Her Own Words - Lynn Williams' First Camp, First Cap, First goal

I got a call that every soccer player dreams of a few days after our last game of the NWSL season.

My coach at the Western New York Flash, Paul Riley, had come up to me a couple of days before that and told me that Jill Ellis might bring me into National Team camp. I was really excited and anxious then, but when I got the call from Tim Ryder, the WNT General Manager, I was sitting in my living room, doing some packing and doing some phone interviews, so it caught me a bit off-guard.

I was trying to act very cool, but on the inside I was so excited. In fact, it’s highly likely that I didn’t sound cool at all.

He told me that I was invited into the training camp for the two games against Switzerland in Utah and Minnesota, but that I had to keep it under wraps until U.S. Soccer officially announced the roster. Of course, I immediately called my parents, my sister, and my boyfriend but I told them that WE ALL needed to keep it a secret.

The roster was announced a week later after we’d won the semifinal against Portland and before the NWSL Championship. I’m not the most talkative person, but it was hard keeping that secret for a week!

Before coming to Utah, I’d only been in a few youth camps with the Under-23s, and all those girls had known each other for a long time. Everyone was nice, but I remember feeling that they were a bit standoffish until you proved yourself, so that’s what I was expecting from the senior group, except times ten. These players are professionals, Olympic champions, World Cup champions and they have tremendous confidence in the environment.

I was a bit nervous about how to fit in.


Williams helped lead the WNY Flash to the club's first NWSL title as the league MVP and Golden Boot winner.

Soccer-wise, coming off the NWSL season, I felt fresh and confident, but I knew it was going to be hard. Coming into a National Team camp any time is hard, and I knew doing it for the first time was going to be a big challenge.

I was definitely nervous about the soccer.

Naturally, the veterans gravitate towards the veterans and the newbies gravitate towards the newbies, but there were 11 uncapped players going in so I knew I wasn’t going to be by myself. Of course, I also knew my Western New York teammates Sam Mewis and Abby Dahlkemper, so that was a bit more comforting.

What I didn’t expect was that the veterans would be so welcoming, on and off the field. When you made a mistake, they said “try this instead” and when you did something well, they would commend you for it. That support really made training even more fun. I learned a lot and every practice was awesome.

That said, training was intense. Everyone was so excited to get into camp that the first couple of days it was like a bunch of mad women running around. As Arin Gilliland said to a reporter, “WNT training is like the NWSL, on three cups of coffee.” It’s probably like five cups.

And it was not just the physical speed; the speed of thought is also so heightened. Playing in New York, sometimes I feel like I can get away with receiving the ball and then decide what to do with it. With the National Team, you have to have like three different options in your mind even before you receive the ball. I knew I needed to improve on that.

We got tons of information from the coaches. Some of the stuff you already know, but the language and the verbiage is different so you have to learn that. You have to learn how they want you to play in a particular formation, you have to learn your assignments on set plays and you have to learn it quickly. Fortunately, everyone is open to questions.

I asked Becky (Sauerbrunn) and Christen (Press) a million questions and my roommate Alyssa (Naeher) probably two million. I am sure she was thinking, “Man, this girl sure asks a lot of questions.” But I figured better to ask than not to ask and look like I have no idea what I’m doing, which I’m sure was still the case some of the time.

For me, the first few days were challenging. You’re trying to get a feel for all the players, their tendencies and how they like to play. Mentally, I think I was putting more pressure on myself that I needed to.

On the third day, I found out I would be a sub for the game. I told myself, “Lynn, stop being such a psycho, stopping being so chaotic, you know how to play soccer,” and I settled in a bit.

I thought I had a good practice the day before the game in Utah and then the day came and I told myself I needed to play even better in the game. After the game, I told myself I needed to play even better in the next practice. Of course, you can’t do that every day, but you have to challenge yourself and that’s the kind of attitude you have to have.

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WNT Oct 27, 2016
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