0

U.S. Under-23 Women's National Team

2018 Thorns Spring Invitational - March 11-17 - Portland, Ore.

PLAYER POS. HT. BIRTHDATE HOMETOWN CLUB/COLLEGE
M 5-3 Mission, Kan.
F Eden Prairie, Minn. Minnesota
M Los Altos Hills, Claif. MVLA
F Northville, Mich. Michigan State
GK Camarillo, Calif.
M Highlands Ranch, Colo.
M 5-11 Milwaukie, Ore. Lake Oswego SC
M 5-4 Jupiter, Fla. Miami
D 5-9 Coto de Caza, Calif. Slammers FC
M Fairview, Texas Sting
D 5-6 Coventry, Conn. Penn State
F 5-8 Sicklerville, N.J. NC State
F San Diego, Calif. Stanford
D 5-7 Ventura, Calif. UCLA
D 5-7 West Chester, Pa. Virginia
F Upper Saddle River, NJ Sockers FC
D 5-6 San Jose, Calif
D 5-7 Roxbury, N.J. Butler
D 5-8 Fairfax Station, Va. BRYC Elite
M 5-7 Leawood, Kan. KC Dynamos
D 5-7 Clemson, S.C. Clemson
M 5-10 Grayson, Ga. GSA
M 5-10 Pullman, Wash. Washington State

2018 Thorns Spring Invitational - March 11-17 - Portland, Ore.

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Height:5-3

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Mission, Kan.

Position:Forward

Birthdate:

Position:Forward

Hometown:Eden Prairie, Minn.

Club:Minnesota

Position:Midfielder

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Los Altos Hills, Claif.

Club:MVLA

Position:Forward

Birthdate:

Position:Forward

Hometown:Northville, Mich.

Club:Michigan State

Position:Goalkeeper

Birthdate:

Position:Goalkeeper

Hometown:Camarillo, Calif.

Position:Midfielder

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Highlands Ranch, Colo.

Position:Midfielder

Height:5-11

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Milwaukie, Ore.

Club:Lake Oswego SC

Position:Midfielder

Height:5-4

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Jupiter, Fla.

Club:Miami

Position:Defender

Height:5-9

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:Coto de Caza, Calif.

Club:Slammers FC

Position:Midfielder

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Fairview, Texas

Club:Sting

Position:Defender

Height:5-6

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:Coventry, Conn.

Club:Penn State

Position:Forward

Height:5-8

Birthdate:

Position:Forward

Hometown:Sicklerville, N.J.

Club:NC State

Position:Forward

Birthdate:

Position:Forward

Hometown:San Diego, Calif.

Club:Stanford

Position:Defender

Height:5-7

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:Ventura, Calif.

Club:UCLA

Position:Defender

Height:5-7

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:West Chester, Pa.

Club:Virginia

Position:Forward

Birthdate:

Position:Forward

Hometown:Upper Saddle River, NJ

Club:Sockers FC

Position:Defender

Height:5-6

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:San Jose, Calif

Position:Defender

Height:5-7

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:Roxbury, N.J.

Club:Butler

Position:Defender

Height:5-8

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:Fairfax Station, Va.

Club:BRYC Elite

Position:Midfielder

Height:5-7

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Leawood, Kan.

Club:KC Dynamos

Position:Defender

Height:5-7

Birthdate:

Position:Defender

Hometown:Clemson, S.C.

Club:Clemson

Position:Midfielder

Height:5-10

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Grayson, Ga.

Club:GSA

Position:Midfielder

Height:5-10

Birthdate:

Position:Midfielder

Hometown:Pullman, Wash.

Club:Washington State

{44708BE9-FE9D-48E9-813E-96B62C1E0D03}

Cindy Cone Voted New Vice President at 2019 U.S. Soccer AGM

CHICAGO (Feb. 16, 2019) – The U.S. Soccer Membership approved a range of appointments and proposals this weekend at the 2019 U.S. Soccer Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Scottsdale, Ariz.

During the National Council Meeting, former U.S. Women’s National Team star Cindy Parlow Cone was elected Vice President, while technology executive Patti Hart was confirmed as an Independent Director on the U.S. Soccer Board of Directors. Additionally, three applicants, Asociacion Nacional Futbol en EU, U.S. Youth Futsal and United States Association of Blind Athletes were admitted as new U.S. Soccer Member Organizations, and the National Independent Soccer Association (NISA) was provisionally sanctioned as a Division III professional league.

CINDY CONE ELECTED NEW U.S. SOCCER VP
Recently inducted as a member of the National Soccer Hall of Fame Class of 2018, Parlow Cone was the sole candidate to complete the nomination process in order to run for the office of the Vice President. Parlow Cone’s term will last one year as she assumes the office that was vacated when former Vice President Carlos Cordeiro was elected as President last February at the 2018 U.S. Soccer AGM. Once the current term is finished next year, the Vice-Presidential election for a full, four-year term will be held at the 2020 National Council Meeting.

“I am grateful to be able to continue to serve our great game as U.S. Soccer Vice President,” said Parlow Cone. “I believe with my extensive knowledge of, and experience working in, the soccer landscape of our country, from grassroots to the international level, I will help U.S. Soccer continue to build, develop, and grow soccer in the United States at every level.”

Parlow Cone’s election as U.S. Soccer VP is the latest step in an impressive career that began as a star forward with the U.S. Women’s National Team from 1996-2004, and title-winning coach at the grassroots, collegiate and professional levels. During the past 20 years, she has served on U.S. Soccer’s Referee Committee, Medical Advisory Committee, Appeals Committee and the Athletes’ Council as well as more recently with U.S. Soccer’s Youth Task Force.

PATTI HART CONFIRMED AS INDEPENDENT DIRECTOR
To replace Independent Director Val Ackerman, whose term expired this week, the National Council elected Patti Hart, an experienced CEO and board member with deep expertise in technology and entertainment to the U.S. Soccer Board of Directors. She also specializes in sales and marketing and brings a keen understanding of consumer trends and corporate governance. Hart has spent 13 years at International Game Technology, Inc., including six as CEO and the last three as vice chairman, leading one of the most innovative and profitable gaming companies with offices on six continents.

“We’re very grateful to Val for her years of service to U.S. Soccer,” said U.S. Soccer President Carlos Cordeiro. “We wish her the best as she continues in her role as Commissioner of the NCAA’s Big East Conference.”

“We’re excited that we were able to bring on such an outstanding individual to serve as Independent Director,” Cordeiro said about Hart. “Patti comes to us with an incredible business background, tremendous experience, and a track record of success in her professional career. We delighted to formally welcome her to the U.S. Soccer family.”

THREE NEW U.S. SOCCER MEMBERS
The addition of Asociacion Nacional Futbol en EU, U.S. Youth Futsal and United States Association of Blind Athletes as new Members brings the total number of U.S. Soccer Member Organizations to 110 and will help further U.S. Soccer’s mission to make soccer, in all its forms, a preeminent sport in the United States and to continue the development of soccer at all recreational and competitive levels.

PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE SANCTIONING
The National Women’s Soccer League was sanctioned for 2019 Division I professional competition during the U.S. Soccer Board of Directors meeting on Friday, Feb. 15.

In the same meeting, the National Independent Soccer Association (NISA) was provisionally sanctioned, adding a second Division III professional league in the United States alongside the United Soccer League’s (USL) League One. USL also operates the USL Championship as a Division II professional league, while Major League Soccer operates as a Division I professional league.

COMMITMENT TO U.S. SOCCER EXTENDED NATIONAL TEAMS
U.S. Soccer has made a tangible commitment in the form of increased resources to its extended National Teams. Starting this year, for the first time ever—U.S. Soccer will have a new department focused exclusively on supporting the Beach National Team, Futsal National Team, and Para 7-a-Side National Team. It will include three new technical hires and a dedicated budget of $2 million. This commitment will enable our Paralympians to play for the team full time.

U.S. SOCCER HONOREES
U.S. Soccer honored two life-long servants of the sport during the AGM. Richard Groff, a former USASA President and U.S. Soccer Board member, joined the family of U.S. Soccer Life Members, which is an honor presented to individuals in recognition of long-time service and distinguished contributions to soccer in the United States. Groff was previously bestowed with the prestigious Werner Fricker Builder Award in 2014, receiving the U.S. Soccer Federation’s highest individual honor for tirelessly furthering the interest of the sport of soccer without regard to personal recognition or advancement.

Joining Groff on the distinguished list of Werner Fricker winners is former U.S. Women’s National Team player, head coach, and Youth Technical Director, April Heinrichs, who was honored at an awards dinner following the National Council Meeting. Heinrichs a world champion as a player, coach and administrator, who captained the USA to the first FIFA Women’s World Cup title in 1991 and then embarked on a long career in support of the women’s game, is the second woman to be honored with the Werner Fricker Builder Award following her former WNT teammate Mary Harvey, who received the award in 2017. Heinrichs is the fourth consecutive Werner Fricker winner whose career focused on building the sport for women and girls in the United States.
Read more
WNT Feb 16, 2019
US Soccer

U.S. Soccer Coaching Education Announces Next A-Youth and B License Course Dates

CHICAGO (Feb. 15, 2019)—U.S. Soccer Coaching Education has determined the dates and locations for the next series of A-Youth and B License courses in 2019. Candidates can apply through the Digital Coaching Center. The application window will be from Thursday, Feb. 21 at 3 p.m. CT to Sunday, March 10 at 11:59 p.m. CT. Prospective candidates should review the application guidelines and course details listed below.

Accepted candidates will have the opportunity to earn a nationally recognized license from U.S. Soccer, the governing body of soccer in all its forms in the United States. For more information on all licenses in the U.S. Soccer Coaching License Pathway, please visit the Digital Coaching Center.

Level

Meetings

Dates

Location

Application Window

B License Course

Meeting 1

May 13-17

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

July 22-26

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Sept. 9-13

Kansas City, Kan.

B License Course

Meeting 1

July 29-Aug. 2

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

Sept. 23-27

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Nov. 11-15

Kansas City, Kan.

B License Course

Meeting 1

Aug. 13-17

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

Oct. 7-11

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Nov. 21-25

Kansas City, Kan.

B License Course

Meeting 1

Aug. 19-23

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

Oct. 14-18

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Dec. 9-13

Kansas City, Kan.

B License Course

Meeting 1

Sept. 16-20

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

Nov. 4-8

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Dec. 13-17

Kansas City, Kan.

A-Youth License Course

Meeting 1

June 9-14

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

Aug. 25-30

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Oct. 27-Nov. 1

Kansas City, Kan.

A-Youth License Course

Meeting 1

June 23-28

Kansas City, Kan.

Feb. 21-March 10

Meeting 2

Sept. 15-20

Kansas City, Kan.

Meeting 3

Nov. 17-22

Kansas City, Kan.

The A-Youth License course is designed for coaches involved in the development of elite youth players on the pathway to becoming professional players. It consists of three five-day course meetings, each followed by a six- to eight-week development period wherein candidates return to their home environment for assignments and mentoring. The course concludes with an individual assessment in the candidate’s home environment.

Applicants must be at least 18-years-old, have held a U.S. Soccer B License for at least six months and currently be working in an appropriate soccer environment for the course content.

The B-License course focuses on principles of long-term player development and developing a team. It includes three five-day meetings, with six- to eight-week development periods in between wherein candidates return to their home environment for assignments and mentoring. 

Applicants must be at least 18-years-old, have held a U.S. Soccer C License for at least one year (or meet the waiver guidelines), have at least three years of coaching experience and currently working in an appropriate soccer environment for the course content.

Prior to submitting an application for either course, applicants should make sure they have met the minimum eligibility requirements. Applications that do not follow the standards outlined in the application guide will not be considered.

The next round of courses will be announced in fall 2019. For other coaching inquiries, please contact U.S. Soccer Coaching Education at coaches@ussoccer.org


Read more
Feb 15, 2019
US Soccer

Remembering Fernando Clavijo

Take the classic American dream. Now add soccer.

That was Fernando Clavijo. An immigrant to this land, he rode that dream – soared on it, really – to grand places. He rode to the very tip-top for almost every professional soccer dreamer, into a World Cup. Later he rode that dream to a career in management and administration as well as the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

That life, rich in soccer and in even richer in personal relationships, was in evidence as tributes poured forth for Clavijo last weekend. They mostly arrived along social media, but also elsewhere, as with the moment of silence before FC Dallas lined up to meet Bayern Munich’s reserves in a preseason friendly.

The former U.S. international and, most recently, FC Dallas’ technical director, passed away on Feb. 8 at his home in Fort Lauderdale. Diagnosed with multiple myeloma five years ago, he had continued to work for the Major League Soccer club until late last summer. He was 63.

Any player would be proud to have achieved what he did in the game: Clavijo was capped 61 times for the United States, including his spot on the U.S. roster for the 1994 FIFA World Cup. The oldest player on the roster at age 38, Clavijo started three tournament matches, on guard at right back for the team’s shocking first round upset against Colombia. History was indeed made on that June day at the Rose Bowl, and he was front-and-center in it.

Alexi Lalas, a teammate on that squad, remembers Clavijo as a tenacious tackler, truly a destructive force along the back line – but one of those soccer players who was a completely different human being outside the white lines. “He was a gentle soul, and a guy who loved playing soccer, loved the game,” Lalas said this week from his Southern California home, not far from where he trained daily with Clavijo in the long run-up to the 1994 World Cup. “He was certainly someone who appreciated every single moment the game gave to him.”

After the World Cup, Clavijo solidified his spot as a member of the National Soccer Hall of Fame, as head coach of the New England Revolution and later for the Colorado Rapids before moving into the front office with FC Dallas.

Yes, all that would suffice to ensconce himself U.S. Soccer history. But his trajectory toward those rewards of the game were anything but typical, and that’s what makes his story extra special.

Immigrant anonymity to international prominence

Clavijo was a fully professional player in his native Uruguay by age 16, and soon after began scanning for opportunities in lands beyond. By the time he was married and into his early 20s, Clavijo definitely wanted to expand his personal soccer world. Alas, he was boxed in by some byzantine rules in Uruguayan soccer at the time, significantly restricted in his ability to move abroad.

Frustrated, he quit the game. At age 22, he was ready for something different, something greater than professional soccer could offer in his native land.

So his humble-beginnings story began like so many others: with a move to the United States and a dream of something more. He and young wife Martha settled in New Jersey, where Clavijo worked as a busboy and played soccer in the park on weekends. That’s where Martha picked up the story, as told to FCDallas.com last year.


Clavijo taking on his native Uruguay on May 5, 1991 in Denver, Colo. 

“One day playing soccer with an Italian team at a park in New Jersey, these other Italian guys came and asked him his name,” she said. “That was the beginning of a chain of events, because that Italian knew another Italian who knew another Italian and that other Italian had a soccer team. And that's how it all unfolded. Just from someone that saw him in a park in New Jersey.”

One thing led to another and Clavijo eventually made good use of a tryout for the New York Apollos of the American Soccer League. Indoor soccer was catching on through the 1980s, so Clavijo’s second stop was the New York Arrows of the thriving Major Indoor Soccer League. Clavijo excelled as a defender, helping the Arrows and, later, the powerful San Diego Sockers claim four MISL championships in six seasons.

All of that helped him gain notice from U.S. national team coach Bora Milutinovic, the Serbian tactician who was charged in 1991 with cobbling together a team that could adequately represent the American game during the 1994 World Cup. It was no easy task, as there was still no major professional outdoor league at that time. (Major League Soccer, in its nascent planning stages through the early 1990s, would not actually launch until 1996.)

So Milutinovic began assembling a mish-mash of college players, professionals from the shoestring-budget American Professional Soccer League and, yes, even indoor soccer. Of that group, Clavijo was quite important. He was already older than most of the players, 38 years old during World Cup USA 1994. Even then, however, Clavijo was among the team’s fastest players.

Marcelo Balboa was positioned nearby along the U.S. back line that summer. The longtime U.S. center back remembered how his early suspicion – here was a guy who was potentially a threat to take Balboa’s starting spot in defense – melted away as he came to know Clavijo’s humility, his easy-going spirit and obvious love for the game.


Clavijo with fellow 1994 FIFA World Cup teammate Paul Caligiuri

“When he comes [into the team], let's be honest, he was like a father figure to most of us because he was older and the experience he had with the San Diego Sockers and the championships he'd won with them. The one thing that pissed everyone off was that he was older than all of us, but he was faster than all of us.”

Even before the 1994 World Cup, Clavijo was leaving his mark on the U.S. scene.

The back line was being built in 1992 around a pair of twin center back hammers, Balboa and Lalas. But it all took a detour when Balboa tore his ACL during a friendly against Iceland in April 1993. He later acknowledged how rehabilitation that year was such a long, frustrating haul. There were days when he wanted to give up – but Clavijo was there and determined not to let him.

“I think that's more and more how our friendship grew and got stronger,” Balboa said. “We became roommates and as a young professional who thought he knew the whole world of soccer, he straightened me out pretty quick on how life is and how a professional acts.”


Fernando Clavijo tackling tough in a match against Romania on Feb. 6, 1993 in Santa Barbara, Calif. 

That was off the field. But Clavijo certainly knew how to leave a mark on match day, as well. Figuratively and quite literally, it seems.

“He was a force of destruction that would take out the ball, the player and the first 10 rows of a stadium on a consistent basis,” Lalas said. “He was a lethal hatchet man in terms of the tackles he would put in. But he was also fast enough that he could make up for any mistakes. Not just his, but any mistakes that we made as center backs.”

“He tackled harder than a lot of guys double his size,” Lalas said. “Marcelo and I certainly appreciated that.”

There are surely lots of stories, telling anecdotes, quips etc., en route to gathering up 61 caps, as Clavijo did. Just as surely, the shining moment above all came June 22, 1994, as hard evening shadows and 93,000-plus filled Pasadena’s Rose Bowl. Clavijo lined up at right back against Colombia, a pre-tournament favorite, largely due to exquisitely skilled playmaker Carlos Valderrama.


Clavijo (bottom row, second from the left) in the U.S. Starting XI that faced Colombia on June 22, 1994 at the Rose Bowl 

Cle Kooiman was a media favorite and a highly regarded teammate for his pump-it-up enthusiasm. Kooiman had started in the team’s World Cup opener, a 1-1 draw with well-regarded Switzerland. Now up against an even stronger team, Milutinovic surmised that he needed something different at right back,  a faster set of feet to deal with speedy forward Faustino Asprilla. U.S. fans and media were shocked when they saw a starting 11 without Kooiman. With a little double-teaming help from Lalas, the U.S. back line kept Valderrama, Asprilla and the rest at bay for 89 minutes, eventually securing the 2-1 upset. It was easily the foremost group-stage shocker of the ’94 tournament.

More than just helping to frustrate Asprilla, Clavijo had an important clearance in the match, earliest to a loose ball during a hold-your-breath moment, a first-half flurry in front of Tony Meola’s U.S. goal.

"Bora called it," Kooiman said after the match, referring to the defensive switch. "The man's a miracle worker. He knew exactly what to do. I don't start, he puts Fernando in there because he's very quick. … Fernando came in and did a great job.

"It was Bora's call, and if he [Clavijo] can keep doing it, more power to him,” Kooiman continued. “I'm a team guy. Today, I'm just happy to be here, to be on the team. I sat on the bench, but right now, I feel like I played an entire game. I got chills out there. Near the end, I felt like crying."

That victory still stands among the most historic in U.S. Soccer history, right along with the 1989 win in Trinidad (that propelled the United States into its first World Cup in decades) and the 2002 World Cup elimination match against Mexico, along with perhaps a couple of others. Thanks largely to that emotionally charged afternoon at the Rose Bowl, the United States did indeed progress into the second round. 


Clavijo and Romario during the USA's Knockout Round match against Brazil on July 4, 1994 in Palo Alto, Calif. 

Clavijo was again on the field two weeks later against Brazil – he made the pass to Tab Ramos and then was first on the scene to assist his fallen teammate, shoving Brazilian attacker Leonardo, whose vicious elbow to the head had just finished Ramos for the day and nearly for his career – as the United States was eliminated in the second round on Independence Day.

Still, passage into the second stage, the Round of 16, had been the primary U.S. goal all along, the generally accepted marker for success that summer. The Knockout Round achievement was a sort of benchmark that helped validate the United States as a deserving World Cup host. Every member of that team, staff and players alike, played an important role in helping the sport in the United States climb that critical rung; Clavijo, the oldest among an otherwise youthful squad, certainly did his part.

All of that, from a guy whose first job in the United States was as a busboy. “What he made of himself was no surprise to those of us who knew him,” Lalas said. “But it was still an incredible story.”

Into Major League Soccer

As Clavijo was past his ideal playing age, he moved quickly into coaching after that 1994 World Cup experience. In fact, coaching was already being sewn into his soccer DNA; Clavijo had served as player coach in 1991 with the (indoor) St. Louis Storm. By the end of 1994 he was head coach of the Seattle SeaDogs of the Continental Indoor Soccer League. Three years later, still in Seattle, he was named CISL Coach of the Year.

Brian Schmetzer, long before he would win an MLS Cup as manager of Seattle Sounders FC, was one of Clavijo’s players with the SeaDogs.

Clavijo’s obvious move from there was back to the outdoor game, where Major League Soccer was planting its spindly roots through the mid-1990s. Clavijo first rejoined his old professor, Milutinovic, serving as an assistant on Nigeria’s 1998 World Cup team. He followed Milutinovic to MLS in 1999 as they paired to coach the league’s high-profile MetroStars. From there Clavijo struck out on his own, assuming the New England Revolution manager’s seat in time for the 2002 season.

Following two and half years at Gillette Stadium and a brief spell coaching Haiti’s national team, Clavijo took his second MLS head coaching appointment, this time with the Colorado Rapids. His first season with the Rapids (2005) was also the year Clavijo was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame. His team at Colorado finished third in the league’s Western Conference and upset higher-seeded Dallas in the playoff’s first round.


Clavijo with fellow 2005 Hall of Fame inductees Hank Steinbrecher, Marcelo Balboa, Tab Ramos and John Harkes

By 2008 he was done with coaching and, four years later, moved into the front office as FC Dallas’ technical director. Clavijo did his part in helping collect young talent from South America and beyond (Fabian Castillo and Mauro Diaz most notably) while also nurturing and mentoring a wellspring of skillful young players rising through the club’s vanguard academy.    

U.S. international Kellyn Acosta was one of those players that Clavijo helped along the way, and was among the many players who expressed their heartfelt sentiment along the social media byways: “RIP Fernando! Thanks for believing in me and giving me the opportunity to become a professional. You’ll be greatly missed. Fly high Fer”

Higher up in the FC Dallas organization, club president Dan Hunt had similar words of high praise for someone who practically counted as family. 

“Fernando was a soccer pioneer,” Hunt said. “His knowledge and passion for the sport were unparalleled. While he was a phenomenal soccer mind, he was an ever better person who brightened the day of everyone he met. This is a sad time for the FC Dallas family and the entire soccer community.”

Read more
MNT Feb 15, 2019
US Soccer

U.S. Soccer Coaching Education Announces 2019 C License Course Dates

CHICAGO (Feb. 12, 2019)—U.S. Soccer Coaching Education has determined the dates and locations for C License courses in 2019. The courses will be organized and hosted by U.S. Soccer members across the country. Potential candidates can register through the Digital Coaching Center. Applicants can directly contact the hosting member organization for more information.

The C License course includes two five-day meetings with a six- to eight-week development period in between wherein candidates return to their home environment for assignments and mentoring. The course covers tasks such as coaching training sessions, coaching games, leading players, leading the team, managing a performance environment and more.

Applicants must be at least 18-years-old, have held a U.S. Soccer D License for at least one year (or meet the waiver guidelines) and currently be coaching. Candidates will have the opportunity to earn a nationally recognized license from U.S. Soccer, the governing body of soccer in all its forms in the United States.

2019 C License Course
Locations, Dates and Contacts

Hosting Member Organization

Meetings

Dates

Location

Contact

Alabama Soccer

Meeting 1

Aug. 14-18

Hoover, Ala.

kevin@alsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Oct. 16-20

   
         

Arizona Soccer

Meeting 1

TBD

TBD

cjuarez@azsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

TBD

   
         

Cal North Soccer

Meeting 1

April 1-5

San Ramon, Calif.

jbordley@calnorth.org

 

Meeting 2

June 3-7

   
         

Cal North Soccer

Meeting 1

Aug. 19-23

Lathrop, Calif.

jbordley@calnorth.org

 

Meeting 2

Oct. 7-11

   
         

Cal South Soccer

Meeting 1

April 10-14

Orange County, Calif.

shoffman@calsouth.com

 

Meeting 2

June 12-16

   
         

Cal South Soccer

Meeting 1

Dec. 18-22

Ventura, Calif.

shoffman@calsouth.com

 

Meeting 2

Feb. 13-17, 2020

 

 

         

Cal South Soccer

Meeting 1

Jan. 16-20

San Diego, Calif.

shoffman@calsouth.com

 

Meeting 2

April 3-7

   
         

Cal South Soccer

Meeting 1

July 10-14

Ojai, Calif.

shoffman@calsouth.com

 

Meeting 2

Sept. 18-22

   
         

Colorado Soccer

Meeting 1

June 10-14

Arvada, Colo.

mfreitag@coloradosoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

July 29 - Aug. 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Junior Soccer Association/Massachusetts Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

March 25-29

Farmington, CT

imulliner@mayouthsoccer.org

tendow@mayouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

May 3-7

   
       

 

Eastern New York Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

July 5-9

Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.

tbradbury@enysoccer.com

 

Meeting 2

Aug. 19-23

   
         

Eastern Pennsylvania Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

July 21-25

Philadelphia, Penn.

gstephenson@epysa.org

 

Meeting 2

Sept. 11-15

   
         

Florida Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Feb. 10-14

Bradenton, Fla.

asimpson3@fysa.com

 

Meeting 2

April 16-20

   
         

Florida Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Sept. 8-12

Jacksonville, Fla.

asimpson3@fysa.com

 

 

Meeting 2

Nov. 3-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Florida Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Dec. 8-12

Weston, Fla.

asimpson3@fysa.com

 

Meeting 2

Feb. 23-27, 2020

   
       

 

Idaho Youth

Meeting 1

March 6-10

Boise, Idaho

sbell@idahoyouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

May 1-5

   
         

Illinois Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

April 22-26

Rockford, Ill.

DOC@illinoisyouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

June 10-14

   
         

Illinois Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

July 29 - Aug. 2

Rockford, Ill.

DOC@illinoisyouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Sept. 23-27

   
         

Indiana Soccer

Meeting 1

Aug. 22-26

Westfield, Ind.

steve@soccerindiana.org

 

Meeting 2

Oct. 24-28

   
         

Kansas Youth

Meeting 1

July 19-23

Kansas City, Kan.

nhunt@kansasyouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Sept. 3-7

   
       

 

Kentucky Youth

Meeting 1

June 11-16

Lexington, Ky.

adrianparrish@kysoccer.net

 

Meeting 2

July 31 - Aug. 4

   
         

New Hampshire Soccer Association/Massachusetts Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Aug. 7-11

Concord, NH

imulliner@mayouthsoccer.org

jeffrey.cousineau@comcast.net

 

Meeting 2

Oct. 14-18

Lancaster, MA

 
         

New Jersey Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

June 17-21

Tinton Falls, N.J.

coach@njyouthsoccer.com

 

Meeting 2

Aug. 12-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nevada Youth Soccer

Meeting 1

Sept. 8-12

Las Vegas, Nev.

kelsey.tesoro@nevadayouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Nov. 3-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Carolina Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

April 15-19

Raleigh, N.C.

doc@ncsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

June 12-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Carolina Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Nov. 13-17

Charlotte, N.C.

doc@ncsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Jan. 22-26, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Texas

Meeting 1

Dec. 4-8

Ft. Worth, Texas

christy@ntxsoccer.org

 

 

Meeting 2

Jan. 22-26, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michigan State Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

April 1-5

Pontiac, Mich.

doc@michiganyouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

June 24-28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mississippi Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Dec. 11-15

Jackson, Miss.

TechDirector@mssoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Jan. 29-Feb. 2, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ohio North Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

June 19-23

Medina, Ohio

coaching@ohionorthsoccer.org

 

 

Meeting 2

Aug. 7-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oregon Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

June 12-16

Portland, Ore.

nelson@oregonyouthsoccer.org

 

 

Meeting 2

July 31 – Aug. 4

 

 

         

South Texas Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

March 25-29

Round Rock, Texas

denisec@stxsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

June 3-7

 

 

         

South Texas Youth Soccer Association

Meeting 1

Nov. 11-15

Edinburg, Texas

denisec@stxsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Jan. 27-31, 2020

   
         

US Club

Meeting 1

July 7-11

Tulsa, Okla.

alehr@usclubsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Aug. 25-29

 

 

         

Utah Youth Soccer

Meeting 1

June 10-14

Ogden, Utah

elandon@utahyouthsoccer.net

 

Meeting 2

July 29 - Aug. 2

   
         

Virginia Youth Soccer

Meeting 1

Aug. 19-23

Fredericksburg, Va.

vysatd@aol.com

 

Meeting 2

Nov. 4-8

 

 

         

Washington Youth Soccer

Meeting 1

June 23-27

Tukwila, Wash.

Paulb@Washingtonyouthsoccer.org

 

Meeting 2

Aug. 11-15

   
         

Wisconsin Youth Soccer

Meeting 1

May 20-24

Milwaukee, Wisc.

jschmitt@wiyouthsoccer.com

 

Meeting 2

July 24-28

   


Read more
Feb 12, 2019
US Soccer

23 Players Named to 2019 SheBelieves Cup Roster

U.S. Women’s National Team head coach Jill Ellis has named the 23-player roster for the 2019 SheBelieves Cup, which features the top-ranked USA, No. 4 England, No. 8 Japan and No. 10 Brazil.

All four teams will be participating in this summer’s 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. Brazil, Japan and the USA are three of the seven teams that have participated in each of the seven previous Women’s World Cup tournaments.

U.S. WNT 2019 SheBelieves Cup Roster (Caps/Goals)

GOALKEEPERS (3): Adrianna Franch (Portland Thorns FC; 0/0), Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride; 19/0), Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars; 40/0)
DEFENDERS (7): Abby Dahlkemper (NC Courage; 32/0), Tierna Davidson (Chicago Red Stars; 14/1), Crystal Dunn (NC Courage; 77/24), Kelley O’Hara (Utah Royals FC; 112/2), Becky Sauerbrunn (Utah Royals FC; 151/0), Casey Short (Chicago Red Stars; 27/0), Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC; 28/0)
MIDFIELDERS (6): Danielle Colaprico (Chicago Red Stars; 2/0), Julie Ertz (Chicago Red Stars; 74/18), Rose Lavelle (Washington Spirit; 21/6), Samantha Mewis (NC Courage; 43/8), Andi Sullivan (Washington Spirit 11/0), McCall Zerboni (NC Courage; 8/0)
FORWARDS (7): Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC; 143/25), Carli Lloyd (Sky Blue FC; 266/105), Jessica McDonald (NC Courage; 5/1), Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride; 155/98), Christen Press (Utah Royals FC; 108/47), Mallory Pugh (Washington Spirit; 45/13), Megan Rapinoe (Reign FC; 146/41)


Both Abby Dahlkemper and Crystal Dunn have been named to the 2019 SheBelieves Cup roster.

“The SheBelieves Cup is a positive event in many ways, but it’s extremely valuable to get three challenging games against World Cup-bound teams in a short time span that can simulate navigating through group play,” said Ellis. “These are all teams that can go deep in the tournament this summer and provide the kind of tests we need as we continue to work to crystalize our lineup and our final roster for the World Cup.”

2019 SheBelieves Cup Schedule

Date

Match-Up

Kickoff

Venue

TV

Feb. 27

England vs. Brazil

4 p.m. ET

Talen Energy Stadium; Chester, Pa.

ussoccer.com

Feb. 27

USA vs. Japan

7 p.m. ET

Talen Energy Stadium; Chester, Pa.

FS1, Fox Sports App

March 2

Brazil vs. Japan

1 p.m. CT

Nissan Stadium; Nashville, Tenn.

ussoccer.com

March 2

USA vs. England

3:30 p.m. CT

Nissan Stadium; Nashville, Tenn.

FOX, Fox Sports App

March 5

Japan vs. England

5:15 p.m. ET

Raymond James Stadium; Tampa, Fla.

ussoccer.com

March 5

USA vs. Brazil

8 p.m. ET

Raymond James Stadium; Tampa, Fla.

FS1 , Fox Sports App


Tickets

Tickets for all three doubleheaders are on sale through ussoccer.com. Groups of 20 or more can submit an online order form at ussoccer.com. SheBelieves Cup VIP packages that include a premium ticket, a tournament t-shirt & scarf, field-level access to watch warmups, and other unique benefits are also available exclusively through ussoccer.com for all three doubleheaders. Coaches Circle and Presidents Circle members supporting the U.S. Soccer Development Fund can receive individual customer support and concierge services for their ticketing needs. Contact circles@ussoccer.org for more information.

Additional Notes:

  • Fifteen of the players named were on last year’s SBC roster and nine players will be participating in their fourth SheBelieves Cup. All 23 players on the U.S. roster were with the WNT for its first two games of the year vs. France and Spain in January.
  • There will be a total of 27 players in the USA’s pre-tournament training camp that will be held in Tampa, Fla. Training with the USA during that period will be GK Jane Campbell, D Merritt Mathias, D Emily Fox and M Allie Long.
  • Midfielder Lindsey Horan was not available for selection due to a quadriceps injury.
  • The USA’s meetings with Japan and Brazil are the first since last summer’s Tournament of Nations when the USA downed Japan, 4-2, and Brazil, 4-1, on the way to claiming the tournament title.


The USA defeated Brazil, 4-1, in Bridgeview, Ill. on Aug. 2, 2018 to claim its second Tournament of Nations title.

  • The USA’s last meeting with England came during the 2018 SheBelieves Cup, a 1-0 victory.
  • The tournament format will be the same as the first three years. The winner will be based on total points (three for a win, one for a draw), with the first tie-breaker being overall goal difference, followed by goals scored, then head-to-head result. If teams are still tied, the next tie-breaker will be the Fair Play ranking. Each Team is allowed six substitutes per game.
  • In the previous three editions of this tournament, no individual player has scored more than two goals in a tournament. Four players have scored twice: Alex Morgan in 2016, Camille Abily of France in 2017, and Ellen White of England and Eugénie Le Sommer in 2018.
  • In 2018, the teams combined for 16 goals and two matches saw three-goal margins of victory with England beating France 4-1, and France beating Germany 3-0.
  • The 2018 SheBelieves Cup marked the debut of England head coach Phil Neville, the former Manchester United and Everton star and England National Team defender. In that SheBelieves Cup, England beat France, tied Germany and lost to the USA. Since then, England has gone 6-1-2 with the only loss coming to the USA’s Group F opponent Sweden, a 2-0 setback in November in Rotherham.
Read more
WNT Feb 12, 2019
×